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I have a hash in Perl which has been dumped into from some legacy code the name of the key has now changed from simply reqHdrs to reqHdrs.bla

$rec->{reqHdrs.bla}

My problem is now I cant seem to access this field from the hash any ideas? The following is my error

Download Script Output: Bareword "reqHdrs" not allowed while "strict subs" in use
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5 Answers 5

If the key is a string, just:

$rec->{"reqHdrs.bla"}
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1  
...with a very tiny performance gain if you use a single-quoted ( ' ) rather than a double quoted ( " ) string ;) –  Carl Smotricz Apr 15 '10 at 17:14
    
@Carl: why is a single quote faster? –  Eli Bendersky Apr 15 '10 at 17:18
1  
The double quote allows you (always, not just in print statements) to use interpolated variables, e.g. "foo$number". It's my understanding that a double-quoted string will force Perl to make a quick check for a variable buried in the string before going ahead and doing what it would have done with a plain single-quoted string. –  Carl Smotricz Apr 15 '10 at 17:23
2  
@Eli: Judging by the output of perl -MO=Terse, it can. There's a school of thought that says you should use single-quotes where you can to provide a hint to the programmer that interpolation isn't necessary, though that can bite you if you ever add something requiring interpolation and forget to change the quotes. –  Michael Carman Apr 15 '10 at 19:05
1  
@Carl the difference is zero, not tiny. Perl is not PHP, and the difference between single quotes and double quotes is resolved at compile time so that "foo" and 'foo' generate identical code. –  hobbs Feb 18 '11 at 21:32

The bareword reqHdrs.bla is really just a... synonym, I guess, for a string. I'm not completely sure, but I think you should be able to simply use a string, e.g. 'reqHdrs.bla' as your key and that should retrieve your value OK.

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Enclose the key in quotes:

$rec->{'reqHdrs.bla'}
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As described in perldoc perldata:

...An identifier within such curlies is forced to be a string, as is any simple identifier within a hash subscript. Neither need quoting. Our earlier example, $days{'Feb'} can be written as $days{Feb} and the quotes will be assumed automatically. But anything more complicated in the subscript will be interpreted as an expression. This means for example that $version{2.0}++ is equivalent to $version{2}++, not to $version{'2.0'}++.

In general, if you have a hash key with a character outside the [A-Za-z0-9_] range, use quotes (either single or double) inside the braces. As with normal strings, contents in double quotes will be parsed for any contained variables, while single quoted strings are taken literally:

use strict; use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;
my $x = 1;
my %hash = (
    bare_string => 'hi there',
    "not a bare string" => 'yup',
);
$hash{'$x'} = 'foo';
$hash{"$x"} = 'bar';
print Dumper(\%hash);

prints:

$VAR1 = {
      'bare_string' => 'hi there',
      'not a bare string' => 'yup',
      '$x' => 'foo'
      '1' => 'bar',
    };
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1  
Upvote for the most comprehensive and helpful answer of the lot. :) –  Carl Smotricz Apr 15 '10 at 17:29

According to perldoc perldata that when an identifier is used within curlies, such as when accessing a hash value via a key, that identifier is assumed to be a string and is treated as such. Quotes will be assumed automatically, however, anything more complicated can be interpreted.

From perldata

In fact, an identifier within such curlies is forced to be a string, as is any simple identifier within a hash subscript. Neither need quoting. Our earlier example, $days{'Feb'} can be written as $days{Feb} and the quotes will be assumed automatically. But anything more complicated in the subscript will be interpreted as an expression. This means for example that $version{2.0}++ is equivalent to $version{2}++ , not to $version{'2.0'}++ .

Since the . is used for string concatenation, the interpreter I'm guessing is trying to concat those two strings together. Regardless it's always better to just use quotes to make it explicit, and if you have strict on it will probably throw a "bareword not allowed" error.

The solution to your problem:

$rec->{'reqHdrs.bla'}
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I did not see the previous post that quoted the same snippet from perldata. –  Logan Apr 15 '10 at 17:54

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