Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Say I create one object and add it to my ArrayList. If I then create another object with exactly the same constructor input, will the contains() method evaluate the two objects to be the same? Assume the constructor doesn't do anything funny with the input, and the variables stored in both objects are identical.

ArrayList<Thing> basket = new ArrayList<Thing>();  
Thing thing = new Thing(100);  
basket.add(thing);  
Thing another = new Thing(100);  
basket.contains(another); // true or false?

class Thing {  
    public int value;  

    public Thing (int x) {
        value = x;
    }

    equals (Thing x) {
        if (x.value == value) return true;
        return false;
    }
}

Is this how the class should be implemented to have contains() return true?

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 151 down vote accepted

ArrayList implements the List Interface.

If you look at the Javadoc for List at the contains method you will see that it uses the equals() method to evaluate if two objects are the same.

share|improve this answer
33  
Just in case you plan to override equals(), make sure you override hashcode() method as well. If you wont, things may not work as expected while using Collections? –  Mohd Farid Apr 15 '10 at 9:06
22  
This is a correct answer, but note that you need to change your equals method to accept an Object rather than a Thing. If you don't, your equals method won't be used. :) –  mdierker Apr 23 '13 at 20:13

I think that right implementations should be

public class Thing
{
    public int value;  

    public Thing (int x)
    {
        this.value = x;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object object)
    {
        boolean sameSame = false;

        if (object != null && object instanceof Thing)
        {
            sameSame = this.value == ((Thing) object).value;
        }

        return sameSame;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
where is the implementation of hashcode method ? –  Stephan Aug 26 '13 at 12:13
3  
Yeah, you're right @Alex ! Feel free to add it ;) –  ChristopheCVB Aug 31 '13 at 3:51

The ArrayList uses the equals method implemented in the class (your case Thing class) to do the equals comparison.

share|improve this answer
    
thx. much apprechiated! –  Andrew Tobey Apr 26 at 12:02

Generally you should also override hashCode() each time you override equals(), even if just for the performance boost. HashCode() decides which 'bucket' your object gets sorted into when doing a comparison, so any two objects which equal() evaluates to true should return the same hashCode value(). I cannot remember the default behavior of hashCode() (if it returns 0 then your code should work but slowly, but if it returns the address then your code will fail). I do remember a bunch of times when my code failed because I forgot to override hashCode() though. :)

share|improve this answer

It uses the equals method on the objects. So unless Thing overrides equals and uses the variables stored in the objects for comparison, it will not return true on the contains() method.

share|improve this answer
class Thing {  
    public int value;  

    public Thing (int x) {
        value = x;
    }

    equals (Thing x) {
        if (x.value == value) return true;
        return false;
    }
}

You must write:

class Thing {  
    public int value;  

    public Thing (int x) {
        value = x;
    }

    public boolean equals (Object o) {
    Thing x = (Thing) o;
        if (x.value == value) return true;
        return false;
    }
}

Now it works ;)

share|improve this answer
2  
you should not do Thing x = (Thing) o; without first checking if the other object is null –  steelshark Jun 19 '13 at 14:30

Other posters have addressed the question about how contains() works.

An equally important aspect of your question is how to properly implement equals(). And the answer to this is really dependent on what constitutes object equality for this particular class. In the example you provided, if you have two different objects that both have x=5, are they equal? It really depends on what you are trying to do.

If you are only interested in object equality, then the default implementation of .equals() (the one provided by Object) uses identity only (i.e. this == other). If that's what you want, then just don't implement equals() on your class (let it inherit from Object). The code you wrote, while kind of correct if you are going for identity, would never appear in a real class b/c it provides no benefit over using the default Object.equals() implementation.

If you are just getting started with this stuff, I strongly recommend the Effective Java book by Joshua Bloch. It's a great read, and covers this sort of thing (plus how to correctly implement equals() when you are trying to do more than identity based comparisons)

share|improve this answer
    
For my purpose I was trying to see if an object of equal value was in the ArrayList. I suppose it is a sort of hack. Thank you for the book recommendation –  mvid Apr 15 '10 at 6:01

Just wanted to note that the following implementation is wrong when value is not a primitive type:

public class Thing
{
    public Object value;  

    public Thing (Object x)
    {
        this.value = x;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object object)
    {
        boolean sameSame = false;

        if (object != null && object instanceof Thing)
        {
            sameSame = this.value == ((Thing) object).value;
        }

        return sameSame;
    }
}

In that case I propose the following:

public class Thing {
    public Object value;  

    public Thing (Object x) {
        value = x;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object object) {

        if (object != null && object instanceof Thing) {
            Thing thing = (Thing) object;
            if (value == null) {
                return (thing.value == null);
            }
            else {
                return value.equals(thing.value);
            }
        }

        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.