Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an array of hashes like following

[
  { :foo => 'foo', :bar => 2 },
  { :foo => 'foo', :bar => 3 },
  { :foo => 'foo', :bar => 5 },
]

I am trying to sort above array in descending order according to the value of :bar in each hash.

I am using sort_by like following to sort above array.

a.sort_by { |h| h[:bar] }

However above sorts the array in ascending order. How do I make it sort in descending order?

One solution was to do following:

a.sort_by { |h| -h[:bar] }

But that negative sign does not seem appropriate. Any views?

share|improve this question
2  
Given the other options I still think -h[:bar] is the most elegant. What do you not like about it? –  Michael Kohl Apr 15 '10 at 10:34
    
I was much more interested on conveying the intent of code. –  Waseem Apr 17 '10 at 9:58
    
@Waseem could I trouble you to update the accepted answer? –  colllin Feb 22 '13 at 3:05
2  
@Waseem There's nothing wrong with the current answer. There's just happens to be a far better answer. the Tin Man's answer is much more thorough and shows that sort_by.reverse is dramatically more efficient than the currently accepted answer. I believe it also better addresses the concern you mentioned above for "conveying the intent of code". On top of that, the Tin Man has updated his answer for the current version of ruby. This question has been viewed over 15k times. If you can save even 1 second of each viewer's time, I think it's worth it. –  colllin Feb 26 '13 at 5:36
1  
@collindo Thanks I did it. :) –  Waseem Feb 26 '13 at 18:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 195 down vote accepted

It's always enlightening to do a benchmark on the various suggested answers. Here's what I found out:

#!/usr/bin/ruby

require 'benchmark'

ary = []
1000.times { 
  ary << {:bar => rand(1000)} 
}

n = 500
Benchmark.bm(20) do |x|
  x.report("sort")               { n.times { ary.sort{ |a,b| b[:bar] <=> a[:bar] } } }
  x.report("sort reverse")       { n.times { ary.sort{ |a,b| a[:bar] <=> b[:bar] }.reverse } }
  x.report("sort_by -a[:bar]")   { n.times { ary.sort_by{ |a| -a[:bar] } } }
  x.report("sort_by a[:bar]*-1") { n.times { ary.sort_by{ |a| a[:bar]*-1 } } }
  x.report("sort_by.reverse!")   { n.times { ary.sort_by{ |a| a[:bar] }.reverse } }
end

                          user     system      total        real
sort                  3.960000   0.010000   3.970000 (  3.990886)
sort reverse          4.040000   0.000000   4.040000 (  4.038849)
sort_by -a[:bar]      0.690000   0.000000   0.690000 (  0.692080)
sort_by a[:bar]*-1    0.700000   0.000000   0.700000 (  0.699735)
sort_by.reverse!      0.650000   0.000000   0.650000 (  0.654447)

I think it's interesting that @Pablo's sort_by{...}.reverse! is fastest. Before running the test I thought it would be slower than "-a[:bar]" but negating the value turns out to take longer than it does to reverse the entire array in one pass. It's not much of a difference, but every little speed-up helps.


Please note that these results are different in Ruby 1.9

Here are results for Ruby 1.9.3p194 (2012-04-20 revision 35410) [x86_64-darwin10.8.0]:

                           user     system      total        real
sort                   1.340000   0.010000   1.350000 (  1.346331)
sort reverse           1.300000   0.000000   1.300000 (  1.310446)
sort_by -a[:bar]       0.430000   0.000000   0.430000 (  0.429606)
sort_by a[:bar]*-1     0.420000   0.000000   0.420000 (  0.414383)
sort_by.reverse!       0.400000   0.000000   0.400000 (  0.401275)

These are on an old MacBook Pro. Newer, or faster machines, will have lower values, but the relative differences will remain.


Here's a bit updated version on newer hardware and the 2.1.1 version of Ruby:

#!/usr/bin/ruby

require 'benchmark'

puts "Running Ruby #{RUBY_VERSION}"

ary = []
1000.times {
  ary << {:bar => rand(1000)}
}

n = 500

puts "n=#{n}"
Benchmark.bm(20) do |x|
  x.report("sort")               { n.times { ary.dup.sort{ |a,b| b[:bar] <=> a[:bar] } } }
  x.report("sort reverse")       { n.times { ary.dup.sort{ |a,b| a[:bar] <=> b[:bar] }.reverse } }
  x.report("sort_by -a[:bar]")   { n.times { ary.dup.sort_by{ |a| -a[:bar] } } }
  x.report("sort_by a[:bar]*-1") { n.times { ary.dup.sort_by{ |a| a[:bar]*-1 } } }
  x.report("sort_by.reverse")    { n.times { ary.dup.sort_by{ |a| a[:bar] }.reverse } }
  x.report("sort_by.reverse!")   { n.times { ary.dup.sort_by{ |a| a[:bar] }.reverse! } }
end

# >> Running Ruby 2.1.1
# >> n=500
# >>                            user     system      total        real
# >> sort                   0.670000   0.000000   0.670000 (  0.667754)
# >> sort reverse           0.650000   0.000000   0.650000 (  0.655582)
# >> sort_by -a[:bar]       0.260000   0.010000   0.270000 (  0.255919)
# >> sort_by a[:bar]*-1     0.250000   0.000000   0.250000 (  0.258924)
# >> sort_by.reverse        0.250000   0.000000   0.250000 (  0.245179)
# >> sort_by.reverse!       0.240000   0.000000   0.240000 (  0.242340)
share|improve this answer
11  
Super useful. Thanks for the extra effort. –  Josh Pinter Jan 25 '12 at 23:36
1  
The times got better with 1.9.3, but sort_by is still faster, as is sort_by.reverse!. –  the Tin Man Sep 17 '12 at 5:56
2  
i love it when people provide the benchmark proof like this!! Awesome! –  Globalkeith Oct 12 '12 at 12:43
8  
"i love it when people provide the benchmark proof like this!!" I do too, because then I don't have to. –  the Tin Man Oct 24 '12 at 4:21
1  
@theTinMan Can you please provide a TL;DR for your answer. All this benchmark information is quite useful. But a TL;DR on top of the answer will be useful for people who just want the answer. I know they should read the whole explanation and I think they will. Still a TL;DR will be quite useful IMHO. Thanks for your effort. –  Waseem Feb 26 '13 at 18:45

You could do:

a.sort{|a,b| b[:bar] <=> a[:bar]}
share|improve this answer
7  
@JRL: I'll make your day... there you go +1 .. .congratulation you're 10k user now.. now go to the tools section above and enjoy your new powers! –  OscarRyz Apr 15 '10 at 1:42
    
I want those too!! :( hehe, congrats @JRL! –  Pablo Fernandez Apr 15 '10 at 1:43
    
You're almost there Pablo, you just need another... 5,740 :) edit +1 5,730 now –  OscarRyz Apr 15 '10 at 1:45
4  
but the whole point of using sort_by was that it avoided running the comparison function so many times –  user102008 Sep 28 '11 at 19:33
1  
-1. sort_by is so much more efficient, and more readable. Negating the value or doing a reverse at the end will be faster and more readable. –  Marc-André Lafortune Nov 5 '12 at 1:20

Just a quick thing, that denotes the intent of descending order.

descending = -1
a.sort_by { |h| h[:bar] * descending }

(Will think of a better way in the mean time) ;)

EDIT

a.sort_by { |h| h[:bar] }.reverse!
share|improve this answer
    
Pablo, nice job on finding a better way! See the benchmark I did. –  the Tin Man Apr 16 '10 at 6:25
    
the first method is faster (though maybe uglier) because it only loops once. As for the second, you don't need the !, that's for inplace operations. –  tokland Nov 19 '10 at 12:13
2  
If you don't use the bang after reverse you won't be reversing the array but creating another one that's reversed. –  Pablo Fernandez Nov 19 '10 at 15:17
1  
this works for numbers, but not other types like strings –  user102008 Sep 28 '11 at 19:33

What about:

 a.sort {|x,y| y[:bar]<=>x[:bar]}

edit

It works!!

irb
>> a = [
?>   { :foo => 'foo', :bar => 2 },
?>   { :foo => 'foo', :bar => 3 },
?>   { :foo => 'foo', :bar => 5 },
?> ]
=> [{:bar=>2, :foo=>"foo"}, {:bar=>3, :foo=>"foo"}, {:bar=>5, :foo=>"foo"}]

>>  a.sort {|x,y| y[:bar]<=>x[:bar]}
=> [{:bar=>5, :foo=>"foo"}, {:bar=>3, :foo=>"foo"}, {:bar=>2, :foo=>"foo"}]
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah it actually works, but I think the PO wants to show intent with the code (he has a working solution already). –  Pablo Fernandez Apr 15 '10 at 1:42
    
@Pablo Ya veo.. y que mejor manera de mostrar sus intenciones que comparando directamente un elemento con otro ;) –  OscarRyz Apr 15 '10 at 1:44
    
@Oscar parece que es cuestion de gustos nomas :D –  Pablo Fernandez Apr 15 '10 at 1:51

Regarding the benchmark suite mentioned... these results also hold for sorted arrays. sort_by / reverse it is :)

Eg:

# foo.rb
require 'benchmark'

NUM_RUNS = 1000

# arr = []
arr1 = 3000.times.map { { num: rand(1000) } }
arr2 = 3000.times.map { |n| { num: n } }.reverse

Benchmark.bm(20) do |x|
  { 'randomized'     => arr1,
    'sorted'         => arr2 }.each do |label, arr|
    puts '---------------------------------------------------'
    puts label

    x.report('sort_by / reverse') {
      NUM_RUNS.times { arr.sort_by { |h| h[:num] }.reverse }
    }
    x.report('sort_by -') {
      NUM_RUNS.times { arr.sort_by { |h| -h[:num] } }
    }
  end
end

And the results:

$: ruby foo.rb
                           user     system      total        real
---------------------------------------------------
randomized
sort_by / reverse      1.680000   0.010000   1.690000 (  1.682051)
sort_by -              1.830000   0.000000   1.830000 (  1.830359)
---------------------------------------------------
sorted
sort_by / reverse      0.400000   0.000000   0.400000 (  0.402990)
sort_by -              0.500000   0.000000   0.500000 (  0.499350)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.