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Is there a way (in C#) to access the systray? I am not talking about making a notify icon. I want to iterate through the items in the tray (I would guess through the processes but I don't know how to determine what is actually in the tray and what is just a process) and also represent the items with their icons in my own ui.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

How do you feel about Win32 interop? I found C/Win32 code that might do the trick for you. (Actually, it looks like an interesting problem so I might try to tackle it myself, just not now).

The magic appears to be that he gets a handle to the system tray's window:

NotifyWnd = FindWindowEx(SysTray, 0, "TrayNotifyWnd", 0);

Then he sets a hook on its message pump:

hHook=SetWindowsHookEx(WH_CALLWNDPROC,HOOKPROC(MsgProc),
         hInstance,dwExplorerThreadId);

Then during the message pump hook callback, he gets a reference to some pointer data about the window:

TWDataT* twd=(TWDataT*)GetWindowLong(NotifyWnd,0);

The mystery is then his loop:

      pTWIconDataT p=COMCTL32_332(twd->iconsInfo,i);

COMCTL32_332 is defined with GetProcAddress and points to ordinal 332 of Comctl32.dll - according to my checking with Dependency Viewer, that's DPA_GetPtr, which gets data from a dynamic pointer array. I'm not familiar with what's going on behind the scenes there, but it doesn't seem entirely out of the question.

I'm going to play with this a bit myself, but hopefully it's a good place to get you started. :)

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Mathias Rauen's madCollection (for Delphi not c#) can list Tray Icons.

And there is a commandline tool: Windows System Tray Scan Utility

I have also written (not released) my own program in Delphi (not Delphi.NET), not using madCollection, which shows tray icons, process names, tooltips and other info but it's not perfect. There are a few icons it can't display (even though it lists other info), and it can't display any icons under windows 9x. I haven't tested it at all under Vista.

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In Windows 2000, the system tray icons are in a plain toolbar control (window class "ToolbarWindow32") which is a child of the "TrayNotifyWnd" window, so you can send it toolbar messages such as TB_BUTTONCOUNT and TB_GETBUTTON.

You need to be careful though: messages such as TB_GETBUTTON which require a pointer to a buffer in which to store the results need that buffer to be in the SysTray process itself. This requires that you have the right permissions, and that you use VirtualAllocEx to allocate the memory.

I haven't tried it on XP or Vista. I expect things have changed.

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It was perfectly possible to achieve it in Windows 2000/Xp. Unfortunately in Windows 7 it seems to be not feasible any more.

Trick was simple: you have to find tray window handle:

        static IntPtr GetSystemTrayHandle()
    {
        IntPtr hWndTray = FindWindow("Shell_TrayWnd", null);
        if (hWndTray != IntPtr.Zero)
        {
            hWndTray = FindWindowEx(hWndTray, IntPtr.Zero, "TrayNotifyWnd", null);
            if (hWndTray != IntPtr.Zero)
            {
                hWndTray = FindWindowEx(hWndTray, IntPtr.Zero, "SysPager", null);
                if (hWndTray != IntPtr.Zero)
                {
                    hWndTray = FindWindowEx(hWndTray, IntPtr.Zero, "ToolbarWindow32", null);
                    return hWndTray;
                }
            }
        }

        return IntPtr.Zero;
    }

Since this window is ToolbarWindow32 then you have to enumerate throughout buttons using WinAPI. The only problem is that all structures used for this should be allocated in target process address space, so you have to use something like this:

    private static unsafe bool GetTBButton(IntPtr hToolbar, int i, ref TBBUTTON tbButton, ref string text, ref IntPtr ipWindowHandle)
    {
        // One page
        const int BUFFER_SIZE = 0x1000;

        byte[] localBuffer = new byte[BUFFER_SIZE];

        UInt32 processId = 0;
        UInt32 threadId = User32.GetWindowThreadProcessId(hToolbar, out processId);

        IntPtr hProcess = Kernel32.OpenProcess(ProcessRights.ALL_ACCESS, false, processId);
        if (hProcess == IntPtr.Zero) { Debug.Assert(false); return false; }

        IntPtr ipRemoteBuffer = Kernel32.VirtualAllocEx(
            hProcess,
            IntPtr.Zero,
            new UIntPtr(BUFFER_SIZE),
            MemAllocationType.COMMIT,
            MemoryProtection.PAGE_READWRITE);

        if (ipRemoteBuffer == IntPtr.Zero) { Debug.Assert(false); return false; }

        // TBButton
        fixed (TBBUTTON* pTBButton = &tbButton)
        {
            IntPtr ipTBButton = new IntPtr(pTBButton);

            int b = (int)User32.SendMessage(hToolbar, TB.GETBUTTON, (IntPtr)i, ipRemoteBuffer);
            if (b == 0) { Debug.Assert(false); return false; }

            // this is fixed
            Int32 dwBytesRead = 0;
            IntPtr ipBytesRead = new IntPtr(&dwBytesRead);

            bool b2 = Kernel32.ReadProcessMemory(
                hProcess,
                ipRemoteBuffer,
                ipTBButton,
                new UIntPtr((uint)sizeof(TBBUTTON)),
                ipBytesRead);

            if (!b2) { Debug.Assert(false); return false; }
        }

        // button text
        fixed (byte* pLocalBuffer = localBuffer)
        {
            IntPtr ipLocalBuffer = new IntPtr(pLocalBuffer);

            int chars = (int)User32.SendMessage(hToolbar, TB.GETBUTTONTEXTW, (IntPtr)tbButton.idCommand, ipRemoteBuffer);
            if (chars == -1) { Debug.Assert(false); return false; }

            // this is fixed
            Int32 dwBytesRead = 0;
            IntPtr ipBytesRead = new IntPtr(&dwBytesRead);

            bool b4 = Kernel32.ReadProcessMemory(
                hProcess,
                ipRemoteBuffer,
                ipLocalBuffer,
                new UIntPtr(BUFFER_SIZE),
                ipBytesRead);

            if (!b4) { Debug.Assert(false); return false; }

            text = Marshal.PtrToStringUni(ipLocalBuffer, chars);

            if (text == " ") text = String.Empty;
        }

Unfortunately in Windows 7 tbButton.dwData is equal 0, so you can't find any association between NotifyIcon and a target process

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