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I'm pretty new to C++ so I tend to design with a lot of Java-isms while I'm learning. Anyway, in Java, if I had class with a 'search' method that would return an object T from a Collection< T > that matched a specific parameter, I would return that object and if the object was not found in the collection, I would return a NULL. Then in my calling function I would just check if(T != NULL) { ... }

In C++, I'm finding out that I can't return a NULL if the object doesn't exist. I just want to return an 'indicator' of type T that notifies the calling function that no object has been found. I don't want to throw an exception because it's not really an exceptional circumstance.

class Node {
....

Attr& getAttribute(const string& attribute_name) const {
   //search collection
   //if found at i
        return attributes[i];
   //if not found
        return NULL;
}

private:
   vector<Attr> attributes;
}
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2  
Exception and NULL aren't always the only solutions. You can often pick a value to return indicating not found: for example, std::find(first, last, value) returns last if no element matches. –  Jefromi Apr 14 '10 at 16:47

7 Answers 7

up vote 30 down vote accepted

In C++, references can't be null. If you want to optionally return null if nothing is found, you need to return a pointer, not a reference:

Attr *getAttribute(const string& attribute_name) const {
   //search collection
   //if found at i
        return &attributes[i];
   //if not found
        return NULL;
}

Otherwise, if you insist on returning by reference, then you should throw an exception if the attribute isn't found.

(By the way, I'm a little worried about your method being const and returning a non-const attribute. For philosophical reasons, I'd suggest returning const Attr *. If you also may want to modify this attribute, you can overload with a non-const method returning a non-const attribute as well.)

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Thanks. By the way, is this an accepted way of designing such a routine? –  aduric Apr 14 '10 at 17:00
3  
@aduric: Yes. References imply the result has to exist. Pointers imply the result might not exist. –  Bill Apr 14 '10 at 17:15

There are several possible answers here. You want to return something that might exist. Here are some options, ranging from my least preferred to most preferred:

  • Return by reference, and signal can-not-find by exception.

    Attr& getAttribute(const string& attribute_name) const 
    {
       //search collection
       //if found at i
            return attributes[i];
       //if not found
            throw no_such_attribute_error;
    }

It's likely that not finding attributes is a normal part of execution, and hence not very exceptional. The handling for this would be noisy. A null value cannot be returned because it's undefined behaviour to have null references.

  • Return by pointer

    Attr* getAttribute(const string& attribute_name) const 
    {
       //search collection
       //if found at i
            return &attributes[i];
       //if not found
            return NULL;
    }

It's easy to forget to check whether a result from getAttribute would be a non-NULL pointer, and is an easy source of bugs.

  • Use Boost.Optional

    boost::optional<Attr&> getAttribute(const string& attribute_name) const 
    {
       //search collection
       //if found at i
            return attributes[i];
       //if not found
            return boost::optional<Attr&>();
    }

A boost::optional signifies exactly what is going on here, and has easy methods for inspecting whether such an attribute was found.

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+1 I would just mention boost::optional first, and only briefly mention the other alternatives. –  Nemanja Trifunovic Apr 14 '10 at 17:02
    
Ya I saw boost::optional mentioned somewhere but I was thinking that it required too much overhead. If using it is the best approach to these kinds of problems, I will start using it. –  aduric Apr 14 '10 at 17:09
    
boost::optional does not involve much overhead (no dynamic allocation), which is why it's so great. Using it with polymorphic values requires wrapping references or pointers. –  Matthieu M. Apr 14 '10 at 18:09
    
@MatthieuM. It is likely that the overhead aduric was referring to was not performance, but the cost of including an external library into the project. –  Swoogan Oct 28 '11 at 19:11
    
An addendum to my answer: do note that there is a movement afoot to standardize optional as a std component, probably for what may well be C++17. So it's worth knowing about this technique. –  Kaz Dragon Feb 19 at 10:19

You can easily create a static object that represents a NULL return.

class Attr;
extern Attr AttrNull;

class Node { 
.... 

Attr& getAttribute(const string& attribute_name) const { 
   //search collection 
   //if found at i 
        return attributes[i]; 
   //if not found 
        return AttrNull; 
} 

bool IsNull(const Attr& test) const {
    return &test == &AttrNull;
}

 private: 
   vector<Attr> attributes; 
};

And somewhere in a source file:

static Attr AttrNull;
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Shouldn't NodeNull be of type Attr? –  aduric Apr 14 '10 at 17:12
    
Good point, I'll fix the example. –  Mark Ransom Apr 14 '10 at 17:19

If you want a NULL return value you need to use pointers instead of references.

References can't themselves be NULL.

(Note to the future comment posters: Yes you can have the address of a reference be NULL if you really really try to).

See my answer here for a list of differences between references and pointers.

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The reason that you can't return NULL here is because you've declared your return type as Attr&. The trailing & makes the return value a "reference", which is basically a guaranteed-not-to-be-null pointer to an existing object. If you want to be able to return null, change Attr& to Attr*.

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You are unable to return NULL because the return type of the function is an object reference and not a pointer.

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return *static_cast<Attr *>(NULL);
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