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You have been given an array of size 2n+1 that have n pair of integers (can be +ve, -ve or 0) and one unpaired element.

How would you find the unpaired element?

Pair means duplicate. So (3,3) is a pair and (3,-3) is not a pair.

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4  
What is a "pair" - can you give an example? I.e. is { 3, -3 } a pair, or is { 3, 3 } a pair? – GalacticCowboy Apr 15 '10 at 11:26
4  
A pair is always two of the same kind. 3 and -3 is not a pair. – Lasse V. Karlsen Apr 15 '10 at 11:48
3  
A pair is whatever a problem defines it to be. In this case, I think the question considers (x, -x) a pair and it asks to find the number that has no pair. Clarifications would be nice however. – IVlad Apr 15 '10 at 12:38
1  
possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1851716/… – starblue Apr 16 '10 at 18:20
2  
This is a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/35185/… – Kyle Cronin Apr 16 '10 at 21:37

Take XOR of all the elements.

The pairs will cancel out as

a XOR a = 0

and the result will be the only unpaired element as

0 XOR a = a

If its okay to destroy the array you can XOR adjacent elements. Once done the last element of the array has the unpaired element:

N = Num of elements in array.
for( i=1 to N )
   arr[i] ^= arr[i-1];    
print arr[N-1]

If its not okay to destroy the array, you can make use of a variable to hold the result:

N = Num of elements in array.
Unpaired = arr[0];
for( i=1 to N )
   Unpaired = Unpaired ^ arr[i];    
print Unpaired

C function to do the same:

int findUnpaired(int *arr,int len) {
 int i;                  // loop counter.
 int unpaired;           // to hold the unpaired element.

 unpaired = arr[0];      // initialize it with the 1st array ele.

 for(i=1;i<len;i++) {    // loop for all remaining elements.
    unpaired ^= arr[i];  // XOR each element with the running XOR.
 }
 return unpaired;        // return result.
}
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1  
the elements are not sorted, so copy elements will not be next to each other. My thinking it will work only when sorted. Correct? – karank Apr 15 '10 at 10:00
3  
Not Correct. The elements need not be sorted. Take for example: 1 2 3 1 3. Trace the algorithm on this example. When you XOR all, you'll get 2. – codaddict Apr 15 '10 at 10:03
14  
In formal terms, xor is commutative and associative, meaning that the order in which initial inputs are xored has no bearing on the final result. – Michał Marczyk Apr 15 '10 at 12:51
1  
The method "returns" (i.e. prints) array[N-1], in your case 6 wich is the solution. – phimuemue Apr 15 '10 at 14:57
1  
Thanks phimuemue. I had to read unicornaddicts code a few time before I realised what it was doing. I've removed my comment. – Matt Ellen Apr 15 '10 at 15:31

Single line Linq example with a XOR solution :

Demo on DotNetFiddle

public static void Main()
{
    int[] tab = { 1, 2, 3, 2, 1 };
    Console.WriteLine(GetSingle(tab));
}

private static int GetSingle(IEnumerable<int> tab)
{
    return tab.Aggregate(0, (current, i) => current ^ i);
}

For fun and profit

Edit:

Explication for this snippet.

var a = 2;
var b = 2;
Console.WriteLine(a ^ b); // will print 0
// because x ^ x == 0

var c = 3;
Console.WriteLine(a ^ b ^ c); // will print 3
// because 0 ^ x == x

Console.WriteLine(0 ^ a); // guess the output
// get it? :)
// Now, lets aggregate this enumerable ;)
share|improve this answer
    
I think there is some bug here. Please check array : { 2, 1, 2, 2, 1,1,5 } - code on the Demo on DotNetFiddle returns 6, while expected value should be 5 – lm. Jul 30 '15 at 9:58
    
No bug here. Your input is wrong. You have threefold instead of pair here :) – aloisdg Aug 24 '15 at 11:15
    
@aloisdg Do you mind explaining the theory behind the solution? I have tired it and it works but i want to understand how you knew XORing all the elements would result in the unpaired int. Thanks – Anwuna Jan 24 at 18:35
    
@Anwuna I added a tiny snippet. The logic behind this should be appear by itself. – aloisdg Jan 30 at 8:54

Alternate solution, to find all unique values in O(n) and O(n) space:

Initialize a Hash table.
For each value in the array, check if the value exists in the Hash table, if it does, remove it, if it doesn't, add it.
Return value is all the items inside the Hash table.

Can easily be modified to use a dictionary if the recurring values can recur more than once.

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Here'a a simple LINQ solution that can easily be extended to provide the number of occurrences of each unique element:

     int[] numbers = { -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 };

     var numberGroups =
         from n in numbers
         group n by n into g
         select new { Number = g.Key, IsPaired = g.Count() == 2 };

     Console.WriteLine("Unpaired elements:");
     foreach (var group in numberGroups)
     {
        if (!group.IsPaired)
           Console.WriteLine(group.Number);
     }

Output:

Unpaired elements:
-1
0
5
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I just share another Linq answer. You might like it. – aloisdg Mar 30 '15 at 17:35

The best answer is the XOR operator. Just for fun another way is, if you are allowed to sort the array, to sort it and compare adjacent integers. This assumes all integers appear exactly twice with one integer appearing once.

// Random array of integers
int[] arr = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9};

// Sort the array.
Arrays.sort(arr);

// Array now looks like: 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 6 7 7 8 9 9 
// Cycle through array comparing adjacent values.
for(int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++){

    // This would mean the single number was the last element in the array.
    if(i == arr.length-1)
        singleNum = arr[i];

    // If the adjacent elements are the same, skip foward. 
    if(i < arr.length-1 && arr[i] == arr[i+1])
        i ++;
    else
        // Otherwise, you found the single number.
        singleNum = arr[i];
}
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