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I have a bunch of JUnit 3 classes which extend TestCase and would like to automatically migrate them to be JUnit4 tests with annotations such as @Before, @After, @Test, etc.
Any tool out there to do this in a big batch run?

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Not answering the question, but you do realize that you can run JUnit3 tests under JUnit4 without modification, yes? –  Jeffrey Fredrick Nov 11 '08 at 8:44
1  
Unless you use Junit3 TestSuite, in which case you're stuffed. –  skaffman Oct 30 '09 at 9:53
3  
If you keep those JUnit 3 tests around, other developers (depending on your team size) will keep copying them to new tests. And if they need to temporary disable a test (yes, the shouldn't, but sometimes they will need to), they 'll keep renaming it from testX to FIMXEtestX instead of annotating it with @Ignore. So you won't have any idea how many tests are currently being ignored (so how worried you should be). Just take any big project and look for regex "public void \w+test" –  Geoffrey De Smet Dec 24 '10 at 8:54

6 Answers 6

up vote 32 down vote accepted
+100

In my opinion, it cannot be that hard. So let's try it:

0. Imports

You need to import three annotations:

import org.junit.After;
import org.junit.Before;
import org.junit.Test;`

After you've made the next few changes, you won't need import junit.framework.TestCase;.

1. Annotate test* Methods

All methods beginning with public void test must be preceded by the @Test annotation. This task is easy with a regex.

2. Annotate SetUp and TearDown methods

Eclipse generates following setUp() method:

@Override
protected void setUp() throws Exception { }

Must be replaced by:

@Before
public void setUp() throws Exception { }

Same for tearDown():

@Override
protected void tearDown() throws Exception { }

replaced by

@After
public void tearDown() throws Exception { }

3. Get rid of extends TestCase

Remove exactly one occurence per file of the string

" extends TestCase"

4. Remove main methods?

Probably it's necessary to remove/refactor existing main methods that will execute the test.

5. Convert suite() method to @RunWithClass

According to saua's comment, there must be a conversion of the suite() method. Pattern will follow. Thanks, saua!

Conclusion

I think, it's done very easy via a set of regular expressions, even if it will kill my brain ;)

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The imports can be cleaned up automatically by Eclipse (Ctrl + Shift + O) –  Dónal Mar 24 '09 at 13:21
    
I don't think, that he wants to do this with a bunch of files. And they should be runnable. –  guerda Mar 24 '09 at 13:23
2  
I'd add conversion of suite() methods to @RunWith(Suite.class) @SuiteCkasses() –  Joachim Sauer Mar 27 '09 at 13:12
1  
the setUp(), tearDown() methods have to be public in JUnit4 –  awx Nov 13 '11 at 23:10
    
@awx: Thanks, I updated it! –  guerda Nov 25 '11 at 12:30

Here are the actual regular expressions I used to execute furtelwart's suggestions:

// Add @Test
Replace:
^[ \t]+(public +void +test)
With:
    @Test\n    $1
Regular Expression: on
Case sensitive: on
File name filter:
*Test.java

// Remove double @Test's on already @Test annotated files
Replace:
^[ \t]+@Test\n[ \t]+@Test
With:
    @Test
Regular Expression: on
Case sensitive: on
File name filter:
*Test.java


// Remove all empty setUp's
Replace:
^[ \*]+((public|protected) +)?void +setUp\(\)[^\{]*\{\s*(super\.setUp\(\);)?\s*\}\n([ \t]*\n)?
With nothing
Regular Expression: on
Case sensitive: on
File name filter:
*Test.java

// Add @Before to all setUp's
Replace:
^([ \t]+@Override\n)?[ \t]+((public|protected) +)?(void +setUp\(\))
With:
    @Before\n    public void setUp()
Regular Expression: on
Case sensitive: on
File name filter:
*Test.java

// Remove double @Before's on already @Before annotated files
Replace:
^[ \t]+@Before\n[ \t]+@Before
With:
    @Before
Regular Expression: on
Case sensitive: on
File name filter:
*Test.java


// Remove all empty tearDown's
Replace:
^[ \*]+((public|protected) +)?void +tearDown\(\)[^\{]*\{\s*(super\.tearDown\(\);)?\s*\}\n([ \t]*\n)?
With nothing
Regular Expression: on
Case sensitive: on
File name filter:
*Test.java

// Add @After to all tearDown's
Replace:
^([ \t]+@Override\n)?[ \t]+((public|protected) +)?(void +tearDown\(\))
With:
    @After\n    public void tearDown()
Regular Expression: on
Case sensitive: on
File name filter:
*Test.java

// Remove double @After's on already @After annotated files
Replace:
^[ \t]+@After\n[ \t]+@After
With:
    @After
Regular Expression: on
Case sensitive: on
File name filter:
*Test.java


// Remove old imports, add new imports
Replace:
^([ \t]*import[ \t]+junit\.framework\.Assert;\n)?[ \t]*import[ \t]+junit\.framework\.TestCase;
With:
import org.junit.After;\nimport org.junit.Before;\nimport org.junit.Test;\nimport static org.junit.Assert.*;
Regular Expression: on
Case sensitive: on
File name filter:
*Test.java


// Remove all extends TestCase
Replace:
[ \t]+extends[ \t]+TestCase[ \t]+\{
With:
 {
Regular Expression: on
Case sensitive: on
File name filter:
*Test.java



// Look for import junit.framework;
Find:
import junit\.framework
Manually fix
Regular Expression: on
Case sensitive: on


// Look for ignored tests (FIXME, disabled, ...)
Find:
public[ \t]+void[ \t]+\w+test
Manually fix
Regular Expression: on
Case sensitive: on


// Look for dummy/empty tests
Find:
public[ \t]+void[ \t]+test[\w\d]*\(\s*\)\s*\{\s*(//[^\n]*)?\s*\}
Manually fix
Regular Expression: on
Case sensitive: on

Note: it's important to do them in the order shown above.

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Is there a way to run this? –  allyourcode May 15 '13 at 20:55
    
Yes. In IntelliJ, do "Replace in path" (ctrl-shift-r) and fill in that dialog for each of these. For those that need to be done manually, use "Find in path" (ctrl-shift-f). –  Geoffrey De Smet May 17 '13 at 8:27

I don't know of a tool that would do this at the moment - I'd expect Eclipse to provide some plugin fairly shortly - but you could knock up a simple source tree exploring Java class that would do it for you if you only want to do a basic conversion. I had to write something similar to automatically generate skeleton test cases for a legacy application so I've got a fair amount of the support code already. You're welcome to use it.

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1  
Do you use java6 AST feature or eclipse AST ? Anyway, I am interested also: may be you may consider making this question a 'code-challenge' and publish your anonymized code on DZones ? (see stackoverflow.com/questions/190007 for an example of 'code-chalenge') –  VonC Nov 5 '08 at 12:10

There are, to my best knowledge, no available migration tools (yet). What I know is this:

  • Last year, at OOPSLA in Nashville, was a paper about API migration but alas their tools seems not be openly available. I'll provide the link to the paper, (even though I dare it is of little use for you since it is rather theory heavy): "Annotation Refactoring: Inferring Upgrade Transformations for Legacy Applications".

  • Above, I wrote "no available tool (yet)" because my student Lea Hänsenberger is currently working on an auotmated API migration from, not onyl, JUnit 4 a to JExample, but also from JUnit 3 to JUnit 4. Please follow JExample on Twitter to get notified when she releases a first beta.

I hope this information was of help for you.

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Nice post. I did the upgrade using Netbeans with the following RegEx strings: (First line search-string, second one replace-string)

public void test
@Test\n    public void test

@Override\n.*protected void onSetUp
@Before\n    protected void onSetUp

@Override\n.*protected void onTearDown
@After\n    protected void onTearDown

Don't forget to flag the Regular Expression checkbox!

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We are in the middle of migrating a reasonably large code base to JUnit4. Since this is the second time I'm doing a migration such as this, I decided to save the code somewhere:

https://github.com/FranciscoBorges/junit3ToJunit4

It deals with more corner cases than the ones enumerated in answers above. Such as:

  • calls to TestCase.setUp() and TestCase.tearDown()
  • calls to TestCase(String) constructor within a sub-class constructor
  • calls to TestCase.assert* methods that moved to Assert.
  • fixing package names junit.framework to org.junit
  • etc
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