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I've seen it used in programming (specifically in the C++ domain) and have no idea what it is. Presumably it is a design pattern, but I could be wrong. Can anyone give a good example of a thunk?

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Just as an FYI, a thunk is also sometimes called a 'trampoline' (in the general case, maybe not in the C++ domain). –  Michael Burr Apr 14 '10 at 23:23
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The word thunk has at least three related meanings in computer science. A "thunk" may be:

  • a piece of code to perform a delayed computation (similar to a closure)
  • a feature of some virtual function table implementations (similar to a wrapper function)
  • a mapping of machine data from one system-specific form to another, usually for compatibility reasons

I have usually seen it used in the third context.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thunk

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Interesting; I usually hear the second form, but I guess it depends what kind of work you do more often –  Michael Mrozek Apr 14 '10 at 22:27
    
Specifically, related by being automatically generated very short blocks of machine code - even the first case is normally just giving context to a precompiled implementation function. –  Simon Buchan Apr 14 '10 at 22:32
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A thunk usually refers to a small piece of code that is called as a function, does some small thing, and then JUMPs to another location (usually a function) instead of returning to its caller. Assuming the JUMP target is a normal function, when it returns, it will return to the thunk's caller.

Thunks can be used to implement lots of useful things efficiently

  • protocol translation -- when calling from code that uses one calling convention to code that uses a different calling convention, a thunk can be used to translate the arguments appropriately. This only works if the return conventions are compatable, but that is often the case

  • virtual function handling -- when calling a virtual function of a multiply-inherited base class in C++, there needs to be a fixup of the this pointer to get it to point to the right place. A thunk can do this.

  • dynamic closures -- when you build a dynamic closure, the closure function needs to be able to get at the context where it was created. A small thunk can be built (usually on the stack) which sets up the context info in some register(s) and then jumps to a static piece of code that implements the closure's function. The thunk here is effectively supplying one or more hidden extra arguments to the function that are not provided by the call site.

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This is the best explanation, because it explains what the thunk is instead of what it usually does in typical use cases to implement different things. Other answers focus too much on those particular implementations instead of the general idea. –  SasQ Mar 21 at 1:01
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Some compilers for object-oriented languages such as C++ generate functions called "thunks" as an optimization of virtual function calls in the presence of multiple or virtual inheritance.

Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thunk#Thunks_in_object-oriented_programming

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There's considerable variation in use. Almost universally, a thunk is a function that's (at least conceptually) unusually small and simple. It's usually some sort of adapter that gives you the correct interface to something or other (some data, another function, etc.) but is at least seen as doing little else.

It's almost like a form of syntactic sugar, except that (at least as usually used) syntactic sugar is supposed to make things look the way the human reader wants to see them, and a thunk is to make something look the way the compiler wants to see it.

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Sounds like the opposite of syntactic sugar to me :) –  Laserallan Apr 14 '10 at 23:00
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Syntactic sugar for compilers then? Almost, but not quite, entirely unlike syntactic sugar. –  Duncan Apr 14 '10 at 23:14
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I'm going to look this up, but I thought thunking was the process employed by a 32-bit processor to run legacy 16-bit code.

I used to use it as an analogy for how you have to restrict how fast you talk and what words you use when talking to dumb people.

Yeah, it's in the Wikipedia link (the part about 32-bit, not my nerdalogy).

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This question has already been asked on SO, see:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/925365/what-is-a-thunk-as-used-in-scheme-or-in-general

From what I can tell, it's akin to a lambda statement, where you may not want to return the value until you need to evaluate it; or it can also be compared to a property getter which by design executes some code in order to return a value while yet having the interface form that comes across more like a variable, but also has polymorphic behavior that can be swapped out whether by inheritance or by swapping out the function pointer that would evaluate and return a value at runtime based on compile-time or environmental characteristics.

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I was distressed to find no general 'computer science' definition of this term matching its de-facto usage as known historically to me. The first real-life encounter I can recall where it was actually called that was in the OS/2 days and the 16-32 bit transition. It appears "thunking" is like irony in its application today.

My rough general understanding is that the thunk is a stub routine that just does nothing or routes across some fundamental boundary in kind between systems as in the mentioned historical cases.

So the sense is like a synesthesia of being dropped from the one environment to the other making (metaphorically/as a simile) a "thunk" sound.

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Interesting tip. I was wondering about the actual etymology of this word too, and I imagined people playing "bush telegraph", where one of the persons in the stream silently (and in many cases unknowingly) transforms the message on the way. –  SasQ Mar 21 at 1:07
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