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What is the proper way to remove elements from a C++ vector while iterating through it? I am iterating over an array and want to remove some elements that match a certain condition. I've been told that it's a bad thing to modify it during traversal.

I guess I should also mention that this is an array of pointers that I need to free before removing them.

EDIT:

So here's a snippet of my code.


void RoutingProtocolImpl::removeAllInfinity()
{
  dv.erase(std::remove_if(dv.begin(), dv.end(), hasInfCost), dv.end()); 
}

bool RoutingProtocolImpl::hasInfCost(RoutingProtocolImpl::dv_entry *entry)
{
  if (entry->link_cost == INFINITY_COST)
  {
    free(entry);
    return true;
  }
  else
  {
    return false;
  }
}

I'm getting the following error when compiling:


RoutingProtocolImpl.cc:368: error: argument of type bool (RoutingProtocolImpl::)(RoutingProtocolImpl::dv_entry*)' does not matchbool (RoutingProtocolImpl::*)(RoutingProtocolImpl::dv_entry*)'

Sorry, I'm kind of a C++ newb.

share|improve this question
    
Shouldn't use delete instead of free ? free is a C mechanism and should not be mixed up with Object code. –  Matthieu M. Apr 15 '10 at 6:44
    
Furthermore, if you have a vector<T*> and the vector has ownership of the objects, consider using boost::ptr_vector<T> instead, this way you'll make sure not to leak ;) The interface is very similar to a vector<T>, it just provides handling of pointers and ownership under the hood. –  Matthieu M. Apr 15 '10 at 6:45
    
@garsh0p: this and your previous question (stackoverflow.com/questions/2642671/…) are pretty much identical (looks copy and pasted). Please don't do that. If you want to add more detail to a question edit your existing one, or just add a comment to your question. –  Evan Teran Apr 15 '10 at 14:44
    
@Evan Teran: I was told by Brian R. Bondy below to create a new question... –  garsh0p Apr 17 '10 at 6:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted
bool IsEven (int i) 
{ 
  return (i%2) == 0; 
}

//...

std::vector<int> v;
v.push_back(1);
v.push_back(2);
v.push_back(3);
v.push_back(4);
v.erase(std::remove_if(v.begin(),v.end(),IsEven), v.end()); 
//v now contains 1 and 3
share|improve this answer
    
If my vector is of pointers that need to be freed after they are removed, how would I do this? –  garsh0p Apr 15 '10 at 3:23
1  
@user219847 You could wrap your pointers in a Boost:smart_ptr object. –  wheaties Apr 15 '10 at 3:28
    
@wheaties: Agree it's much cleaner to work with smart pointers when using STL containers especially. –  Brian R. Bondy Apr 15 '10 at 3:30
    
in the example, the predicate IsEven could handle freeing the memory that's pointed to... It's a matter of what makes the most sense for the app you're developing... I tend to prefer for_each as its more readable -- for me. –  Jason D Apr 15 '10 at 3:30
    
@user219847: You could do what wheaties said, you could use boost's ptr_container library, or you could use std::partition (See my answer) –  Billy ONeal Apr 15 '10 at 3:30

The vector's erase() method returns a new iterator that can be used to continue iterating:

std::vecor<MyClass> v = ...;
std::vecor<MyClass>::iterator it = v.begin();
while (it != v.end()) {
  if (some_condition(*it)) {
    it->cleanup(); // or something
    it = v.erase(it);
  }
  else {
    ++it;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for actually answering the question, instead of describing a totally different approach. The question specifically said while iterating through it –  kibibu Apr 15 '10 at 3:32
1  
Note: absolutely make sure you remember to assign it to the iterator returned by erase! Easy to miss, and the code still looks ok without it, but it dies horribly. –  kibibu Apr 15 '10 at 3:34
2  
+1 for the same reason as kibibu, but one should prefer algorithm calls over explicit loops. –  Billy ONeal Apr 15 '10 at 3:35

Same as Brian R. Bondy's answer, but I'd use a functor rather than a function pointer because compilers are better at inlining them:

struct IsEven : public std::unary_function<int, bool>
{
    bool operator()(int i) 
    { 
      return (i%2) == 0; 
    };
}

//...

std::erase(std::remove_if(v.begin(),v.end(),IsEven()), v.end());

EDIT: In response to If my vector is of pointers that need to be freed after they are removed, how would I do this?

struct IsEven : public std::unary_function<int, bool>
{
    bool operator()(int i) 
    { 
      return (i%2) == 0; 
    };
}

struct DeletePointer : public std::unary_function<myPointedType *, void>
{
    void operator()(myPointedType * toDelete)
    {
        delete toDelete;
    };
}

//...

typedef std::vector<something>::iterator Iterator_T;
Iterator_t splitPoint = std::partition(v.begin(),v.end(),IsEven());
std::for_each(v.begin(), splitPoint, DeletePointer());
v.erase(v.begin(), splitPoint);
share|improve this answer
    
@GMan: Thanks. Fixed :) –  Billy ONeal Apr 15 '10 at 3:34

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