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I have been looking through some code on an open source project recently and found many occurrences of this kind of code:

class SomeClass
{
    private int SomeNumber = 42;

    public ReturnValue UseSomeNumber(...)
    {
        int someNumberCopy = this.SomeNumber;
        if (someNumberCopy > ...)
        {
            // ... do some work with someNumberCopy
        }
        else
        {
            // ... do something else with someNumberCopy
        }
    }
}

Is there any real benefit to making a copy of the instance variable?

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7  
One benefit is lock free thread safety –  adrianm Apr 15 '10 at 13:30
1  
It's not as typical to see this pattern used for copying an integer field, but I see and use this often when referencing fields that could be set to null on another thread. It's only a small part of a thread-safe design, but this is important for preventing hard-to-find race conditions. –  Dan Bryant Apr 15 '10 at 13:41
1  
@Dan: or, for creating hard-to-find race conditions. When you make a copy you just end up with a different race. Now the race is that the copy is made, and then the original value is changed, and now the function does a computation on stale data. –  Eric Lippert Apr 15 '10 at 14:08
    
@Eric, that's a good point... I think in most cases I've used this, it's made sense to use the stale data (such as calling an event), but I could see this being a problem if the copied value had been Disposed on another thread, for example. –  Dan Bryant Apr 15 '10 at 17:29

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

No unless you don't want to change the value of SomeNumber and you intend on updating someNumberCopy. Like if you were going to loop the number of times and were going to decrement someNumberCopy down to zero to keep track of the count.

I suppose copying the variable like that could protect you from some outside function altering SomeNumber and changing it without your knowledge while performing an operation. I could potentially see this if the class was supposed to be used in a multi-threaded application. Maybe not he way I would go about it, but that could have been the author's intent.

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Possibly this is part of multi-threaded program. Though this code is not thread-safe, it ensures that once copy variable is assigned, it is not changed by another threads, and all function code after this runs consistently.

Similar code with events becomes critical in multi-threaded environment:

MyEvent e = this.myEvent;

if ( e != null )
{
    e();
}

Here, without making a local copy, it is possible to get null-pointer exception, if event becomes null after testing for null, and before invoking.

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I didn't even think about the multi-threaded when I was looking at the code, so thank you for your answer. Having looked back at it now, it turns out the actual usage is that the instance variable is already readonly and set by the constructor, and the value is not changed. It now looks to me like this may have been done to change the name of the variable so the code reads easier. –  Nick Larsen Apr 15 '10 at 13:45

Is the // ... do some work with someNumberCopy doing something with someNumberCopy? Is it changing the value? Is it being passed to a method that might change the value?

If not then no, there is no benefit.

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You left out some important details.
If you have multiple threads accessing SomeNumber and this scenario:

    int someNumberCopy = this.SomeNumber;
    if (someNumberCopy > x)
    {
        // do some work with someNumberCopy
        // that relies on (someNumberCopy > x) == true
    }

Then it is important to make a copy.

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It could be useful if this.SomeNumber can be modified by another thread, but for the duration of this method it is vital that the someNumberCopy cannot be changed (it can be out of sync with SomeNumber) then this might be viable, otherwise I don't see a reason for it.

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The only benefit I see is for having a "readonly version" of the variable just for that method

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no. leave this work for optimizer.

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