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I've written a simple class for debugging and I call the method Debugger.WriteLine(...) in my code like this:

Debugger.WriteLine("[Draw]", "InProgress",
    "[x,y] = " + x.ToString("0.00") + 
    ", " + y.ToString("0.00") + 
    "; pos = " + lastPosX.ToString() + "x" + 
    lastPosY.ToString() + " -> " + posX.ToString() + 
    "x" + posY.ToString() + "; SS = " + 
    squareSize.ToString() + "; MST = " + 
    startTime.ToString("0.000") + "; Time = " + time.ToString() +
    phase.ToString(".0000") + "; progress = " + 
    progress.ToString("0.000") + "; step = " + 
    step.ToString() + "; TimeMovementEnd = " + 
    UI.MovementEndTime.ToString()
);

The body of the procedure Debugger.WriteLine is compiled only in Debug mode (directives #if, #endif). What makes me worry is that I often need ToString() in Debugger.WriteLine call which is costly because it creates still new strings (for changing number for example). How to solve this problem?

A few points/questions about debugging/tracing:

  • I don't want to wrap every Debugger.WriteLine in an IF statement or to use preprocessor directives in order to leave out debugging methods because it would inevitable lead to a not very readable code and it requires too much typing.

  • I don't want to use any framework for tracing/debugging. I want to try to program it myself.

  • Are Trace methods left out if compiling in release mode? If it is so is it possible that my methods would behave similarly?

  • With the static String.Format method I can do this:

    output = String.Format("You are now {0} years old.", years);

Which seems nice. Is it a solution for my problem with ToString()?

share|improve this question
    
Is there really a performance problem in this method? –  harpo Apr 14 '10 at 18:58
    
@harpo: There are a lot of immutable strings being created. A single call isn't too bad but if this method is outputted frequently enough, there will be a slow down due to all the string object allocations. –  Paul Sasik Apr 14 '10 at 19:00
    
It's called frequently. –  MartyIX Apr 14 '10 at 19:08

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use StringBuilder to create your output strings instead of concatenating each and every value.

And you can create your own custom debugger (MyDbg) class that contains a WriteLine member the contents of which you can surround with compile directives. It wouldn't entirely compile out the debug code but would turn you MyDbg.WriteLine calls into no-ops.

Here's a quick sketch of the class:

using System;
using System.Text ;

public static class MyDbg
{
    public static void WriteLine(string str) // and some other params
    {
        #if DEBUG

        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        sb.Append(str);
        // etc. appending other params as you see fit
        #endif
    }
}

OR

[Conditional("DEBUG")]
public static class MyDbg
{
    public static void WriteLine(string str) // and some other params
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        sb.Append(str);
        // etc. appending other params as you see fit
    }
}

You'd modify it to suit your own needs of course. And instead of creating a separate class, you could create a member method if #if DEBUG/#endif built-in for displaying its own state when in the debugger.

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't believe that StringBuilder will make any difference in this case. Since the strings are assembled in a single statement, the compiler will not create intermediate strings for each concatenation. (AFAIK) –  harpo Apr 14 '10 at 18:59
    
@harpo: That's a compiler optimization i've never heard of. As far as i know, string operations are immutable and any concatenation or augmentation creates a new one regardless of where it's used. –  Paul Sasik Apr 14 '10 at 19:02
    
harpo is right: the compiler replaces a + b + c with string.Concat(a,b,c) –  Catalin DICU Apr 14 '10 at 19:12
    
I have contents of methods surrounded with compile directives. But how to use StringBuilder and still have just one line call of debugging method? –  MartyIX Apr 14 '10 at 19:13
1  
@Paul Sasik: use Reflector and see for yourself –  Catalin DICU Apr 14 '10 at 19:33

Using Reflector I found out that Debug.Writeline is declared this way :

[Conditional("DEBUG")]
public static void WriteLine(string message)

That means that in Release mode all calls to this method are eliminated from code.

For example this code :

public static void Test(int a)
{
    string b = Console.ReadLine();
    Debug.WriteLine(a + " " + b);
    Console.WriteLine(a + " " + b);
}

compiles in release mode to :

public static void Test(int a)
{
    Console.WriteLine(a + " " + Console.ReadLine());
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1; msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa288458(VS.71).aspx - the link that confirms what you've said. –  MartyIX Apr 14 '10 at 19:25

For Logging have a look at frameworks such as Log4net or the Enterprise library. They make logging configurable in many ways. Even if you want to log at all.

HTH

share|improve this answer

Using string.Format(), the expected output will actually become more easily recognizable just from looking at the code (IMHO):

Debug.WriteLine(string.Format(
    "[Draw]InProgress[x,y] = {0:0.00}, {1:0.00}; pos = {2}x{3} -> {4}x{5}; ...",
    x, y,
    lastPosX, lastPosY,
    posX, posY,
    ...));
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it looks good! –  MartyIX Apr 14 '10 at 19:20

The pattern I use is to define a logging interface (ILogger) that gets dependency injected into all the classes

public class MyClassThatLogs
{
    public MyClassThatLogs(ILogger logger)
    {
        try
        {
            logger.Write("bla bla bla");
        }
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            logger.Write(ex); //overload of Write() that takes in an Exception
        }
    }
}

So when you new it up you can pass in a 'real' logger or a mock/fake one

var mc = new MyClassThatLogs(new FakeLogger());

Now you have abstracted away the need to know in the MyClassThatLogs class what's going on with logging. Basic SOLID stuff. So the 'top' (say main() method of a console) would have the IF DEBUG directive then pass in the correct implementation of the logger.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for suggestion! I was thinking about [Conditional("FakeLogger")], [Conditional("MyLogger")],... for classes. Maybe it would be also flexible as your solution. The change of logger would be matter of changing mode in Visual Studio. –  MartyIX Apr 14 '10 at 20:07
    
Cool! The important take away I think is to get the dependency out of your class... your class shouldn't care how logging is implemented, it should just declare that it needs to log. Again, this just comes from the SOLID principles--Inversion of control and Dependency Injection. –  Kevin Won Apr 14 '10 at 22:17
  1. You do not need to wrap every line. Just write helper method containing Debug.WriteLine and turn it on/off by flag (usually bool).

  2. Tracing will be in your code even in release mode. You can configure it, see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.diagnostics.tracelistener.aspx

  3. string.Format calls ToString() on arguments internally, so no benefit there.

share|improve this answer
    
1. I've done that. 2., 3. thanks for answer! –  MartyIX Apr 14 '10 at 19:13
    
Concerning (3), I think this is not relevant here, as performance considerations are usually a non-issue in Debug configuration, anyway. string.Format still has the benefit of improving code legibility (which, I'd say, sort of goes hand in hand with debugging.) –  stakx Apr 14 '10 at 19:15
    
stakx: I think it is relevant, because you can have tracing enabled in release code, thus affecting application performance. –  Tomas Voracek Apr 14 '10 at 21:07

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