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I have a code:

    protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData)
    {
        switch (keyData)
        {
            case Keys.Alt|Keys.D1:

                if (this._condition1)
                {
                    return true;
                }
                else
                {
                    return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);
                }

                break;

            case Keys.Control |Keys.U:

                if (this._condition2)
                {
                    return true;
                }
                else
                {
                    return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);
                }

                break;

            default:

                return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);
        }

        return true;

It gives me "unreachable code detected" warning on breaks.

Is it good practice not to use break operator here ? I don't want to turn off "unreachable code detected" warning.

PS: There are many case in my ProcessCmdKey method.

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15 Answers 15

up vote 11 down vote accepted

There are three unreachable statements in your code, first two are the break statements and the last one int he last line "return true" is also unreachable, I dont know whether C# compiler detects that or not, but logically there is no way last return statement will also be reached.

There are multiple ways to solve this issue,

  1. Store a temp variable, called bool retVal, keep retVal and break your switch case and at the end of function return retVal.
  2. If you return value before break, break statement is useless.

Better Design Way

If you return values within switch cases, it may be difficult to analyze your code later on by you or someone else, usually it is better to keep a return value temp variable and return it at end of function, that becomes easier to debug and understand the code for new coder.

Switch can be complicated, and more returns within switch may not have better control, if you want to implement logging, debugging, returns from cases could be complicated. And it becomes way to difficult browsing the logic flow graphs.

So it is better to avoid return altogather from case, but still it depends on situtations as well, one needs to make an intelligent decision here.

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I marked your answer as useful. –  Александр Д. Apr 15 '10 at 8:45
3  
If your switch cases are so long that they become difficult to analyze when using return statements, then your switch cases are too long. It's arguable that using a temp value and returning at the end is at least as confusing as multiple returns, and probably more so. –  Kyralessa Apr 15 '10 at 19:05
1  
I disagree. Storing the result in a local just makes your code appear more complex than it really is; mid-function returns are a great way to clean up code. –  Carl Manaster Apr 15 '10 at 22:51
    
@Carl, @Kyralessa, Please read the last line, "But still it depends on situtations as well, one needs to make an intelligent decision here", this already includes exceptional cases you both have mentioned, however in my experience, I have found mid-function returns very bad to analyze code in later dates. But this is not a standard rule. –  Akash Kava Apr 16 '10 at 10:28
    
@Akash, I'm not referring to exceptional circumstances. If your method is so long that a mid-function return causes confusion, you should shorten the method through any number of well-documented refactorings. The retval construct is to my mind an unequivocal code smell. –  Carl Manaster Apr 16 '10 at 14:18

break is not necessary if all paths in a case statement end with a return. Do not use it then, otherwise you will get the mentioned warning.

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Yes, but is it good practice ? or is it standard practice in such cases ? –  Александр Д. Apr 15 '10 at 8:42
4  
@alex: Well, the compiler is telling you that it is good practice, by giving you a warning when you don't follow it. –  Gorpik Apr 15 '10 at 8:47

In this case, good practice imho would be to end each case with a return, like this:

case Keys.Alt|Keys.D1:
    bool result;
    if (this._condition1) 
        { 
            result = true; 
        } 
        else 
        { 
            result = base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData); 
        }
    return result;

Or

case Keys.Alt|Keys.D1:
    bool result = (this._condition1)
        ? true
        : base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData); 
    return result;
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, It's a good solution. –  Александр Д. Apr 15 '10 at 10:38
    
Well, thank you :D –  Hinek Apr 20 '10 at 7:38

There's nothing wrong with removing the break statement here.

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You use return in both conditions. So break could be easily removed.

But I prefer to leave it there in case you will change your code sometime.

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As well as removing the break; lines from there, you could also remove the else statements too. It's unneeded since you are returning from the first if.

So your code might look like this instead:

protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData)
{
    switch (keyData)
    {
        case Keys.Alt|Keys.D1:
            if (this._condition1)
                return true;                

            return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);

        case Keys.Control |Keys.U:
            if (this._condition2)
                return true;

            return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);

        default:
            return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);
    }

    return true;
}

You can slim it down even more by removing your return true; lines and inverting your if statements, because you return true and the end of the method anyway:

protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData)
{
    switch (keyData)
    {
        case Keys.Alt|Keys.D1:
            if (!this._condition1)
                return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);

            break;

        case Keys.Control |Keys.U:
            if (!this._condition2)
                return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);

            break;

        default:
            return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);
    }

    return true;
}

EDIT: I forgot that you can't fall through using C# so you'd need a break; in each case. Which kind of ruins the nice readability of that block.

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never mind what I said, apparently C# compiler refuses to fall-through, –  Pim Jager Apr 15 '10 at 8:32
2  
Actually there is no fall through with it being C#,. however, the second case does require break s at the end of each case, or else the compiler will say no –  Sekhat Apr 15 '10 at 8:38
    
You're right, I completely forgot about the no fall through rule in C#. I'll edit the answer. –  CnTwo Apr 15 '10 at 8:45

Break statement will never be executed, cause you return from the method. So I suggest to remove the unnecessary break.

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Bitter experience has taught me to always include break statements unless you really mean to fallthrough to the next statement and even then, comment it. Otherwise a function could behave wildly differently because another developer changed something late on a Friday afternoon and didn't see the missing break.

If the function - however large - conforms to the same if...return...else....return structure throughout, you could define a return code variable at the start of the function. Then assign it in your case statement and return it at the end, whatever value it turns out to be.

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1  
In C#, falling through case statements is prohibited; the compiler will kick up a fuss if a logical path can fall through to the next case. –  Tragedian Apr 15 '10 at 8:28
    
This is not a problem with C#, since the compiler will fail on all automatic fallthroughs. –  Arjan Einbu Apr 15 '10 at 8:30
    
Ah gotcha. My comment is redundant for C# then. –  tridian Apr 15 '10 at 8:34

There is a certain misunderstanding that all case blocks in a C# switch must end with a break. In fact they must end with a jump statement in all code paths; this can be break, return, goto or even continue (or throw, of course). Since the compiler will raise an error if there is a code path with no jump statement, there is absolutely no reason for the final break in the example. The compiler will not let you change your code to a version where the final break would be reached, and this would be the moment to add it.

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1  
Or "while true() { }" ! –  Eric Lippert Apr 15 '10 at 14:24

You could rewrite your code to be a lot shorter and less repatative:

bool ret = false;
switch(keyDate){
    case Keys.Alt | Keys.D1:
         ret = this._condition1;
    break;
    case Keys.Control |Keys.U:
         ret = this._condition2;
    break;
    default: break;
 }
 return ret || base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);
share|improve this answer
    
I don't see what bugs would be avoided by leaving in an unreachable break statement. If it were C or C++, then sure, but C# does not allow falling through from one case to the next. If you need to break later, the compiler will complain about it then. And in the current code that you're actually working with it's completely useless. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 15 '10 at 22:23
    
Yeah, I didn't realize the C# compiler does not allow fall through. –  Pim Jager Apr 15 '10 at 22:45

A switch statement is not necessary here at all, avoiding the problem altogether:

protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData) 
{ 
    return
        (keyData == Keys.Alt|Keys.D1 && this._condition1) ||
        (keyData == Keys.Control|Keys.U && this._condition2) ||
        base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
As I mentioned, there are many cases in ProcessCmdKEy method ... –  Александр Д. Apr 15 '10 at 8:45
    
There is no limit to how many conditions you can string together, but I guess you do not want to change the existing code too much? –  ShellShock Apr 15 '10 at 8:49
    
I mean that many "if" would be less understandable and unreadable. Solution with "case" will be more readalbe. –  Александр Д. Apr 15 '10 at 10:40
    
Readability is in the eye of the beholder. I find the switch statement harder to read because it is more spread out with different parts to it. –  ShellShock Apr 15 '10 at 11:06

As the code is currently, the "break" commands will never be run nor will the final "return true" command. Removing these would get rid of the warnings.

You might want to try for a solution with fewer return paths as it can make code harder to debug and understand. Something like this:

    protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData)
    {
        bool processed = false;
        switch (keyData)
        {
            case Keys.Alt | Keys.D1:

                if (this._condition1)
                    processed = true;

                break;

            case Keys.Control | Keys.U:

                if (this._condition2)
                    processed = true;

                break;
        }

        if (!processed)
            processed = base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);

        return processed;
    }
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I understand that this doesn't answer the question directly, but inspired by the various answers here I just wanted to add another variation on how the "switch" could be structured:

protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData)
{
    if (keyData == Keys.Alt|Keys.D1 && _condition1)
        return true;

    if (keyData == Keys.Control|Keys.U && _condition2)
        return true;

    // ...repeat for other variations

    return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);
}
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According to your code, all the break(s) and the last statement are never reached, for there are the return statements before.

You could rewrite your code like this:

    switch (keyData)
    {
        case Keys.Alt|Keys.D1:
            if (this._condition1) return true;
            else goto default;

        case Keys.Control |Keys.U:
            if (this._condition2) return true;
            else goto default;

        default:
            return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
That hurts my eyes. –  Paddy Apr 15 '10 at 8:30
1  
Unnecessary use of goto: Do not want! –  Tragedian Apr 15 '10 at 8:31
    
+1 I would remove the 'else' too, leaving just goto default:. –  kenny Apr 15 '10 at 8:32
2  
replace "else goto default;" with "break;" and put the return outside of the default. Same effect, less difficult to understand. –  Pim Jager Apr 15 '10 at 8:34
    
I do apologize for making your eyes hurt :) goto statement is actually useless. Sorry! –  mamoo Apr 15 '10 at 9:21

Good practice would be to not use a switch statement.
Some thing like this would be a better design... This is a really bad design:

protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData)
{
    bool result = (keyData == (Keys.Alt | Keys.D1)) ? this._condition1 : false;
    result = (keyData == (Keys.Control | Keys.U)) ? this._condition2 : result;
    return result ? true : base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);
}

Edit: It might be a bit harder to read...


Edit 2: My first snippet was really bad, but I still think avoiding switch statements is to prefer.
This is my opinion, some people agrees with me and some don´t.
Sure switch statements can make a difference when used right, but I think that´s the problem, you have to use them right.
When I can I rather use a dictionary, if´s or polymorphism.

This is probably what I would have done in the OP´s situation.

protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData)
{
    if (keyData == (Keys.Alt | Keys.D1) && this._condition1) return true;
    if (keyData == (Keys.Control | Keys.U) && this._condition2) return true;
    return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);
}
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2  
I cannot see at all why this would be a better design, if it is harder to read. –  Gorpik Apr 15 '10 at 8:48
    
@Gorpik, I don´t think it´s harder to read, but it might be for others. As for the design part, I think it´s easier to make an error in a switch statement with nested if´s and multiple return points, than in a expression like this. –  Jens Granlund Apr 15 '10 at 10:31
    
Its easy to read. But hard to see what the end result is without debugging it in my mind. Also, I totally do not agree that using a switch is not good practice. So -1 from me. –  Peter Lillevold Apr 15 '10 at 12:34
    
@Peter, it´s all a matter of opinion. I have seen a lot of abused switch statements, so mine is: If you can avoid switch statements you should. –  Jens Granlund Apr 15 '10 at 12:58
1  
@Jens, I agree to some extent that it boils down to opinion. But calling out against using switch is imo plain misguidance. switch is great when used right. This goes for the conditional operator too. –  Peter Lillevold Apr 15 '10 at 18:29

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