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So why is this not working? I'm creating a regex that will match a formula (which is then part of a larger standard description). But I'm stuck here, as it doesn't appear to want to match embedded formulas within a formula.

stat        = /(Stat3|Stat2|Stat1)/

number_sym  = /[0-9]*/
formula_sym = /((target's )?#{stat}|#{number_sym}|N#{number_sym})\%?/
math_sym    = /(\+|\-|\*|\/|\%)/

formula     = /^\((#{formula}|#{formula_sym})( #{math_sym} (#{formula}|#{formula_sym}))?\)$/

p "(target's Stat2 * N1%)".match(formula).to_s #matches
p "((target's Stat2 * N1%) + 3)".match(formula).to_s #no match
p "(Stat1 + ((target's Stat2 * N1%) + 3))".match(formula).to_s #no match
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you use the #{ } syntax, Ruby converts the Regexp object to a string using to_s. Look what happens when you convert a Regexp object to a string:

irb> re = /blah/
  => /blah/
irb> re.to_s
  => "(?-mix:blah)"
irb> "my regex: #{re}"
  => "my regex: (?-mix:blah)"
irb> /my regex: #{re}/
  => /my regex: (?-mix:blah)/

To get the string you want (in my example, "blah"), use the Regexp#source method:

irb> re.source
"blah"

So to use your example:

formula_sym = /((target's )?#{stat.source}|#{number_sym.source}|N#{number_sym.source})\%?/
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thanks ... and I did discover why it wasn't working ... guess I should have phrased my question as "how can I get it working" .... looks like #{formula.source} showed that formula was still nil. –  Reed Debaets Apr 15 '10 at 18:53
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You can't use recursion like that: the #{formula}s in your definition of formula are converted into empty strings. What you want is beyond regular expression's ability -- regular expressions cannot even match nested parentheses. I suspect you will need an actual parser to do what you want. Check out treetop, for example.

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excellent ... treetop will allow me to migrate my current definition spec into it easily. Thanks! –  Reed Debaets Apr 15 '10 at 19:12
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/(
  (?<non_grouping_char>
    [^\(\{\[\<\)\}\]\>]
  ){0}
  (?<parens_group>
    \( \g<content> \)
  ){0}
  (?<brackets_group>
    \[ \g<content> \]
  ){0}
  (?<chevrons_group>
    \< \g<content> \>
  ){0}
  (?<braces_group>
    \{ \g<content> \}
  ){0}
  (?<balanced_group>
    (?>
      \g<parens_group>   |
      \g<brackets_group> |
      \g<chevrons_group> |
      \g<braces_group>
    )
  ){0}
  (?<content>
    (?> \g<balanced_group> | \g<non_grouping_char> )*
  ){0}
  \A \g<content> \Z
)/uix

Beer me if this helps you. Works for me. Works in any regexp engine that allows named groups. It will validate any content that has either no groups, or groups of nesting characters, to any depth.

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If we meet, sure I'll pay you a beer. What is your favorite flavour ? :) Since then , I vote up ! –  Alex Oct 11 '12 at 8:42
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