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I've created a JAX-RS service (MyService) that has a number of sub resources, each of which is a subclass of MySubResource. The sub resource class being chosen is picked based on the parameters given in the MyService path, for example:

@Path("/") @Provides({"text/html", "text/xml"}) 
public class MyResource {
  @Path("people/{id}") public MySubResource getPeople(@PathParam("id") String id) {
    return new MyPeopleSubResource(id);
  }
  @Path("places/{id}") public MySubResource getPlaces(@PathParam("id") String id) {
    return new MyPlacesSubResource(id);
  }
}

where MyPlacesSubResource and MyPeopleSubResource are both sub-classes of MySubResource.

MySubResource is defined as:

public abstract class MySubResource {
  protected abstract Results getResults();

  @GET public Results get() { return getResults(); }

  @GET @Path("xml") 
  public Response getXml() {
    return Response.ok(getResults(), MediaType.TEXT_XML_TYPE).build();  
  }

  @GET @Path("html") 
  public Response getHtml() {
    return Response.ok(getResults(), MediaType.TEXT_HTML_TYPE).build();  
  }
}

Results is processed by corresponding MessageBodyWriters depending on the mimetype of the response.

While this works it results in paths like /people/Bob/html or /people/Bob/xml where what I really want is /people/Bob.html or /people/Bob.xml

Does anybody know how to accomplish what I want to do?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Old topic, but this is something I solved recently using Jersey; perhaps it'll help someone else.

Jersey supports specifying the accepted content type as a file extension in the URI through the use of request filters. Jersey supplies a UriConnegFilter (URI Content Negotiation Filter) object that you extend to translate specific extensions to content types. You then include that filter as an initial parameter to the Jersey application.

Since that all sounds so vague, here's a concrete example from my project:

I wanted to be able to interpret ".json" and ".xml" at the end of the URL as meaning that the client wanted JSON-formatted or XML-formatted content, respectively. To that end, I extended UriConnegFilter like so:

package my.filter.package;

import com.sun.jersey.api.container.filter.UriConnegFilter;

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

import javax.ws.rs.core.MediaType;


public class MediaTypeFilter extends UriConnegFilter {
  private static final Map<String, MediaType> mappedMediaTypes = new HashMap<String, MediaType>(2);

  static {
    mappedMediaTypes.put("json", MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON_TYPE);
    mappedMediaTypes.put("xml", MediaType.APPLICATION_XML_TYPE);
  }

  public MediaTypeFilter() {
    super(mappedMediaTypes);
  }
}

Then, since I am using Jersey as a Servlet, I added MediaTypeFilter to my web.xml:

<servlet>
  <servlet-name>My Jersey Servlet</servlet-name>
  <servlet-class>com.sun.jersey.spi.container.servlet.ServletContainer</servlet-class>
  <init-param>
    <param-name>com.sun.jersey.config.property.packages</param-name>
    <param-value>my.resource.package</param-value>
  </init-param>
  <init-param>
    <param-name>com.sun.jersey.spi.container.ContainerRequestFilters</param-name>
    <param-value>com.sun.jersey.api.container.filter.LoggingFilter;
                 my.filter.package.MediaTypeFilter;
                 com.sun.jersey.api.container.filter.PostReplaceFilter;
                 com.sun.jersey.api.container.filter.GZIPContentEncodingFilter</param-value>
  </init-param>
  <init-param>
    <param-name>com.sun.jersey.spi.container.ContainerResponseFilters</param-name>
    <param-value>com.sun.jersey.api.container.filter.GZIPContentEncodingFilter;
                 com.sun.jersey.api.container.filter.LoggingFilter</param-value>
  </init-param>
  <load-on-startup>1</load-on-startup>
</servlet>

With that in place, Jersey translates the extension on the URI into the specified media type, and removes the extension. This works for root resources and sub-resources because it operates on the whole URI. For your particular example, /people/Bob.xml would become /people/Bob and the Accept header in the request would be changed to "application/xml" (overriding any existing Accept header).

hth,

-Peter

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Thanks, this is pretty much exactly what I wanted. I'll just have to remember it for the next time I come to need this functionality (assuming we don't move off jersey :/) –  Matt Feb 3 '12 at 15:20

You could possibly write some servlet routing to work it out. Realistically though, you should be using Content Types to do this.

@GET @Path("/") @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML)
public Response getXml() { ... }

@GET @Path("/") @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_HTML)
public Response getHtml() { ... }

The JAX-RS provider will then work out what to call based on the client's request. Even better, you could us JAXB and RestEASY to do it all for you!

@GET
@Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML)
@Path("/{id}")
public MyObject getXml(@PathParam("typeDocument") String id) {
 myObjectService.get(id);
}


@XmlRootElement(name="myObject")
public class MyObject {
// Some properties
}

See http://java.dzone.com/articles/resteasy-spring for a good example with Spring.

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1  
Thanks for the response, this is actually the way I originally implemented it. Unfortunately some browsers don't send a compatible Accept header and so get shown the xml instead of html representation. Using servlet routing may work though haven't written one of those before. Come to think of it using routing would probably break the UriBuilder.getPath methods which I use exclusively in the html views. Guess I'd better keep looking... –  Matt Jun 17 '10 at 13:16

This is an old topic and I'm sure you figured this out, but for those getting to this page, Resteasy has an easy way to achieve what you needed. It's called URL-based content negotiation.

See details here: http://docs.jboss.org/resteasy/docs/2.0.0.GA/userguide/html_single/index.html#media_mappings

Basically, you need to add a context parameter in your web.xml file that will tell Resteasy to map the suffix of your URL to a specific content-type:

<context-param>
    <param-name>resteasy.media.type.mappings</param-name>
    <param-value>html : text/html, json : application/json, xml : application/xml</param-value>
</context-param>

With this, accessing /people/Bob.xml is the same as acessing /people/Bob and specifying an Accept-Encoding: application/xml.

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One way to solve this is you can probably use a regular expression capture in your @javax.ws.rs.Path.

@Path("people/{id:[^/]+?}{format:(\\.[^/]*?)?}")
@GET
public MySubResource getPeople(@PathParam("id") String id, @PathParam("format") String format) {
    // remove the "." from the start of "format" if it is not null
    return new MySubResource(id, format);
}

Then in your sub-resource:

public abstract class MySubResource {
    final protected String format;

    protected MySubResource(String id, String format) {
        this.format = format;
    }

    protected abstract Results getResults();

    @GET
    public Response get() {
       return Response.ok(getResults(), this.format).build();  
    }
}

Be careful with the regular expressions. I gave an example but you may want to tighten the expression to make sure that nothing slips through.

Another way to solve this is to change where your {id} is being captured and use the regular expression there. Instead of having @Path("id") MySubResource public getPeople(@PathParam("id") String id) capture the id, remove the id capture from getPeople() and change MySubResource like so:

 @Path("people")
 public MySubResource getPeople() {
    return new MyPeopleSubResource();
 }

public abstract class MySubResource {
  protected abstract Results getResults();

  @GET
  @Path("{id}")
  public Results get() { return getResults(); }

  @GET
  @Path("{id}.xml") 
  public Response getXml() {
    return Response.ok(getResults(), MediaType.TEXT_XML_TYPE).build();  
  }

  @GET
  @Path("{id}.html") 
  public Response getHtml() {
    return Response.ok(getResults(), MediaType.TEXT_HTML_TYPE).build();  
  }
}

There are tradeoffs in either case depending on how your data structures are organized and when you need to know the "id" parameter. I'm not particular fond of regular expressions since they're really hard to get right but it's a possibility in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I was hoping to avoid doing it like this because moving the logic for choosing response types into the parent resource has two drawbacks: 1) it means that I need to copy the functionality to everywhere a sub resource is returned and 2) if one of my sub resource can return an extra type (say application/json) then this needs to be pushed into the parent resource; both of these I think are leaky abstractions. Unfortunately, so far, this seems to be the only solution and I'll just have to lump the disadvantages. –  Matt Jul 20 '10 at 8:17

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