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coming from my other question is there a way to get by-name-parameters for constructors working? I need a way to provide a code-block which is executed on-demand/lazy/by-name inside an object and this code-block must be able to access the class-methods as if the code-block were part of the class.

Following Testcase fails:

package test

class ByNameCons(code: => Unit) {

    def exec() = {
        println("pre-code")
        code
        println("post-code")
    }

    def meth() = println("method")

    def exec2(code2: => Unit) = {
        println("pre-code")
        code2
        println("post-code")
    }
}


object ByNameCons {

    def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
        val tst = new ByNameCons {
            println("foo")
            meth() // knows meth() as code is part of ByNameCons
        }
        tst.exec() // ByName fails (executed right as constructor)


        println("--------")


        tst.exec2 { // ByName works
            println("foo")
            //meth() // does not know meth() as code is NOT part of ByNameCons
        }       
    }
}

Output:

foo
method
pre-code
post-code
--------
pre-code
foo
post-code
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I'm using the Scala 2.8 nightlies. –  hotzen Apr 15 '10 at 16:28
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is because when you're making an instance like this:

val tst = new ByNameCons {
  ...
}

.. you're actually creating an anonymous class, like in java. The above code is the same as:

val tst = new ByNameCons() { ... }

.. while the correct syntax for passing by-name is:

val tst = new ByNameCons( { ... } )

You cant omit parentheses the same way for constructors as with functions.

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could you give an example of what would be placed inside of val tst = new ByNameCons( { ... } )'s braces? –  Kevin Meredith Jan 23 at 3:14
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val tst = new ByNameCons( {
   println("foo")  
} )

Thought it is probably just easier to do this:

object ByNameCons {
  def apply(code: => Unit) = new ByNameCons(code)
}

val tst = ByNameCons { // no "new" here -- can't mix traits either
  println("foo")
}
share|improve this answer
    
but both variations would not be part of ByNameCons and do not know ByNameCons' Methods, so it wouldnt be possible for the passed code to call meth() if ByNameCons { def meth() .. } –  hotzen Apr 16 '10 at 16:21
    
@hotzen true. I didn't realize you wanted them to be part of ByNameCons. –  Daniel C. Sobral Apr 16 '10 at 18:35
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I dont know why, but it appears that using {} or () when creating the class changes the behavior. Using the following class,

class Coder(code: => Unit) {
  def exec = { 
    println("before")
    code
    println("after")}
  }
}

scala> val brackets = new Coder {println("testing")}
testing
brackets: Coder = $anon$1@1af7a03
scala> brackets exec
before
after

Now instead if defined another way,

scala> val parens = new Coder(println("testing"))
parens: Coder = Coder@dca3ed
scala> parens exec
before
testing
after

as desired. It seems as if in the first notation, the compiler is interpreting the brackets as a block to be evaluated to Unit, instead of an anonymous function which, when called, evaluates to Unit.

FWIW, using ({ ... }) also works fine.

share|improve this answer
    
same problem as in Daniel's Post, the code is not part of the Class and so is not able to access Coder's methods. –  hotzen Apr 16 '10 at 18:16
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