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Is it possible to reference an outer query in a subquery with MySQL? I know there are some cases where this is possible:

SELECT *
FROM table t1
WHERE t1.date = (
    SELECT MAX(date)
    FROM table t2
    WHERE t2.id = t1.id
);

But I'm wondering if something like this could work:

SELECT u.username, c._postCount
FROM User u
INNER JOIN (
    SELECT p.user, COUNT(*) AS _postCount
    FROM Posting p
    --# This is the reference I would need:
    WHERE p.user = u.id
    GROUP BY p.user
) c ON c.user = u.id
WHERE u.joinDate < '2009-10-10';

I know I could achieve the same using a GROUP BY or by pulling the outer WHERE clause into the sub-query, but I need this for automatic SQL generation and cannot use either alternative for various other reasons.

UPDATE: Sorry, the question led to some confusion: The first query is just a working example, to demonstrate what I don't need.

UPDATE 2: I need both u.id = p.user comparisons: The first counts users that joined before '2009-10-10', while the other one is a join condition that associates table rows correctly.

share|improve this question
1  
why the update 2? sql will parse the derived table 'c' and get a complete list of all user ids and their post counts. the join ON c.user = u.id will then only return users who satisfy the joinDate constraint on u. –  oedo Apr 15 '10 at 16:19
    
Oh, you are absolutely correct, looks like that's my mistake. I'll mark your commant as the accepted answer :) –  soulmerge Apr 15 '10 at 16:47
    
thanks, glad i could help :) –  oedo Apr 15 '10 at 23:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

i think that won't work, because you're referencing your derived table 'c' as part of a join.

however, you could just take out the WHERE p.user = u.id though and replace with a GROUP BY p.user in the derived table, because the ON c.user = u.id will have the same effect.

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Thx for the answer. But your query would do something else: It would count all users regardless of join date. edit: sorry, looks like I had forgotten the inner group by –  soulmerge Apr 15 '10 at 13:25

Isn't this what you're after?

SELECT u.username, c._postCount
FROM User u
INNER JOIN (
    SELECT p.user, COUNT(*) AS _postCount
    FROM Posting p
    GROUP BY p.user    
) c ON c.user = u.id
WHERE u.joinDate < '2009-10-10';

The reason this will work is that the nature of the join itself will filter on user. You don't need to have a WHERE clause explictly filtering on user.

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Both joins are are mandatory and serve different purposes - updated the question –  soulmerge Apr 15 '10 at 15:19
    
I guess I still don't understand. You don't need the where clause in the middle at all, because the join between c and u filters out all users with no posts, and correctly correlates the records based on userid. I updated the post to reflect what I mean. –  Jeremy Apr 15 '10 at 16:35
    
+1 You are right, that was my mistake (oedo was faster, though) –  soulmerge Apr 15 '10 at 16:49
    
perfect solution to my problem. –  hmd Dec 19 '14 at 10:44

very close...

WHERE t1.date = ( 
    SELECT MAX(date) 

change to

WHERE t1.date IN ( 
    SELECT MAX(date) 

Since your query does a MAX(), it will always return just one date... since your sub-select has the filter on the unique ID, it should give you what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
that's not the problem OP's got, and also using = instead of IN will work fine too. –  oedo Apr 15 '10 at 13:13
    
oedo's right - updated the question to clarify –  soulmerge Apr 15 '10 at 15:19

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