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Why do i need to create an instance of Random class, if i want to create a random number between 1 and 100 ....like

Random rand = new Random();
rand.Next(1,100);

Is there any static function of Random class to do the same? like...

Random.Next(1,100);

I don't want to create an instance unnecessarily

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13  
And in conclusion ... don't prematurely optimize :-) –  user166390 Apr 15 '10 at 7:45

12 Answers 12

up vote 17 down vote accepted

It is best practice to create a single instance of Random and use it throughout your program - otherwise the results may not be as random. This behavior is encouraged by not creating a static function.

You shouldn't worry about "creating an instance unnecessarily", the impact is negligible at best - this is the way the framework works.

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could that not be achieved if Random was static? The generator would be seeded at construction time and you could use it through-out? –  Asher Apr 15 '10 at 7:45
1  
@Asher - that would require an internal instance anyway, and require state. I don't think it belongs as part of the framework, but it could be implement easily on your static class. –  Kobi Apr 15 '10 at 7:52
    
@Kobi maybe I should post my own question on this :). The memory usage and performance aside, I do find it annoying to instantiate this class. If you are just going to use one throughout, why not just make it static. Is this something about static classes I am not getting. Anyway, I digress –  Asher Apr 15 '10 at 7:57
1  
Think about reusability - you think you call it just once, but one day maybe someone will call your function 1000 times, and you lose randomness. If you find instantiate class annoying, maybe C# isn't quite right for you :) –  Kobi Apr 15 '10 at 8:00
3  
@Asher : But Random isn't thread safe, so if you wanted calls to Random from multiple threads that wouldn't work... Besides what if you want multiple seeds for your Random classes? For example I want to use multiple threads that will yield the same results upon each execution, requires me to use multiple instances with the same seed, with a static it would be a race. –  Ian Apr 15 '10 at 8:08
//Function to get random number
private static readonly Random random = new Random();
private static readonly object syncLock = new object();
public static int RandomNumber(int min, int max)
{
    lock(syncLock) { // synchronize
        return random.Next(min, max);
    }
}

Copied directly from

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2  
This is pretty good at avoiding miss-use of the class as in Evgeny's answer. +1 for citing the code too, credit where it's due :) –  Codesleuth Apr 15 '10 at 8:02
4  
Sorry, but I don't think this is a good solution. The extra performance cost of a lock makes it a net loss. If you need to do this really fast then the lock matters and it's unnecessary - you should simply create a local Random object and use that. If you don't need to do it really fast then you can just call new Random().Next() every time. Either way, this is not an optimal solution. -1. I don't care if the original answer has 53 votes. -1 to that, too. –  EMP Apr 15 '10 at 23:03

It's not "unnecessary", because the Random class stores some state internally. It does that to make sure that if you call .Next() multiple times very quickly (in the same millisecond or tick or whatever) you still won't get the same number.

Of course, if that's not a problem in your case you can always combine those two lines of code into one:

new Random().Next(1, 100);
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1  
it most probably is a problem to use Random like this...if it is not, it may become a problem soon - if someone implements random number generator like this because it gets called every 50 milliseconds and it works without a problem, it will break very soon as soon as the hardware gets faster and someone will spend A LOT of time debugging this :) –  Marek Apr 15 '10 at 7:43
    
True, so I'd never use this sort of code in a loop - but if you know your program only needs to generate one random number then it's safe enough. –  EMP Apr 15 '10 at 23:15
1  
Yes yes yes, use this to get a single item. Never otherwise. Tempted to downvote. –  nawfal Mar 31 '13 at 12:07

Why not?

You need to create an instance because the way random numbers are generated is that previous answers affect subsequent answers. By default, the new Random() constructor uses the current system time to "seed" the sequence, but it doesn't have to: you can pass your own number in if you like. In particular:

var rand = new Random(1234);
Console.WriteLine(rand.Next(0, 100));
Console.WriteLine(rand.Next(0, 100));
Console.WriteLine(rand.Next(0, 100));
Console.WriteLine(rand.Next(0, 100));

Will produce the same sequence of "random" number every time.

That means the Random class needs to keep instance data (the previous answer, or "seed") around for subsequent calls.

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+1 I was confused about it too. This combined with Ian's comment clears it up for me –  Asher Apr 15 '10 at 8:56

Creating a new instance of Random then calling it immediately multiple times, e.g.:

for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
{
     Random rand = new Random();
     Console.WriteLine(rand.Next(1,100);
}    

Will give you a distribution that is weighted towards the lower end of the range.

Doing it this way:

Random rand = new Random();
for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
{
     Console.WriteLine(rand.Next(1,100);
}    

Will give you a better distribution.

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Just what I was looking for! –  sassyboy Apr 25 '12 at 14:24

From MSDN: Random Class (System):

"The random number generation starts from a seed value. If the same seed is used repeatedly, the same series of numbers is generated. One way to produce different sequences is to make the seed value time-dependent, thereby producing a different series with each new instance of Random. By default, the parameterless constructor of the Random class uses the system clock to generate its seed value, while its parameterized constructor can take an Int32 value based on the number of ticks in the current time. However, because the clock has finite resolution, using the parameterless constructor to create different Random objects in close succession creates random number generators that produce identical sequences of random numbers. The following example illustrates that two Random objects that are instantiated in close succession generate an identical series of random numbers..."

Wikipedia explains PRNGs

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Creating a short-lived instance in C# is almost free. Don't waste your time worrying about this. You probably have better places to look for perf or memory gains.

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adds to annoyance factor –  Asher Apr 15 '10 at 7:38
var number = new Random().Next(1,100);

Thats in one line if that is what you are after, or you could wrap it in a static call if you wanted, but I'm not entirely sure I see any benefits to it being a static method. Infact that may well detract from its feasible "randomness" as I assume initialization of the class grabs some data to do the randomization from each time.

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don't do this and don't wrap this in a static call. This can cause very unexpected (un)randomness when used e.g. in a tight loop because the Random instances will be initialized with the same seed value when created too quickly. Always share a single instance of Random. –  Marek Apr 15 '10 at 7:39
    
@Marek, cheers for that, wasn't aware –  dnolan Apr 15 '10 at 7:41
1  
from msdn: "To improve performance, create one Random to generate many random numbers over time, instead of repeatedly creating a new Random to generate one random number." –  Asher Apr 15 '10 at 7:42
    
@Asher performance is the least important factor here...the unrandomness you may get when creating multiple random instances can cause you much more trouble –  Marek Apr 15 '10 at 7:45

I've done one at:

http://www.codeproject.com/Tips/254057/Random-Color-Generator

It uses CIELab color distance (one of the best for human eyes) to ensure easily differenciable colors. It has an observableCollection of colors that you want to keep away (like backcolor) plus a distance factor (where 1 is the default).

Hope it helps...

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Random number generators must maintain state in order to be "random." The random number generator creates a sequence that is generated based on a random seed. The problem is that nothing in a computer is actually random. The closest thing the computer has at hand is the system clock; that is the effectively the time at which the process takes place. So by default the current tick count of the system clock is used. If your application is fast enough then many random number calculations may occur under the same system tick. If the random number generator doesn't maintain state at all, it will provide the same random number multiple times (same input gives the same output). This is not usually what you want.

I know its already answered, but I just have to say that I prefer to use the singleton pattern in this case.

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You already got answers here. Just reiterating the right solution:

namespace mySpace
{
    public static class Util
    {
        private static rnd = new Random();
        public static int GetRandom()
        {
            return rnd.Next();
        }
    }
}

So you can call:

var i = Util.GetRandom();

all throughout. If you strictly need a true stateless static method to generate random numbers, you can rely on a Guid.

public static class Util
{
    public static int GetRandom()
    {
        return Guid.NewGuid().GetHashCode();
    }
}

It's going to be a wee bit slower, but can be much more random than Random.Next, at least from my experience.

But not:

new Random(Guid.NewGuid().GetHashCode()).Next();

The unnecessary object creation is going to make it slower especially under a loop.

And never:

new Random().Next();

Not only its slower (inside a loop), it's randomness is... well not really good according to me..

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You need something similar to this if you want the syntax you mention.

namespace MyRandom
{
    public class Random
    {
        private static m_rand = new Random();
        public static Next(int min, int max)
        {
            return m_rand.Next(min, max);
        }
    }
}

This should allow you to do Random.Next(1,100); without having to worry about seeding.

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