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I am trying to generate a good random seed for a psudo-random number generator. I thought I'd get the expert's opinions. let me know if this is a bad way of doing it or if there are much better ways.

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <fstream>
#include <ctime>

unsigned int good_seed()
{
    unsigned int random_seed, random_seed_a, random_seed_b; 
    std::ifstream file ("/dev/random", std::ios::binary);
    if (file.is_open())
    {
        char * memblock;
        int size = sizeof(int);
        memblock = new char [size];
        file.read (memblock, size);
        file.close();
        random_seed_a = int(memblock);
        delete[] memblock;
    }// end if
    else
    {
        random_seed_a = 0;
    }
    random_seed_b = std::time(0);
    random_seed = random_seed_a xor random_seed_b;
    return random_seed;
} // end good_seed()
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don't forget to roll dice and xor with it ;) –  Andrey Apr 14 '10 at 20:20
2  
What would happen if your process runs out of file handles and can't open /dev/random? –  Greg Hewgill Apr 14 '10 at 20:21

7 Answers 7

The code that reads from /dev/random seems wrong: you're C-style casting the address of your character buffer into random_seed_a (plug for C++ casts here) and ignoring anything you actually read from /dev/random (try *reinterpret_cast<int*>(memblock).

/dev/random should already be a good entropy source, so if it's available don't possibly taint the value with any other data and just use it as the seed directly. If there isn't enough data in /dev/random I would just fall back on the time and use that by itself rather than xor'ing it with something.

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1  
according to my studies a non-deterministic random variable "dev/urandom" xor-ed with a not so random variable time(0) will still be a non-deterministic random variable. –  posop Apr 14 '10 at 23:13

Good pseudo-random number generators don't need a "good" seed, any seed (that's different from run to run) works equally well.

Using system time directly is fine (and common). Using /dev/random is also fine.

If your pseudo-random number generator isn't good, even picking a "good" seed won't help. Replace it if you can.

Suggestions: Mersenne twister is a pretty well regarded. Here's a precursor which will run on even the most limited of systems.

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3  
Depending on the purpose, a pseudo-random number generator may need an unpredictable seed. There was an on-line poker game that fed the time into what may have been a decent PRNG, which meant that it was possible, by observing some cards, to figure out where the PRNG started, and hence to know the whole deck. –  David Thornley Apr 14 '10 at 21:07
1  
If it's at all important for users to not be able to predict the random number sequence, then you want a cryptographically secure generator, not a pseudorandom generator. (You're crazy if you base real-money gambling on a pseudorandom generator.) –  Jon-Eric Apr 14 '10 at 21:15
    
Just FYI, with Mersenne twister, you have to observe 624 consecutive cards (12 decks) before you know all the future cards. –  Jon-Eric Apr 14 '10 at 21:30
    
True. To give the poker site due credit, they weren't gambling their own money, although I suspect they lost business once word got around. –  David Thornley Apr 14 '10 at 21:31

Ok here's the changes I made after considering your input. Thanks for everything by the way!

unsigned int good_seed()
{
    unsigned int random_seed, random_seed_a, random_seed_b; 
    std::ifstream file ("/dev/urandom", std::ios::binary);
    if (file.is_open())
    {
        char * memblock;
        int size = sizeof(int);
        memblock = new char [size];
        file.read (memblock, size);
        file.close();
        random_seed_a = *reinterpret_cast<int*>(memblock);
        delete[] memblock;
    }// end if
    else
    {
        random_seed_a = 0;
    }
    random_seed_b = std::time(0);
    random_seed = random_seed_a xor random_seed_b;
    std::cout << "random_seed_a = " << random_seed_a << std::endl;
    std::cout << "random_seed_b = " << random_seed_b << std::endl;
    std::cout << " random_seed =  " << random_seed << std::endl;
    return random_seed;
} // end good_seed()
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Traditionally, we've used first or second user input to seed our values as the (tics to millisecond range) amount of time it takes them to respond is pretty variable.

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"Good" generators, "Bad generators" it doesn't mean anything. "Anyone who considers arithmetical methods of producing random digits is, of course, in a state of sin." - John von Neumann. Every such generator is just a deterministic algorithm. It's very important to have initial states ( seed ) that bring enough entropy. Depending on what you need, you should test your generator quality. Monte Carlo method is a very good estimator of a pseudo random number generator.

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Define good. :-)

Is it important to find a seed quickly, or that the seed be as random as possible no matter how long it takes to put together?

For a balance - definitely not the most random, definitely not the fastest...

  • When it's first called, take the system time, in milliseconds.
  • Run that through a hash function, like SHA-1.
  • Use the result as the seed.

That should give you a mostly-random 160 bits, which is 10^50th or so of variability. The hash will take a split second to run, so this isn't lightning fast, but has been a good balance in the past for me.

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I'd like to have as random as possible for my application, but I'd be interested in a fast solution too. –  posop Apr 14 '10 at 20:22
2  
@DeanJ The hash is superfluous. Just seed with the system time directly. What you're trying to accomplish with the hash is what (a good) pseudo random number generator already does (better). –  Jon-Eric Apr 14 '10 at 20:34
    
Jon-Eric is 100% correct; on the other hand, I'm used to working with bad random number generators, couldn't tell a good one from a bad one, and tend to stick with (quick) overkill. –  Dean J Apr 14 '10 at 20:43

Maybe you should prefer /dev/urandom/ over /dev/random. The latter blocks on Linux if there is not enough entropy available, which can easily happen if the program runs on a machine without user interaction. In case you cannot open /dev/urandom, you could throw an exception instead of using a fallback.

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