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Recently posted a question regarding the HttpClient over Https (found here). I've made some headway, but I've run into new issues. As with my last problem, I can't seem to find an example anywhere that works for me. Basically, I want my client to accept any certificate (because I'm only ever pointing to one server) but I keep getting a javax.net.ssl.SSLException: Not trusted server certificate exception.

So this is what I have:

public void connect() throws A_WHOLE_BUNCH_OF_EXCEPTIONS {

    HttpPost post = new HttpPost(new URI(PROD_URL));
    post.setEntity(new StringEntity(BODY));

    KeyStore trusted = KeyStore.getInstance("BKS");
    trusted.load(null, "".toCharArray());
    SSLSocketFactory sslf = new SSLSocketFactory(trusted);
    sslf.setHostnameVerifier(SSLSocketFactory.ALLOW_ALL_HOSTNAME_VERIFIER);

    SchemeRegistry schemeRegistry = new SchemeRegistry();
    schemeRegistry.register(new Scheme ("https", sslf, 443));
    SingleClientConnManager cm = new SingleClientConnManager(post.getParams(),
            schemeRegistry);

    HttpClient client = new DefaultHttpClient(cm, post.getParams());
    HttpResponse result = client.execute(post);
}

And here's the error I'm getting:

W/System.err(  901): javax.net.ssl.SSLException: Not trusted server certificate
W/System.err(  901):    at org.apache.harmony.xnet.provider.jsse.OpenSSLSocketImpl.startHandshake(OpenSSLSocketImpl.java:360)
W/System.err(  901):    at org.apache.http.conn.ssl.AbstractVerifier.verify(AbstractVerifier.java:92)
W/System.err(  901):    at org.apache.http.conn.ssl.SSLSocketFactory.connectSocket(SSLSocketFactory.java:321)
W/System.err(  901):    at org.apache.http.impl.conn.DefaultClientConnectionOperator.openConnection(DefaultClientConnectionOperator.java:129)
W/System.err(  901):    at org.apache.http.impl.conn.AbstractPoolEntry.open(AbstractPoolEntry.java:164)
W/System.err(  901):    at org.apache.http.impl.conn.AbstractPooledConnAdapter.open(AbstractPooledConnAdapter.java:119)
W/System.err(  901):    at org.apache.http.impl.client.DefaultRequestDirector.execute(DefaultRequestDirector.java:348)
W/System.err(  901):    at org.apache.http.impl.client.AbstractHttpClient.execute(AbstractHttpClient.java:555)
W/System.err(  901):    at org.apache.http.impl.client.AbstractHttpClient.execute(AbstractHttpClient.java:487)
W/System.err(  901):    at org.apache.http.impl.client.AbstractHttpClient.execute(AbstractHttpClient.java:465)
W/System.err(  901):    at me.harrisonlee.test.ssl.MainActivity.connect(MainActivity.java:129)
W/System.err(  901):    at me.harrisonlee.test.ssl.MainActivity.access$0(MainActivity.java:77)
W/System.err(  901):    at me.harrisonlee.test.ssl.MainActivity$2.run(MainActivity.java:49)
W/System.err(  901): Caused by: java.security.cert.CertificateException: java.security.InvalidAlgorithmParameterException: the trust anchors set is empty
W/System.err(  901):    at org.apache.harmony.xnet.provider.jsse.TrustManagerImpl.checkServerTrusted(TrustManagerImpl.java:157)
W/System.err(  901):    at org.apache.harmony.xnet.provider.jsse.OpenSSLSocketImpl.startHandshake(OpenSSLSocketImpl.java:355)
W/System.err(  901):    ... 12 more
W/System.err(  901): Caused by: java.security.InvalidAlgorithmParameterException: the trust anchors set is empty
W/System.err(  901):    at java.security.cert.PKIXParameters.checkTrustAnchors(PKIXParameters.java:645)
W/System.err(  901):    at java.security.cert.PKIXParameters.<init>(PKIXParameters.java:89)
W/System.err(  901):    at org.apache.harmony.xnet.provider.jsse.TrustManagerImpl.<init>(TrustManagerImpl.java:89)
W/System.err(  901):    at org.apache.harmony.xnet.provider.jsse.TrustManagerFactoryImpl.engineGetTrustManagers(TrustManagerFactoryImpl.java:134)
W/System.err(  901):    at javax.net.ssl.TrustManagerFactory.getTrustManagers(TrustManagerFactory.java:226)
W/System.err(  901):    at org.apache.http.conn.ssl.SSLSocketFactory.createTrustManagers(SSLSocketFactory.java:263)
W/System.err(  901):    at org.apache.http.conn.ssl.SSLSocketFactory.<init>(SSLSocketFactory.java:190)
W/System.err(  901):    at org.apache.http.conn.ssl.SSLSocketFactory.<init>(SSLSocketFactory.java:216)
W/System.err(  901):    at me.harrisonlee.test.ssl.MainActivity.connect(MainActivity.java:107)
W/System.err(  901):    ... 2 more
share|improve this question
9  
I needed to do this for internal use. I really hope you are not letting users outside your company use your app since you have opened it up to man in the middle attack and they would then be vulnerable to someone hijacking their session. nonetheless, I need to do this temporary for some testing until I get the real certificate in hand.....hopefully you are doing it for the same temporary kind of reason or the app is only used internally. –  Dean Hiller Oct 4 '11 at 21:26
    
I tried these solutions on 4.3 apache http client, but they are mostly deprecated. Here is not deprecated solution: stackoverflow.com/a/18941950/2039471 –  Alexander Chzhen Sep 22 '13 at 12:57

16 Answers 16

up vote 255 down vote accepted

Note: Do not implement this in production code you are ever going to use on a network you do not entirely trust. Especially anything going over the public internet.

Your question is just what I want to know. After I did some searches, the conclusion is as follows.

In HttpClient way, you should create a custom class from org.apache.http.conn.ssl.SSLSocketFactory, not the one org.apache.http.conn.ssl.SSLSocketFactory itself. Some clues can be found in this post Custom SSL handling stopped working on Android 2.2 FroYo.

An example is like ...

import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.Socket;
import java.net.UnknownHostException;
import java.security.KeyManagementException;
import java.security.KeyStore;
import java.security.KeyStoreException;
import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException;
import java.security.UnrecoverableKeyException;
import java.security.cert.CertificateException;
import java.security.cert.X509Certificate;

import javax.net.ssl.SSLContext;
import javax.net.ssl.TrustManager;
import javax.net.ssl.X509TrustManager;

import org.apache.http.conn.ssl.SSLSocketFactory;
public class MySSLSocketFactory extends SSLSocketFactory {
    SSLContext sslContext = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");

    public MySSLSocketFactory(KeyStore truststore) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, KeyManagementException, KeyStoreException, UnrecoverableKeyException {
        super(truststore);

        TrustManager tm = new X509TrustManager() {
            public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] chain, String authType) throws CertificateException {
            }

            public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] chain, String authType) throws CertificateException {
            }

            public X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
                return null;
            }
        };

        sslContext.init(null, new TrustManager[] { tm }, null);
    }

    @Override
    public Socket createSocket(Socket socket, String host, int port, boolean autoClose) throws IOException, UnknownHostException {
        return sslContext.getSocketFactory().createSocket(socket, host, port, autoClose);
    }

    @Override
    public Socket createSocket() throws IOException {
        return sslContext.getSocketFactory().createSocket();
    }
}

and use this class while creating instance of HttpClient.

public HttpClient getNewHttpClient() {
    try {
        KeyStore trustStore = KeyStore.getInstance(KeyStore.getDefaultType());
        trustStore.load(null, null);

        SSLSocketFactory sf = new MySSLSocketFactory(trustStore);
        sf.setHostnameVerifier(SSLSocketFactory.ALLOW_ALL_HOSTNAME_VERIFIER);

        HttpParams params = new BasicHttpParams();
        HttpProtocolParams.setVersion(params, HttpVersion.HTTP_1_1);
        HttpProtocolParams.setContentCharset(params, HTTP.UTF_8);

        SchemeRegistry registry = new SchemeRegistry();
        registry.register(new Scheme("http", PlainSocketFactory.getSocketFactory(), 80));
        registry.register(new Scheme("https", sf, 443));

        ClientConnectionManager ccm = new ThreadSafeClientConnManager(params, registry);

        return new DefaultHttpClient(ccm, params);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        return new DefaultHttpClient();
    }
}

BTW, the link below is for someone who is looking for HttpURLConnection solution. Https Connection Android

I have tested the above two kinds of solutions on froyo, and they all work like a charm in my cases. Finally, using HttpURLConnection may face the redirect problems, but this is beyond the topic.

Note: Before you decide to trust all certificates, you probably should know the site full well and won't be harmful of it to end-user.

Indeed, the risk you take should be considered carefully, including the effect of hacker's mock site mentioned in the following comments that I deeply appreciated. In some situation, although it might be hard to take care of all certificates, you'd better know the implicit drawbacks to trust all of them.

share|improve this answer
95  
this answer should probably note that trusting all certificates is horribly insecure and nullifies the entire purpose of ssl... –  yanokwa Jul 25 '11 at 0:59
17  
@sweeney - Except that it's not guaranteed that you are talking to the server you think you are. If someone has mucked up a DNS server you could be communicating an encryption key with a hacker's server. –  Richard Szalay Oct 11 '11 at 14:35
8  
@sweeney In other words you are now liable to man-in-the-middle attacks. You should also note that that code doesn't meet the specification: check the Javadoc. getAcceptedIssuers() isn't allowed to return null. –  EJP Mar 9 '12 at 0:29
18  
-1 Because it is a terrible idea to accept all certificates. It is too bad that there are so many blogs and tutorials that happily guide Java developers along the path of doing the wrong thing. –  Tim Bender May 4 '12 at 16:47
25  
+1 Because I needed a quick solution for debugging purposes only. I would not use this in production due to the security concerns others have mentioned, but this was exactly what I needed for testing. Thank you! –  Danation Oct 24 '12 at 19:23

You basically have four potential solutions to fix a "Not Trusted" exception on Android using httpclient:

  1. Trust all certificates. Don't do this, unless you really know what you're doing.
  2. Create a custom SSLSocketFactory that trusts only your certificate. This works as long as you know exactly which servers you're going to connect to, but as soon as you need to connect to a new server with a different SSL certificate, you'll need to update your app.
  3. Create a keystore file that contains Android's "master list" of certificates, then add your own. If any of those certs expire down the road, you are responsible for updating them in your app. I can't think of a reason to do this.
  4. Create a custom SSLSocketFactory that uses the built-in certificate KeyStore, but falls back on an alternate KeyStore for anything that fails to verify with the default.

This answer uses solution #4, which seems to me to be the most robust.

The solution is to use an SSLSocketFactory that can accept multiple KeyStores, allowing you to supply your own KeyStore with your own certificates. This allows you to load additional top-level certificates such as Thawte that might be missing on some Android devices. It also allows you to load your own self-signed certificates as well. It will use the built-in default device certificates first, and fall back on your additional certificates only as necessary.

First, you'll want to determine which cert you are missing in your KeyStore. Run the following command:

openssl s_client -connect www.yourserver.com:443

And you'll see output like the following:

Certificate chain
 0 s:/O=www.yourserver.com/OU=Go to 
   https://www.thawte.com/repository/index.html/OU=Thawte SSL123 
   certificate/OU=Domain Validated/CN=www.yourserver.com
   i:/C=US/O=Thawte, Inc./OU=Domain Validated SSL/CN=Thawte DV SSL CA
 1 s:/C=US/O=Thawte, Inc./OU=Domain Validated SSL/CN=Thawte DV SSL CA
   i:/C=US/O=thawte, Inc./OU=Certification Services Division/OU=(c) 
   2006 thawte, Inc. - For authorized use only/CN=thawte Primary Root CA

As you can see, our root certificate is from Thawte. Go to your provider's website and find the corresponding certificate. For us, it was here, and you can see that the one we needed was the one Copyright 2006.

If you're using a self-signed certificate, you didn't need to do the previous step since you already have your signing certificate.

Then, create a keystore file containing the missing signing certificate. Crazybob has details how to do this on Android, but the idea is to do the following:

export CLASSPATH=bcprov-jdk16-145.jar
CERTSTORE=res/raw/mystore.bks
if [ -a $CERTSTORE ]; then
    rm $CERTSTORE || exit 1
fi
keytool \
      -import \
      -v \
      -trustcacerts \
      -alias 0 \
      -file <(openssl x509 -in mycert.pem) \
      -keystore $CERTSTORE \
      -storetype BKS \
      -provider org.bouncycastle.jce.provider.BouncyCastleProvider \
      -providerpath /usr/share/java/bcprov.jar \
      -storepass some-password

You'll notice that the above script places the result in res/raw/mystore.bks. Now you have a file that you'll load into your Android app that provides the missing certificate(s).

To do this, register your SSLSocketFactory for the SSL scheme:

final SchemeRegistry schemeRegistry = new SchemeRegistry();
schemeRegistry.register(new Scheme("http", PlainSocketFactory.getSocketFactory(), 80));
schemeRegistry.register(new Scheme("https", createAdditionalCertsSSLSocketFactory(), 443));

// and then however you create your connection manager, I use ThreadSafeClientConnManager
final HttpParams params = new BasicHttpParams();
...
final ThreadSafeClientConnManager cm = new ThreadSafeClientConnManager(params,schemeRegistry);

To create your SSLSocketFactory:

protected org.apache.http.conn.ssl.SSLSocketFactory createAdditionalCertsSSLSocketFactory() {
    try {
        final KeyStore ks = KeyStore.getInstance("BKS");

        // the bks file we generated above
        final InputStream in = context.getResources().openRawResource( R.raw.mystore);  
        try {
            // don't forget to put the password used above in strings.xml/mystore_password
            ks.load(in, context.getString( R.string.mystore_password ).toCharArray());
        } finally {
            in.close();
        }

        return new AdditionalKeyStoresSSLSocketFactory(ks);

    } catch( Exception e ) {
        throw new RuntimeException(e);
    }
}

And finally, the AdditionalKeyStoresSSLSocketFactory code, which accepts your new KeyStore and checks if the built-in KeyStore fails to validate an SSL certificate:

/**
 * Allows you to trust certificates from additional KeyStores in addition to
 * the default KeyStore
 */
public class AdditionalKeyStoresSSLSocketFactory extends SSLSocketFactory {
    protected SSLContext sslContext = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");

    public AdditionalKeyStoresSSLSocketFactory(KeyStore keyStore) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, KeyManagementException, KeyStoreException, UnrecoverableKeyException {
        super(null, null, null, null, null, null);
        sslContext.init(null, new TrustManager[]{new AdditionalKeyStoresTrustManager(keyStore)}, null);
    }

    @Override
    public Socket createSocket(Socket socket, String host, int port, boolean autoClose) throws IOException {
        return sslContext.getSocketFactory().createSocket(socket, host, port, autoClose);
    }

    @Override
    public Socket createSocket() throws IOException {
        return sslContext.getSocketFactory().createSocket();
    }



    /**
     * Based on http://download.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/guide/security/jsse/JSSERefGuide.html#X509TrustManager
     */
    public static class AdditionalKeyStoresTrustManager implements X509TrustManager {

        protected ArrayList<X509TrustManager> x509TrustManagers = new ArrayList<X509TrustManager>();


        protected AdditionalKeyStoresTrustManager(KeyStore... additionalkeyStores) {
            final ArrayList<TrustManagerFactory> factories = new ArrayList<TrustManagerFactory>();

            try {
                // The default Trustmanager with default keystore
                final TrustManagerFactory original = TrustManagerFactory.getInstance(TrustManagerFactory.getDefaultAlgorithm());
                original.init((KeyStore) null);
                factories.add(original);

                for( KeyStore keyStore : additionalkeyStores ) {
                    final TrustManagerFactory additionalCerts = TrustManagerFactory.getInstance(TrustManagerFactory.getDefaultAlgorithm());
                    additionalCerts.init(keyStore);
                    factories.add(additionalCerts);
                }

            } catch (Exception e) {
                throw new RuntimeException(e);
            }



            /*
             * Iterate over the returned trustmanagers, and hold on
             * to any that are X509TrustManagers
             */
            for (TrustManagerFactory tmf : factories)
                for( TrustManager tm : tmf.getTrustManagers() )
                    if (tm instanceof X509TrustManager)
                        x509TrustManagers.add( (X509TrustManager)tm );


            if( x509TrustManagers.size()==0 )
                throw new RuntimeException("Couldn't find any X509TrustManagers");

        }

        /*
         * Delegate to the default trust manager.
         */
        public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] chain, String authType) throws CertificateException {
            final X509TrustManager defaultX509TrustManager = x509TrustManagers.get(0);
            defaultX509TrustManager.checkClientTrusted(chain, authType);
        }

        /*
         * Loop over the trustmanagers until we find one that accepts our server
         */
        public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] chain, String authType) throws CertificateException {
            for( X509TrustManager tm : x509TrustManagers ) {
                try {
                    tm.checkServerTrusted(chain,authType);
                    return;
                } catch( CertificateException e ) {
                    // ignore
                }
            }
            throw new CertificateException();
        }

        public X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
            final ArrayList<X509Certificate> list = new ArrayList<X509Certificate>();
            for( X509TrustManager tm : x509TrustManagers )
                list.addAll(Arrays.asList(tm.getAcceptedIssuers()));
            return list.toArray(new X509Certificate[list.size()]);
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Hey @emmby, this seems to be the perfect answer for my problem, but I still get no SSL connection. Can you please take a look at it? http://stackoverflow.com/questions/7822381/need-help-understanding-certificate-‌​chains –  elton Oct 20 '11 at 19:54
    
Thanks for the great writeup @emmby! I'm sometimes getting a really long delay and then a javax.net.ssl.SSLException: Read error:. Any idea? How can I set a timeout if the solution is same as stackoverflow.com/questions/5909308/android-2-3-4-ssl-problem? –  Edwin Evans Nov 15 '11 at 15:53
    
Edwin, use HttpConnectionParams.setConnectionTimeout(params, TIMEOUT_CONNECTION); and HttpConnectionParams.setSoTimeout(params, TIMEOUT_SOCKET); in my class the two values are Constants. –  Someone Somewhere Mar 1 '12 at 22:35
1  
@emmby, could you tell where should I put this code export CLASSPATH=bcprov-jdk16-145.jar CERTSTORE=res/raw/mystore.bks if [ -a $CERTSTORE ]; then rm $CERTSTORE || exit 1 fi keytool \ -import \ -v \ -trustcacerts \ -alias 0 \ -file <(openssl x509 -in mycert.pem) \ -keystore $CERTSTORE \ -storetype BKS \ -provider org.bouncycastle.jce.provider.BouncyCastleProvider \ -providerpath /usr/share/java/bcprov.jar \ -storepass some-password –  Rikki Tikki Tavi Sep 11 '12 at 16:05
1  
Hey @emmby. I am using your solution in my app and using self signed certificate of my server but getting a CertificateException() in checkServerTrusted() method. I tried commenting that throw exception, and it works. if it does not validate my server cert then can i handle it in other way, Can you please guide what is the best solution in this case? –  Ankit Aug 23 '13 at 7:23

This is a bad idea. Trusting any certificate is only (very) slightly better than using no SSL at all. When you say "I want my client to accept any certificate (because I'm only ever pointing to one server)" you are assuming this means that somehow pointing to "one server" is safe, which it's not on a public network.

You are completely open to a man-in-the-middle attack by trusting any certificate. Anyone can proxy your connection by establishing a separate SSL connection with you and with the end server. The MITM then has access to your entire request and response. Unless you didn't really need SSL in the first place (your message has nothing sensitive, and doesn't do authentication) you shouldn't trust all certificates blindly.

You should consider adding the public cert to a jks using keytool, and using that to build your socket factory, such as this:

    KeyStore ks = KeyStore.getInstance("JKS");

    // get user password and file input stream
    char[] password = ("mykspassword")).toCharArray();
    ClassLoader cl = this.getClass().getClassLoader();
    InputStream stream = cl.getResourceAsStream("myjks.jks");
    ks.load(stream, password);
    stream.close();

    SSLContext sc = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");
    KeyManagerFactory kmf = KeyManagerFactory.getInstance("SunX509");
    TrustManagerFactory tmf = TrustManagerFactory.getInstance("SunX509");

    kmf.init(ks, password);
    tmf.init(ks);

    sc.init(kmf.getKeyManagers(), tmf.getTrustManagers(),null);

    return sc.getSocketFactory();

This has one caveat to watch out for. The certificate will expire eventually, and the code will stop working at that time. You can easily determine when this will happen by looking at the cert.

share|improve this answer
2  
If you're not using client-certificate authentication, from the client side, you don't need a keymanager (use null in SSLContext.init). You should also use the default algorithms (KMF/TMF.getDefaultAlgorithm() ), instead of hard-coding SunX509` (more so because the default for TMF is actually PKIX on the Sun/Oracle JVM). –  Bruno Feb 12 '12 at 16:47
    
Exists a ready to use root certificates file? (like browsers do) –  danihp Aug 9 '12 at 9:26

The API of HttpComponents has got changed. It works with the code below.

public static HttpClient getTestHttpClient() {
    try {
        SSLSocketFactory sf = new SSLSocketFactory(new TrustStrategy(){
            @Override
            public boolean isTrusted(X509Certificate[] chain,
                    String authType) throws CertificateException {
                return true;
            }
        }, new AllowAllHostnameVerifier());

        SchemeRegistry registry = new SchemeRegistry();
        registry.register(new Scheme("https",8444, sf));
        ClientConnectionManager ccm = new ThreadSafeClientConnManager(registry);
        return new DefaultHttpClient(ccm);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return new DefaultHttpClient();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Also found a good tutorial.

This solution also doesn't compromise certificate checking and explains how to add the trusted certs in your own keystore.

http://blog.antoine.li/index.php/2010/10/android-trusting-ssl-certificates/

share|improve this answer
    
I tried this blog, and it works for a day and then I get the same error message. Would anybody know why? –  Diego Jul 24 '13 at 2:53

Add this code before the HttpsURLConnection and it will be done. I got it.

private void trustEveryone() { 
    try { 
            HttpsURLConnection.setDefaultHostnameVerifier(new HostnameVerifier(){ 
                    public boolean verify(String hostname, SSLSession session) { 
                            return true; 
                    }}); 
            SSLContext context = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS"); 
            context.init(null, new X509TrustManager[]{new X509TrustManager(){ 
                    public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] chain, 
                                    String authType) throws CertificateException {} 
                    public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] chain, 
                                    String authType) throws CertificateException {} 
                    public X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() { 
                            return new X509Certificate[0]; 
                    }}}, new SecureRandom()); 
            HttpsURLConnection.setDefaultSSLSocketFactory( 
                            context.getSocketFactory()); 
    } catch (Exception e) { // should never happen 
            e.printStackTrace(); 
    } 
} 

I hope this helps you.

share|improve this answer
6  
See the remarks above under the accepted answer. This 'solution' is radically insecure. –  EJP Mar 9 '12 at 0:30

The code above in http://stackoverflow.com/a/6378872/1553004 is correct, except it MUST also call the hostname verifier:

    @Override
public Socket createSocket(Socket socket, String host, int port, boolean autoClose) throws IOException {
    SSLSocket sslSocket = (SSLSocket)sslContext.getSocketFactory().createSocket(socket, host, port, autoClose);
    getHostnameVerifier().verify(host, sslSocket);
    return sslSocket;
}

I signed up to stackoverflow expressly to add this fix. Heed my warning!

share|improve this answer
    
Once you verify the certificate this way on the first connection, what do you do with subsequent connections? Do you leverage the knowledge you gained from the first connection? What if a fake certificate with the same name is used on connection attempt 3? –  jww Aug 13 at 9:42

Here is a much simple version using 4.1.2 httpclient code. This can then be modified to any trust algorithm you see fit.

public static HttpClient getTestHttpClient() {
    try {
        SSLSocketFactory sf = new SSLSocketFactory(new TrustStrategy(){
            @Override
            public boolean isTrusted(X509Certificate[] chain,
                    String authType) throws CertificateException {
                return true;
            }
        });
        SchemeRegistry registry = new SchemeRegistry();
        registry.register(new Scheme("https", 443, sf));
        ClientConnectionManager ccm = new ThreadSafeClientConnManager(registry);
        return new DefaultHttpClient(ccm);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        return new DefaultHttpClient();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I'm looked response from "emmby" (answered Jun 16 '11 at 21:29), item #4: "Create a custom SSLSocketFactory that uses the built-in certificate KeyStore, but falls back on an alternate KeyStore for anything that fails to verify with the default."

This is a simplified implementation. Load the system keystore & merge with application keystore.

public HttpClient getNewHttpClient() {
    try {
        InputStream in = null;
        // Load default system keystore
        KeyStore trusted = KeyStore.getInstance(KeyStore.getDefaultType()); 
        try {
            in = new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(System.getProperty("javax.net.ssl.trustStore"))); // Normally: "/system/etc/security/cacerts.bks"
            trusted.load(in, null); // no password is "changeit"
        } finally {
            if (in != null) {
                in.close();
                in = null;
            }
        }

        // Load application keystore & merge with system
        try {
            KeyStore appTrusted = KeyStore.getInstance("BKS"); 
            in = context.getResources().openRawResource(R.raw.mykeystore);
            appTrusted.load(in, null); // no password is "changeit"
            for (Enumeration<String> e = appTrusted.aliases(); e.hasMoreElements();) {
                final String alias = e.nextElement();
                final KeyStore.Entry entry = appTrusted.getEntry(alias, null);
                trusted.setEntry(System.currentTimeMillis() + ":" + alias, entry, null);
            }
        } finally {
            if (in != null) {
                in.close();
                in = null;
            }
        }

        HttpParams params = new BasicHttpParams();
        HttpProtocolParams.setVersion(params, HttpVersion.HTTP_1_1);
        HttpProtocolParams.setContentCharset(params, HTTP.UTF_8);

        SSLSocketFactory sf = new SSLSocketFactory(trusted);
        sf.setHostnameVerifier(SSLSocketFactory.BROWSER_COMPATIBLE_HOSTNAME_VERIFIER);

        SchemeRegistry registry = new SchemeRegistry();
        registry.register(new Scheme("http", PlainSocketFactory.getSocketFactory(), 80));
        registry.register(new Scheme("https", sf, 443));

        ClientConnectionManager ccm = new ThreadSafeClientConnManager(params, registry);

        return new DefaultHttpClient(ccm, params);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        return new DefaultHttpClient();
    }
}

A simple mode to convert from JKS to BKS:

keytool -importkeystore -destkeystore cacerts.bks -deststoretype BKS -providerclass org.bouncycastle.jce.provider.BouncyCastleProvider -providerpath bcprov-jdk16-141.jar -deststorepass changeit -srcstorepass changeit -srckeystore $JAVA_HOME/jre/lib/security/cacerts -srcstoretype JKS -noprompt

*Note: In Android 4.0 (ICS) the Trust Store has changed, more info: http://nelenkov.blogspot.com.es/2011/12/ics-trust-store-implementation.html

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For those who would like to allow all certificates to work (for testing purposes) over OAuth, follow these steps:

1) Download the source code of the Android OAuth API here: https://github.com/kaeppler/signpost

2) Find the file "CommonsHttpOAuthProvider" class

3) Change it as below:

public class CommonsHttpOAuthProvider extends AbstractOAuthProvider {

private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

private transient HttpClient httpClient;

public CommonsHttpOAuthProvider(String requestTokenEndpointUrl, String accessTokenEndpointUrl,
        String authorizationWebsiteUrl) {
    super(requestTokenEndpointUrl, accessTokenEndpointUrl, authorizationWebsiteUrl);


    //this.httpClient = new DefaultHttpClient();//Version implemented and that throws the famous "javax.net.ssl.SSLException: Not trusted server certificate" if the certificate is not signed with a CA
    this.httpClient = MySSLSocketFactory.getNewHttpClient();//This will work with all certificates (for testing purposes only)
}

The "MySSLSocketFactory" above is based on the accepted answer. To make it even easier, here goes the complete class:

package com.netcomps.oauth_example;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.Socket;
import java.net.UnknownHostException;
import java.security.KeyManagementException;
import java.security.KeyStore;
import java.security.KeyStoreException;
import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException;
import java.security.UnrecoverableKeyException;
import java.security.cert.CertificateException;
import java.security.cert.X509Certificate;

import javax.net.ssl.SSLContext;
import javax.net.ssl.TrustManager;
import javax.net.ssl.X509TrustManager;

import org.apache.http.HttpVersion;
import org.apache.http.client.HttpClient;
import org.apache.http.conn.ClientConnectionManager;
import org.apache.http.conn.scheme.PlainSocketFactory;
import org.apache.http.conn.scheme.Scheme;
import org.apache.http.conn.scheme.SchemeRegistry;
import org.apache.http.conn.ssl.SSLSocketFactory;
import org.apache.http.impl.client.DefaultHttpClient;
import org.apache.http.impl.conn.tsccm.ThreadSafeClientConnManager;
import org.apache.http.params.BasicHttpParams;
import org.apache.http.params.HttpParams;
import org.apache.http.params.HttpProtocolParams;
import org.apache.http.protocol.HTTP;

//http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2642777/trusting-all-certificates-using-httpclient-over-https
public class MySSLSocketFactory extends SSLSocketFactory {

    SSLContext sslContext = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");

public MySSLSocketFactory(KeyStore truststore) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, KeyManagementException, KeyStoreException, UnrecoverableKeyException {

    super(truststore);
    TrustManager tm = new X509TrustManager() {

        @Override
        public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] chain, String authType) throws CertificateException {
        }

        @Override
        public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] chain, String authType) throws CertificateException {
        }

        @Override
        public X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
            return null;
        }
    };

    sslContext.init(null, new TrustManager[] { tm }, null);
}

@Override
public Socket createSocket(Socket socket, String host, int port, boolean autoClose) throws IOException, UnknownHostException {
    return sslContext.getSocketFactory().createSocket(socket, host, port, autoClose);
}

@Override
public Socket createSocket() throws IOException {
    return sslContext.getSocketFactory().createSocket();
}



public static HttpClient getNewHttpClient() {

    try {
        KeyStore trustStore = KeyStore.getInstance(KeyStore.getDefaultType());
        trustStore.load(null, null);

        SSLSocketFactory sf = new MySSLSocketFactory(trustStore);
        sf.setHostnameVerifier(SSLSocketFactory.ALLOW_ALL_HOSTNAME_VERIFIER);

        HttpParams params = new BasicHttpParams();
        HttpProtocolParams.setVersion(params, HttpVersion.HTTP_1_1);
        HttpProtocolParams.setContentCharset(params, HTTP.UTF_8);

        SchemeRegistry registry = new SchemeRegistry();
        registry.register(new Scheme("http", PlainSocketFactory.getSocketFactory(), 80));
        registry.register(new Scheme("https", sf, 443));

        ClientConnectionManager ccm = new ThreadSafeClientConnManager(params, registry);

        return new DefaultHttpClient(ccm, params);

    } catch (Exception e) {
        return new DefaultHttpClient();
    }
}

}

Hope this helps someone.

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1  
Why the downvote? That is why I wrote "for testing purposes". I can't understand some people. –  Tiago May 21 '13 at 5:26
    
The question was HttpClient and HTTPS; not OAuth for Android from a GitHub project. –  jww Aug 13 at 9:37

Trusting all certificates was no real alternative for me, so I did the following to get HttpsURLConnection to trust a new certificate (see also http://nelenkov.blogspot.jp/2011/12/using-custom-certificate-trust-store-on.html).

  1. Get the certificate; I got this done by exporting the certificate in Firefox (click on the little lock icon, get certificate details, click export), then used portecle to export a truststore (BKS).

  2. Load the Truststore from /res/raw/geotrust_cert.bks with the following code:

        final KeyStore trustStore = KeyStore.getInstance("BKS");
        final InputStream in = context.getResources().openRawResource(
                R.raw.geotrust_cert);
        trustStore.load(in, null);
    
        final TrustManagerFactory tmf = TrustManagerFactory
                .getInstance(TrustManagerFactory.getDefaultAlgorithm());
        tmf.init(trustStore);
    
        final SSLContext sslCtx = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");
        sslCtx.init(null, tmf.getTrustManagers(),
                new java.security.SecureRandom());
    
        HttpsURLConnection.setDefaultSSLSocketFactory(sslCtx
                .getSocketFactory());
    
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I get this error. IOExceptionjavax.net.ssl.SSLPeerUnverifiedException: No peer certificate. This when doing the actual execute call on the HttpClient after the above setup is done. –  Michael Jun 20 '13 at 22:56

Any body still struggling with StartCom SSL Certificates on Android 2.1 visit https://www.startssl.com/certs/ and download the ca.pem, now in the answer provided by @emmby replace

`export CLASSPATH=bcprov-jdk16-145.jar
 CERTSTORE=res/raw/mystore.bks
      if [ -a $CERTSTORE ]; then
          rm $CERTSTORE || exit 1
      fi
 keytool \
  -import \
  -v \
  -trustcacerts \
  -alias 0 \
  -file <(openssl x509 -in mycert.pem) \
  -keystore $CERTSTORE \
  -storetype BKS \
  -provider org.bouncycastle.jce.provider.BouncyCastleProvider \
  -providerpath /usr/share/java/bcprov.jar \
  -storepass some-password`

with

 `export CLASSPATH=bcprov-jdk16-145.jar
 CERTSTORE=res/raw/mystore.bks
      if [ -a $CERTSTORE ]; then
          rm $CERTSTORE || exit 1
      fi
 keytool \
  -import \
  -v \
  -trustcacerts \
  -alias 0 \
  -file <(openssl x509 -in ca.pem) \
  -keystore $CERTSTORE \
  -storetype BKS \
  -provider org.bouncycastle.jce.provider.BouncyCastleProvider \
  -providerpath /usr/share/java/bcprov.jar \
  -storepass some-password`

Should work out of the box. I was struggling it for over a day even after a perfect answer by @emmby.. Hope this helps someone...

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Daniel's answer was good except I had to change this code...

    SchemeRegistry registry = new SchemeRegistry();
    registry.register(new Scheme("http", PlainSocketFactory.getSocketFactory(), 80));
    registry.register(new Scheme("https", sf, 443));

    ClientConnectionManager ccm = new ThreadSafeClientConnManager(params, registry);

to this code...

    ClientConnectionManager ccm = new ThreadSafeClientConnManager(params, registry);
    SchemeRegistry registry = ccm.getShemeRegistry()
    registry.register(new Scheme("http", PlainSocketFactory.getSocketFactory(), 80));
    registry.register(new Scheme("https", sf, 443));

to get it to work.

share|improve this answer
3  
how should that work? you reference registry before you even created it! –  elton Oct 19 '11 at 9:43
    
hmmm, I must have copied the code wrong and don't have access to it anymore(previous project).....shucks. –  Dean Hiller Dec 6 '11 at 15:32

work with all https

httpClient = new DefaultHttpClient();

SSLContext ctx = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");
X509TrustManager tm = new X509TrustManager() {
    public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] xcs, String string) throws CertificateException { }

    public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] xcs, String string) throws CertificateException { }

    public X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
        return null;
    }
};

ctx.init(null, new TrustManager[]{tm}, null);
SSLSocketFactory ssf = new SSLSocketFactory(ctx, SSLSocketFactory.ALLOW_ALL_HOSTNAME_VERIFIER);

httpClient.getConnectionManager().getSchemeRegistry().register(new Scheme("https", 443, ssf));
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2  
Just repeats the same fallacious insecure non-solution that has already been discussed and dismissed in this thread. –  EJP Apr 25 '13 at 2:06

There a many answers above but I wasn't able to get any of them working correctly (with my limited time), so for anyone else in the same situation you can try the code below which worked perfectly for my java testing purposes:

    public static HttpClient wrapClient(HttpClient base) {
    try {
        SSLContext ctx = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");
        X509TrustManager tm = new X509TrustManager() {
            public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] xcs, String string) throws CertificateException { }

            public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] xcs, String string) throws CertificateException { }

            public X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
                return null;
            }
        };
        ctx.init(null, new TrustManager[]{tm}, null);
        SSLSocketFactory ssf = new SSLSocketFactory(ctx);
        ssf.setHostnameVerifier(SSLSocketFactory.ALLOW_ALL_HOSTNAME_VERIFIER);
        ClientConnectionManager ccm = base.getConnectionManager();
        SchemeRegistry sr = ccm.getSchemeRegistry();
        sr.register(new Scheme("https", ssf, 443));
        return new DefaultHttpClient(ccm, base.getParams());
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        return null;
    }
}

and call like:

DefaultHttpClient baseClient = new DefaultHttpClient();
HttpClient httpClient = wrapClient(baseClient );

Reference: http://tech.chitgoks.com/2011/04/24/how-to-avoid-javax-net-ssl-sslpeerunverifiedexception-peer-not-authenticated-problem-using-apache-httpclient/

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To quote EJP: "Just repeats the same fallacious insecure non-solution that has already been discussed and dismissed in this thread". –  jww Aug 13 at 9:41

Simply use this -

public DefaultHttpClient wrapClient(HttpClient base) {
    try {
        SSLContext ctx = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");
        X509TrustManager tm = new X509TrustManager() {
        public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] xcs, String string) throws CertificateException { }

        public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] xcs, String string) throws CertificateException { }

        public X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
            return null;
        }
    };
    ctx.init(null, new TrustManager[]{tm}, null);
    SSLSocketFactory ssf = new SSLSocketFactory(ctx);
    ssf.setHostnameVerifier(SSLSocketFactory.ALLOW_ALL_HOSTNAME_VERIFIER);
    ClientConnectionManager ccm = base.getConnectionManager();
    SchemeRegistry sr = ccm.getSchemeRegistry();
    sr.register(new Scheme("https", ssf, 443));
    return new DefaultHttpClient(ccm, base.getParams());
} catch (Exception ex) {
    return null;
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
To quote EJP: "Just repeats the same fallacious insecure non-solution that has already been discussed and dismissed in this thread". –  jww Aug 13 at 9:39

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