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I'm on Mac Snow Leopard and I just installed git.

I just tried

git clone git@thechaw.com:cakebook.git

but that gives me this error.

Initialized empty Git repository in `/Users/username/Documents/cakebook/.git/`
Permission denied (publickey).
fatal: The remote end hung up unexpectedly

What am I missing?
I've also tried doing ssh-keygen with no passphase but still same error.

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4  
have you tried to upload the public key that you have generated via ssh-keygen? –  Patrick Cornelissen Apr 15 '10 at 7:52

12 Answers 12

up vote 95 down vote accepted

you will find all your questions answered here: http://thechaw.com/wiki/guides/setup

EDIT

This info is for working on theChaw but can be applied to all other git repositories which support ssh pubkey authentications. (see gitolite, gitlab or github for example)

first start by setting up your own public/private key pair set. This can use either dsa or rsa, so basically any key you setup will work. On most systems you can use ssh-keygen.

  • But first you want to make sure you cd into your .ssh directory. Open up the terminal and run:

    cd ~/.ssh && ssh-keygen

  • next you need to copy this to your clipboard.
    • On OSX run: cat id_rsa.pub | pbcopy
    • On Linux run: cat id_rsa.pub | xclip
  • Add your key to your account via the website.
  • finally setup your git config
    • git config --global user.name "bob"
    • git config --global user.email bob@... (don't forget to restart your command line to make sure the config is reloaded)
Thats it you should be good to clone and checkout.

Further information can be found on https://help.github.com/articles/generating-ssh-keys (thx to @Lee Whitney)

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2  
Ok. This is actually not a git but an ssh synchronization problem. I got the same with Assembla and you link helped me resolving it. Thanks ! –  Euloiix Jan 11 '12 at 1:18
    
This answer is helpful but this seems more complete and just as easy if you are generating keys from scratch: help.github.com/articles/generating-ssh-keys –  Lee Whitney Sep 12 at 15:55

More extensive troubleshooting can be done with

ssh -vT git@github.com

Source: http://help.github.com/ssh-issues/

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This did a ton of things, and then at the end I noticed 'authenticated successfully', tried git pull and it was fine again. –  Replete Jul 15 '12 at 20:50

This error can happen when you are accessing the SSH URL (Read/Write) instead of Git Read-Only URL but you have no write access to that repo.

Sometimes you just want to clone your own repo, e.g. deploy to a server. In this case you actually only need READ-ONLY access. But since that's your own repo, GitHub may display SSH URL if that's your preference. In this situation, if your remote host's public key is not in your GitHub SSH Keys, your access will be denied, which is expected to happen.

An equivalent case is when you try cloning someone else's repo to which you have no write access with SSH URL.

In a word, if your intent is to clone-only a repo, use HTTPS URL (https://github.com/{user_name}/{project_name}.git) instead of SSH URL (git@github.com:{user_name}/{project_name}.git), which avoids (unnecessary) public key validation.


Update: GitHub is displaying HTTPS as the default protocol now and this move can probably reduce possible misuse of SSH URLs.

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Thumbs up for the right answer! Thank you. –  Harold Naparst Jul 31 at 11:38

Note that (at least for some projects) you must have a github account with an ssh key.

Look at the keys listed in your authentication agent (ssh-add -l)
(if you don't see any, add one of your existing keys with ssh-add /path/to/your/key (eg: *ssh-add ~/.ssh/id_rsa*))
(if you don't have any keys, first create one. See: http://rcsg-gsir.imsb-dsgi.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/documents/internet/node31.html or just google ssh-keygen)

To verify that you have a key associated with your github account:

Go to: https://github.com/settings/ssh

You should see at least one key with a hash key matching one of the hashes you saw when you typed ssh-add -l just a minute ago.

If you don't, add one, then try again.

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The basic GIT instructions did not make a reference to the SSH key stuff. Following some of the links above, I found a git help page that explains, step-by-step, exactly how to do this for various operating systems (the link will detect your OS and redirect, accordingly):

http://help.github.com/set-up-git-redirect/

It walks through everything needed for GITHub and also gives detailed explanations such as "why add a passphrase when creating an RSA key." I figured I'd post it, in case it helps someone else...

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On Windows, make sure all your apps agree on HOME. Msys will surprisingly NOT do it for you. I had to set an environment variable because ssh and git couldn't seem to agree on where my .ssh directory was.

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I had a slight different situation, I was logged on to a remote server and was using git on the server, when I ran any git command I got the same message

   Permission denied (publickey).
   fatal: The remote end hung up unexpectedly

The way I fixed it was by changing the file /etc/ssh_config on my Mac. from

ForwardAgent no 

to

ForwardAgent yes
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Did you have to restart ssh for this to work? –  ing0 Jun 27 at 15:29

I was getting a similar Permission denied (publickey) error when trying to run a makefile.

As an alternative to the SSH steps above, you can Install the native GitHub for Mac application.

Click Download GitHub for Mac from - https://help.github.com/articles/set-up-git#platform-mac

Once you complete setup with your git hub account (I also installed the git hub command line tools but unsure if this step is required or not) then I received an email -

[GitHub] A new public key was added to your account

and my error was fixed.

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One of the easiest way

go to terminal-

  git push <Git Remote path> --all
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Are you in a corporate environment? Is it possible that your system variables have recently changed? Per this SO answer, ssh keys live at %HOMEDRIVE%%HOMEPATH%\.ssh\id_rsa.pub. So if %HOMEDRIVE% recently changed, git doesn't know where to look for your key, and thus all of the authentication stuff.

Try running ssh -vT git@github.com. Take note of where the identity file is located. For me, that was pointing not to my normal \Users\MyLogin but rather to a network drive, because of a change to environment variables pushed at the network level.

The solution? Since my new %HOMEDRIVE% has the same permissions as my local files, I just moved my .ssh folder there, and called it a day.

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In addition to Rufinus' reply, the shortcut to copy your ssh key to the clipboard in Windows is:

  • type id_rsa.pub | clip

Refs:

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Use the ssh link from Github but make sure to not append it with ssh just use what the ssh tab on git hub gives you to clone your repo.

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