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What are XAND and XOR? Also is there an XNot

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Other than XOR, but I've not heard of them. There can only be 15 boolean operators, and if you combine not with them all, only 7. –  WhirlWind Apr 15 '10 at 15:12
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Do you mean NAND instead of XAND? –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Apr 15 '10 at 15:12
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I might, don't know. –  Arlen Beiler Apr 15 '10 at 15:21
    
Actually, come to think of it, XAnd is exactly like And –  Arlen Beiler Apr 15 '10 at 15:25
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Not really. XAND would be XNOR where both input equal (high or low) would result in the output being high (or true.) –  Matthew Whited Apr 15 '10 at 15:38

13 Answers 13

up vote 22 down vote accepted

XOR is short for exclusive or. It is a logical, binary operator that requires that one of the two operands be true but not both.

So these statements are true:

TRUE XOR FALSE
FALSE XOR TRUE

And these statements are false:

FALSE XOR FALSE
TRUE XOR TRUE

There really isn't such a thing as an"exclusive and" (or XAND) since in theory it would have the same exact requirements as XOR. There also isn't an XNOT since NOT is a unary operator that negates its single operand (basically it just flips a boolean value to its opposite) and as such it cannot support any notion of exclusivity.

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2  
XAND would be the same as XNOR not XOR. –  Matthew Whited Apr 15 '10 at 15:39
    
It would also confuse the crap out of most people which is why it is typically listed as XNOR. –  Matthew Whited Apr 15 '10 at 15:41
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Exclusive "Not Or" should actually be Not "Exclusive Or" –  Arlen Beiler Apr 15 '10 at 16:00
    
That doesn't stop it from be noted as XNOR. –  Matthew Whited Apr 15 '10 at 16:14
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@Matthew Whited:"XAND would be the same as XNOR not XOR." This is a false statement. XNOR and XOR are themselves different. Just as NOR is the opposite of OR, XNOR is the opposite of XOR. The 'N' in NOR stands for "negative" or "negated". The XAND simply would be always FALSE, so there is no need for XAND. –  ingyhere Oct 28 '12 at 20:01

XOR is Exclusive Or. It means "One of the two items being XOR'd is true, but not both of them."

TRUE XOR TRUE : FALSE
TRUE XOR FALSE : TRUE
FALSE XOR TRUE : TRUE
FALSE XOR FALSE: FALSE

Wikipedia's XOR Article

XAND I have not heard of.

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1  
Let's use the analog for XAND: "BOTH of the two items being XAND'd is true, but not both of them." Contradictory! So there is no case of TRUE. The XAND would simply and always be a FALSE. –  ingyhere Oct 28 '12 at 19:56

Guys, don´t scare the crap out of others (hey! just kidding), but it´s really all a question of equivalences and synonyms:

firstly:

"XAND" doesn´t exist logically, neither does "XNAND", however "XAND" is normally thought-up by a studious but confused initiating logic student.(wow!). It com from the thought that, if there´s a XOR(exclusive OR) it´s logical to exist a "XAND"("exclusive" AND). The rational suggestion would be an "IAND"("inclusive" AND), which isn´t used or recognised as well. So:

 XNOR <=> !XOR <=> EQV

And all this just discribes a unique operator, called the equivalency operator(<=>, EQV) so:

A  |  B  | A <=> B | A XAND B | A XNOR B | A !XOR B | ((NOT(A) AND B)AND(A AND NOT(B)))
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
T  |  T  |    T    |     T    |     T    |     T    |                T    
T  |  F  |    F    |     F    |     F    |     F    |                F    
F  |  T  |    F    |     F    |     F    |     F    |                F    
F  |  F  |    T    |     T    |     T    |     T    |                T    

And just a closing comment: The 'X' prefix is only possible if and only if the base operator isn´t unary. So, XNOR <=> NOT XOR <=/=> X NOR.

Peace.

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In the book written by Charles Petzold titled "Code" he says there are 6 gates. There is the AND logical gate, the OR gate, the NOR gate, the NAND gate, and the XOR gate. He also mentions the 6th gate briefly calling it the "coincidence gate" and implies it's not used very often. He says it has the opposite output of a XOR gate because a XOR gate has the output of "false" when it has two true or two false sides of the equation and the only way for a XOR gate to have its output be true is for one of the sides of the equation to be true and the other to be false, it doesn't matter which. The coincidence is the exact opposite of this because with the coincidence gate if one is true and the other is false (doesn't matter which is which) then it will have its output be "false" in both those cases. And the way for a coincidence gate to have its output be "true" is for both sides to be either false or true. If both are false the coincidence gate will evaluate as true. If both are true then the coincidence gate will also output "true" in that case as well.

So in the cases where the XOR gate outputs "false", the coincidence gate will output "true". And in the cases where the XOR gate will output "true", the coincidence gate will output "false".

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The opposite of xor is a pretty common gate, but there are another couple you didn't mention: A and not B and A or not B. One might also regard B and not A and B or not A as additional gate types, if A and B are not interchangeable. –  supercat Nov 20 '12 at 23:36

Hmm.. well I know about XOR (exclusive or) and NAND and NOR. These are logic gates and have their software analogs.

Essentially they behave like so:

XOR is true only when one of the two arguments is true, but not both.

F XOR F = F
F XOR T = T
T XOR F = T
T XOR T = F

NAND is true as long as both arguments are not true.

F NAND F = T
F NAND T = T
T NAND F = T
T NAND T = F

NOR is true only when neither argument is true.

F NOR F = T
F NOR T = F
T NOR F = F
T NOR T = F
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To add to this, since I was just dealing with it, if you are looking for an "equivalence gate" or a "coincedence gate" as your XAND, what you really have is just "equals".

If you think about it, given XOR from above:

F XOR F = F
F XOR T = T
T XOR F = T
T XOR T = F

And we expect XAND should be:

F XAND F = T
F XAND T = F
T XAND F = F
T XAND T = T

And isn't this exactly the same?

F == F = T
F == T = F
T == F = F
T == T = T
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Yeah, you're right. –  Arlen Beiler Oct 18 '12 at 23:14
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XOR: "One OR the other but not both." So, I would expect, XAND: "One AND the other but not both." Since AND implies two TRUEs to be true, and the eXclusive operator rules them out, all results would be FALSE. Therefore, XAND is simply FALSE. –  ingyhere Oct 28 '12 at 19:51
    
@ingyhere I totally agree with you and most answers don't make sense. Semantics suggests that output is exclusive, which means operands can not be both in the same state. And logical results of OR are not simply negated results of AND, so I expect that XAND is also not negated version of XOR. XAND should return FALSE for all values of input. –  doc Sep 17 '14 at 20:57

There's a simple argument to see where the binary logic gates come from, using truth tables, which have come up already.

There are six that represent commutative operations, in which a op b == b op a. Each binary operator has an associated three column truth table that defines it. The first two columns can be fixed for the defining tables for all the operators.

Consider the third column. It's a sequence of four binary digits. There are sixteen combinations, but the constraint of commutativity effectively removes one row from the truth tables, so it's only eight. Two more get knocked off because all truths or all falses isn't a useful gate. These are the familiar or, and, and xor, plus their negations.

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There is no such thing as Xand or Xnot. There is Nand, which is the opposite of and

TRUE and TRUE   : TRUE
TRUE and FALSE  : FALSE
FALSE and TRUE  : FALSE
FALSE and FALSE : FALSE


TRUE nand TRUE   : FALSE
TRUE nand FALSE  : TRUE
FALSE nand TRUE  : TRUE
FALSE nand FALSE : TRUE
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Actually, even though 'nand' and 'nor' are the opposite of 'and' and 'or' respectively, you would think they were just implemented with a 'not' gate attached to the output of and/or. But 'nand' and 'nor' can actually be implemented with less cmos gates than their more conventional counterparts. One way of optimizing circuits is to replace as many 'and' and 'or' gates as you can with 'nand' and 'nor' gates. –  Cheese Daneish Apr 15 '10 at 15:21
    
In both CMOS and NMOS logic, "and" and "or" gates may be cascaded cheaply to small depths, such that "not ((A or B) and (C or D))" has essentially the same cost as a four-input NAND or NOR gate. There is a common logic operation which perhaps deserves its own term and language operator, but in many cases doesn't have one: "X and not Y". Note that the lack of an operator for this purpose can cause unexpected behavior in expressions like myUint64 &= ~0x80000000 [what's desired is to clear all bits of the variable that are set in the operand, but instead... –  supercat Sep 30 '13 at 17:49
    
...it clears out the entire 32 bits in addition to the desired bit]. BTW, for some contexts there's a nice 3-input logic operation which would be to the ? : operator what & and | are to the && and || operators; essentially, X mux Y vs Z would mean (X & Y) | (~X & Z). –  supercat Sep 30 '13 at 17:49

The XOR definition is well known to be the odd-parity function. For two inputs:

A XOR B = (A AND NOT B) OR (B AND NOT A)

The complement of XOR is XNOR

A XNOR B = (A AND B) OR (NOT A AND NOT B)

Henceforth, the normal two-input XAND defined as

A XAND B = A AND NOT B

The complement is XNAND:

A XNAND B = B OR NOT A

A nice result from this XAND definition is that any dual-input binary function can be expressed concisely using no more than one logical function or gate.

            +---+---+---+---+
   If A is: | 1 | 0 | 1 | 0 |
  and B is: | 1 | 1 | 0 | 0 |
            +---+---+---+---+
    Then:        yields:     
+-----------+---+---+---+---+
| FALSE     | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |
| A NOR B   | 0 | 0 | 0 | 1 |
| A XAND B  | 0 | 0 | 1 | 0 |
| NOT B     | 0 | 0 | 1 | 1 |
| B XAND A  | 0 | 1 | 0 | 0 |
| NOT A     | 0 | 1 | 0 | 1 |
| A XOR B   | 0 | 1 | 1 | 0 |
| A NAND B  | 0 | 1 | 1 | 1 |
| A AND B   | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 |
| A XNOR B  | 1 | 0 | 0 | 1 |
| A         | 1 | 0 | 1 | 0 |
| B XNAND A | 1 | 0 | 1 | 1 |
| B         | 1 | 1 | 0 | 0 |
| A XNAND B | 1 | 1 | 0 | 1 |
| A OR B    | 1 | 1 | 1 | 0 |
| TRUE      | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 |
+-----------+---+---+---+---+

Note that XAND and XNAND lack reflexivity.

This XNAND definition is extensible if we add numbered kinds of exclusive-ANDs to correspond to their corresponding minterms. Then XAND must have ceil(lg(n)) or more inputs, with the unused msbs all zeroes. The normal kind of XAND is written without a number unless used in the context of other kinds.

The various kinds of XAND or XNAND gates are useful for decoding.

XOR is also extensible to any number of bits. The result is one if the number of ones is odd, and zero if even. If you complement any input or output bit of an XOR, the function becomes XNOR, and vice versa.

I have seen no definition for XNOT, I will propose a definition:

Let it to relate to high-impedance (Z, no signal, or perhaps null valued Boolean type Object).

0xnot 0 = Z
0xnot 1 = Z
1xnot 0 = 1
1xnot 1 = 0
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Your exhaustive list doesn't include 0 (false). –  cHao Sep 25 '13 at 21:55
    
Thanks. I was in the process of editing. –  Shaneyfelt Sep 25 '13 at 22:29
    
XAND and XNAND are listed in Wikipedia as "contradiction" (ie: FALSE) and "tautology" (TRUE), respectively. Do you have a link to some document that defines these two operations differently? –  cHao Sep 30 '13 at 14:34
    
Read "Henceforth". Why use a logic gate for T or F when you could tie directly to HI or LO? Nevertheless, using this definition, A XAND A = FALSE, A XNAND A = TRUE. –  Shaneyfelt Oct 2 '13 at 22:39
    
Not that WP is authoritative or reliable, but out of curiosity, which WP article is it? It didn't seem to show up under contradiction, tautology or logic articles; and there seems to be no article dedicated to XAND or XNAND or "exclusive and" or "exclusive nand". –  Shaneyfelt Oct 8 '13 at 2:21

XOR behaves like Austin explained, as an exclusive OR, either A or B but not both and neither yields false.

There are 16 possible logical operators for two inputs since the truth table consists of 4 combinations there are 16 possible ways to arrange two boolean parameters and the corresponding output.

They all have names according to this wikipedia article

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Have a look

x   y      A    B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N

·   ·      T    ·   T   ·   T   ·   T   ·   T   ·   T   ·   T   ·
·   T      ·    T   T   ·   ·   T   T   ·   ·   T   T   ·   ·   T
T   ·      ·    ·   ·   T   T   T   T   ·   ·   ·   ·   T   T   T
T   T      ·    ·   ·   ·   ·   ·   ·   T   T   T   T   T   T   T

A) !(x OR y)    
B) !(x) AND y   
C) !(x) 
D) x AND !(y)   
E) !(y) 
F) x XOR y  
G) !(x AND y)   
H) x AND y  
I) !(x XOR y)   
J) y    
K) !(x) OR y    
L) x    
M) x OR !(y)    
N) x OR y
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First comes the logic, then the name, possibly patterned on previous naming.

Thus 0+0=0; 0+1=1; 1+0=1; 1+1=1 - for some reason this is called OR.

Then 0-0=0; 0-1=1; 1-0=1; 1-1=0 - it looks like OR except ... let's call it XOR.

Also 0*0=0; 0*1=0; 1*0=0; 1*1=1 - for some reason this is called AND.

Then 0~0=0; 0~1=0; 1~0=0; 1~1=0 - it looks like AND except ... let's call it XAND.

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The truth tables on Wiki clarify http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logic_gate There is no XAND, and that is the end of part 1 of the questions legitimacy. [The point is you can always make do without it.]

I personally have mistaken XNOT (which also doesn't exist) for NAND and NOR which are theoretically the only thing you need to make all the other gates link

I believe the confusion stems from the fact that you can use either NAND or NOR (to create everything else [but they are not needed together]), so it's thought of as one thing that's both NAND and NOR together, which basically leaves the mind to supplant the remaining name XNOT which isn't used so it's what I wrongly call XNOT meaning it's either NAND or NOR.

I suppose one could also wrongly in quick discussion try to use the XAND like I do XNOT, to refer to the "a single gate (copied in various arrangements) makes all other gates" logical reality.

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