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Alright, so what i have, is a large string i need to parse, and what i need to happen, is find all the instances of extract"(me,i-have lots. of]punctuation, and store them to a list.

So say this piece of string was in the beginning and middle of the larger string, both of them would be found, and their index's would be added to the List. and the List would contain 0 and the other index whatever it would be.

Ive been playing around, and the string.IndexOf does almost what i'm looking for, and ive written some code. But i cant seem to get it to work:

            List<int> inst = new List<int>();
            int index = 0;
            while (index < source.LastIndexOf("extract\"(me,i-have lots. of]punctuation", 0) + 39)
            {
                int src = source.IndexOf("extract\"(me,i-have lots. of]punctuation", index);
                inst.Add(src);
                index = src + 40;
            }
  • inst = The list
  • source = The large string

Any better ideas?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 26 down vote accepted

I was bored so I wrote this extension method. It's untested but should give you a good start.

public static List<int> AllIndexesOf(this string str, string value) {
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
        throw new ArgumentException("the string to find may not be empty", "value");
    List<int> indexes = new List<int>();
    for (int index = 0;; index += value.Length) {
        index = str.IndexOf(value, index);
        if (index == -1)
            return indexes;
        indexes.Add(index);
    }
}

If you put this into a static class and import it with using, it appears as a method on any string, and you can just do:

List<int> indexes = "fooStringfooBar".AllIndexesOf("foo");

For more information on extension methods, http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb383977.aspx

Edit: and the same using an iterator:

public static IEnumerable<int> AllIndexesOf(this string str, string value) {
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
        throw new ArgumentException("the string to find may not be empty", "value");
    for (int index = 0;; index += value.Length) {
        index = str.IndexOf(value, index);
        if (index == -1)
            break;
        yield return index;
    }
}
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2  
Why not use IEnumerable<int> and yield return index instead of the indexes list? –  m0sa Apr 15 '10 at 1:15
    
@m0sa: Good point. Added another version just for the fun of it. –  Matti Virkkunen Apr 15 '10 at 8:28
    
Does the use of yield have any incidence in the performance? Does the retrieval of the objects becomes async or lazy? Os is it just syntactic sugar and both codes are the same? –  PedroC88 Oct 1 '13 at 15:17
1  
@PedroC88: Using yield will make the code "lazy". It won't collect all the indexes into an in-memory list within the method. What kind of practical effect that has on performance depends on a lot of factors. –  Matti Virkkunen Oct 2 '13 at 9:01

Why don't you use the built in RegEx class:

public static IEnumerable<int> GetAllIndexes(this string source, string matchString)
{
   matchString = Regex.Escape(matchString);
   foreach (Match match in Regex.Matches(source, matchString))
   {
      yield match.Index;
   }
   return indexes;
}

If you do need to reuse the expression then compile it and cache it somewhere. Change the matchString param to a Regex matchExpression in another overload for the reuse case.

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using LINQ

public static IEnumerable<int> IndexOfAll(this string sourceString, string subString)
        {
            return Regex.Matches(sourceString, subString).Cast<Match>().Select(m => m.Index);
        }
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You forgot to escape the subString though. –  csaam Apr 15 '10 at 4:12
    
true ... true ... –  ehosca Apr 15 '10 at 15:07

Based on the code I've used for finding multiple instances of a string within a larger string, your code would look like:

List<int> inst = new List<int>();
int index = 0;
while (index >=0)
{
    index = source.IndexOf("extract\"(me,i-have lots. of]punctuation", index);
    inst.Add(index);
    index++;
}
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public List<int> GetPositions(string source, string searchString)
{
    List<int> ret = new List<int>();
    int len = searchString.Length;
    int start = -len;
    while (true)
    {
        start = source.IndexOf(searchString, start + len);
        if (start == -1)
        {
            break;
        }
        else
        {
            ret.Add(start);
        }
    }
    return ret;
}

Call it like this:

List<int> list = GetPositions("bob is a chowder head bob bob sldfjl", "bob");
// list will contain 0, 22, 26
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@csam is correct in theory, although his code will not complie and can be refractored to

public static IEnumerable<int> IndexOfAll(this string sourceString, string matchString)
        {
            matchString = Regex.Escape(matchString);
            return from Match match in Regex.Matches(sourceString, matchString) select match.Index;
        }
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if his code was incorrect you could've edited his post to correct it –  caesay Dec 13 '12 at 20:09
    
I hadn't noticed that. I have to admit to being reluctant to do that, just in case I am wrong, although I don't think I am. –  arame3333 Dec 13 '12 at 22:49

Polished version + case ignoring support:

public static int[] AllIndexesOf(string str, string substr, bool ignoreCase = false)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(str) ||
        string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(substr))
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("String or substring is not specified.");
    }

    var indexes = new List<int>();
    int index = 0;

    while ((index = str.IndexOf(substr, index, ignoreCase ? StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase : StringComparison.Ordinal)) != -1)
    {
        indexes.Add(index++);
    }

    return indexes.ToArray();
}
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