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My PHP experience is rather limited. I've just inherited some stuff that looks odd to me, and I'd like to know if this is a standard way to do things. The page which shows up in the browser location (e.g. www.example.com/example_page) has something like:

<?
$title = "Page Title";
$meta = "Some metadata";
require("pageheader.inc");
?>
<!-- Content -->

Then pageheader.inc has stuff like:

<?
@$title = ($title) ? $title : "";
@$meta = ($meta) ? $meta : "";
?>
<html>
<head>
<title><?=$title?></title
</head>
<!-- and so forth -->

Maybe others find this style useful, but it confuses me. I suppose this could be a step toward a rudimentary content management system, but the way it works here I'd think it adds to the processing the server has to do without reducing the load on the web developer enough to make it worth the effort.

So, is this a normal way to create pages with PHP? Or should I pull all this in favor of a better approach?

Also, I know that "<?" (vs. "<?php" ) is undesirable; I'm just reproducing what is in the code.

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@Skilldrick: Thanks for the fix! –  GreenMatt Apr 15 '10 at 20:08

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, it's certainly not an invalid way to do it - but it might be a little cumbersome to read and maintain. I wouldn't say there's a "normal" way to do anything like this in PHP. At the end of the day, you're outputting variables into HTML - so there aren't a variety of options without using a dedicated templating engine (and/or heading towards a more MVC-based approach, as mentioned by ryeguy).

My suggestion: if it doesn't suit your preferred style, change it. The most important thing, if you're going to be developing and maintaining it, is that you can work with it comfortably, and efficiently.

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It's kind of on the right track towards MVC. MVC is all about separation of concerns. The idea here is that the first snippet sets values, and then pageheader.inc outputs them. This keeps logic out of the view.

It's done very sloppily.

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PHP is a very fragmented community with no "standard" way of doing things. That said, it appears the pageheader.inc example you posted can be simplified. The code at the top is doing you no good. This alone would suffice:

<html>
<head>
<title><?=@$title?></title>
</head>

If you're looking for some direction on architecture and best practices, I'd highly recommend checking out a popular PHP framework like Codeigniter or Kohana.

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1  
For clarity, the @ symbol suppresses errors. (In this case, a notice that the variable is unset.) –  Paul Lammertsma Apr 16 '10 at 7:43

There are essentially two approaches you can use, and they are inverses of each other. You have an example of one approach, where each page has its own content is responsible for including the header, footer, and other common data. There is nothing particularly wrong with this approach. The second approach is to have a single page that is responsible for including the header, footer, and content. This is far more common applications using popular PHP frameworks.

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I've used that style a lot on simple sites like 5-10 page brochure-ware sites where I want some centralised code e.g creating menus and page headers from a few variables, but don't want a full-blown MVC structure as it's be overkill.

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You might want to take a look at this article over on oreilly.com :

Understanding MVC in PHP

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