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Being used to (and potentially spoiled by) MSSQL, I'm wondering how I can get at tables size in Oracle 10g. I have googled it so I'm now aware that I may not have as easy an option as sp_spaceused. Still the potential answers I got are most of the time outdated or don't work. Probably because I'm no DBA on the schema I'm working with.

Would anyone have solutions and or recommendations?

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if having an proc give the answer is being spoiled, then take the answers you got from here and wrap them into a procedure and call it... dun dun duh... sp_spaceused. There's really little magic to it. –  Mark Brady Nov 5 '08 at 16:31

16 Answers 16

You might be interested in this query. It tells you how much space is allocated for each table taking into account the indexes and any LOBs on the table. Often you are interested to know "How much spaces the the Purchase Order table take, including any indexes" rather than just the table itself. You can always delve into the details. Note that this requires access to the DBA_* views.

COLUMN TABLE_NAME FORMAT A32
COLUMN OBJECT_NAME FORMAT A32
COLUMN OWNER FORMAT A10

SELECT
   owner, table_name, TRUNC(sum(bytes)/1024/1024) Meg
FROM
(SELECT segment_name table_name, owner, bytes
 FROM dba_segments
 WHERE segment_type = 'TABLE'
 UNION ALL
 SELECT i.table_name, i.owner, s.bytes
 FROM dba_indexes i, dba_segments s
 WHERE s.segment_name = i.index_name
 AND   s.owner = i.owner
 AND   s.segment_type = 'INDEX'
 UNION ALL
 SELECT l.table_name, l.owner, s.bytes
 FROM dba_lobs l, dba_segments s
 WHERE s.segment_name = l.segment_name
 AND   s.owner = l.owner
 AND   s.segment_type = 'LOBSEGMENT'
 UNION ALL
 SELECT l.table_name, l.owner, s.bytes
 FROM dba_lobs l, dba_segments s
 WHERE s.segment_name = l.index_name
 AND   s.owner = l.owner
 AND   s.segment_type = 'LOBINDEX')
WHERE owner in UPPER('&owner')
GROUP BY table_name, owner
HAVING SUM(bytes)/1024/1024 > 10  /* Ignore really small tables */
ORDER BY SUM(bytes) desc
;
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice one, thanks a lot! –  Petro Semeniuk Jun 19 '12 at 1:44

First off, I would generally caution that gathering table statistics in order to do space analysis is a potentially dangerous thing to do. Gathering statistics may change query plans, particularly if the DBA has configured a statistics gathering job that uses non-default parameters that your call is not using, and will cause Oracle to re-parse queries that utilize the table in question which can be a performance hit. If the DBA has intentionally left some tables without statistics (common if your OPTIMIZER_MODE is CHOOSE), gathering statistics can cause Oracle to stop using the rule-based optimizer and start using the cost-based optimizer for a set of queries which can be a major performance headache if it is done unexpectedly in production. If your statistics are accurate, you can query USER_TABLES (or ALL_TABLES or DBA_TABLES) directly without calling GATHER_TABLE_STATS. If your statistics are not accurate, there is probably a reason for that and you don't want to disturb the status quo.

Second, the closest equivalent to the SQL Server sp_spaceused procedure is likely Oracle's DBMS_SPACE package. Tom Kyte has a nice show_space procedure that provides a simple interface to this package and prints out information similar to what sp_spaceused prints out.

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-- Tables + Size MB
select owner, table_name, round((num_rows*avg_row_len)/(1024*1024)) MB 
from all_tables 
where owner not like 'SYS%'  -- Exclude system tables.
and num_rows > 0  -- Ignore empty Tables.
order by MB desc -- Biggest first.
;


--Tables + Rows
select owner, table_name, num_rows
 from all_tables 
where owner not like 'SYS%'  -- Exclude system tables.
and num_rows > 0  -- Ignore empty Tables.
order by num_rows desc -- Biggest first.
;

Note: These are estimates, made more accurate with gather statistics:

exec dbms_utility.analyze_schema(user,'COMPUTE');
share|improve this answer
    
These statistics may be null (num_rows, avg_row_len), you need to make some analysis before via the following statement ANALYZE TABLE your_table COMPUTE STATISTICS –  Brice Dec 5 '13 at 15:49
    
Tough analyzing these may be very long ! –  Brice Dec 5 '13 at 16:13

First, gather optimiser stats on the table (if you haven't already):

begin
   dbms_stats.gather_table_stats('MYSCHEMA','MYTABLE');
end;
/

WARNING: As Justin says in his answer, gathering optimiser stats affects query optimisation and should not be done without due care and consideration!

Then find the number of blocks occupied by the table from the generated stats:

select blocks, empty_blocks, num_freelist_blocks
from   all_tables
where  owner = 'MYSCHEMA'
and    table_name = 'MYTABLE';
  • The total number of blocks allocated to the table is blocks + empty_blocks + num_freelist_blocks.

  • blocks is the number of blocks that actually contain data.

Multiply the number of blocks by the block size in use (usually 8KB) to get the space consumed - e.g. 17 blocks x 8KB = 136KB.

To do this for all tables in a schema at once:

begin
    dbms_stats.gather_schema_stats ('MYSCHEMA');
end;
/

select table_name, blocks, empty_blocks, num_freelist_blocks
from   user_tables;

Note: Changes made to the above after reading this AskTom thread

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IIRC the tables you need are DBA_TABLES, DBA_EXTENTS or DBA_SEGMENTS and DBA_DATA_FILES. There are also USER_ and ALL_ versions of these for tables you can see if you don't have administration permissions on the machine.

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For sub partitioned tables and indexes we can use the following query



    SELECT owner, table_name, ROUND(sum(bytes)/1024/1024/1024, 2) GB
    FROM
    (SELECT segment_name table_name, owner, bytes
     FROM dba_segments
     WHERE segment_type IN ('TABLE', 'TABLE PARTITION', 'TABLE SUBPARTITION')
     UNION ALL
     SELECT i.table_name, i.owner, s.bytes
     FROM dba_indexes i, dba_segments s
     WHERE s.segment_name = i.index_name
     AND   s.owner = i.owner
     AND   s.segment_type IN ('INDEX', 'INDEX PARTITION', 'INDEX SUBPARTITION')
     UNION ALL
     SELECT l.table_name, l.owner, s.bytes
     FROM dba_lobs l, dba_segments s
     WHERE s.segment_name = l.segment_name
     AND   s.owner = l.owner
     AND   s.segment_type = 'LOBSEGMENT'
     UNION ALL
     SELECT l.table_name, l.owner, s.bytes
     FROM dba_lobs l, dba_segments s
     WHERE s.segment_name = l.index_name
     AND   s.owner = l.owner
     AND   s.segment_type = 'LOBINDEX')
    WHERE owner in UPPER('&owner')
    GROUP BY table_name, owner
    HAVING SUM(bytes)/1024/1024 > 10  /* Ignore really small tables */
    ORDER BY SUM(bytes) DESC
    ;

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Depends what you mean by "table's size". A table doesn't relate to a specific file on the file system. A table will reside on a tablespace (possibly multiple tablespaces if it is partitioned, and possibly multiple tablespaces if you also want to take into account indexes on the table). A tablespace will often have multiple tables in it, and may be spread across multiple files.

If you are estimating how much space you'll need for the table's future growth, then avg_row_len multiplied by the number of rows in the table (or number of rows you expect in the table) will be a good guide. But Oracle will leave some space free on each block, partly to allow for rows to 'grow' if they are updated, partly because it may not be possible to fit another entire row on that block (eg an 8K block would only fit 2 rows of 3K, though that would be an extreme example as 3K is a lot bigger than most row sizes). So BLOCKS (in USER_TABLES) might be a better guide.

But if you had 200,000 rows in a table, deleted half of them, then the table would still 'own' the same number of blocks. It doesn't release them up for other tables to use. Also, blocks are not added to a table individually, but in groups called an 'extent'. So there are generally going to be EMPTY_BLOCKS (also in USER_TABLES) in a table.

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Correction for partitioned tables:

SELECT owner, table_name, ROUND(sum(bytes)/1024/1024/1024, 2) GB
FROM
(SELECT segment_name table_name, owner, bytes
 FROM dba_segments
 WHERE segment_type IN ('TABLE', 'TABLE PARTITION', 'TABLE SUBPARTITION')
 UNION ALL
 SELECT i.table_name, i.owner, s.bytes
 FROM dba_indexes i, dba_segments s
 WHERE s.segment_name = i.index_name
 AND   s.owner = i.owner
 AND   s.segment_type IN ('INDEX', 'INDEX PARTITION', 'INDEX SUBPARTITION')
 UNION ALL
 SELECT l.table_name, l.owner, s.bytes
 FROM dba_lobs l, dba_segments s
 WHERE s.segment_name = l.segment_name
 and   s.owner = l.owner
 AND   s.segment_type in ('LOBSEGMENT', 'LOB PARTITION', 'LOB SUBPARTITION')
 UNION ALL
 SELECT l.table_name, l.owner, s.bytes
 FROM dba_lobs l, dba_segments s
 WHERE s.segment_name = l.index_name
 AND   s.owner = l.owner
 AND   s.segment_type = 'LOBINDEX')
WHERE owner in UPPER('&owner')
GROUP BY table_name, owner
HAVING SUM(bytes)/1024/1024 > 10  /* Ignore really small tables */
order by sum(bytes) desc
;
share|improve this answer

I found this to be a little more accurate:

SELECT
   owner, table_name, TRUNC(sum(bytes)/1024/1024/1024) GB
FROM
(SELECT segment_name table_name, owner, bytes
FROM dba_segments
WHERE segment_type in  ('TABLE','TABLE PARTITION')
UNION ALL
SELECT i.table_name, i.owner, s.bytes
FROM dba_indexes i, dba_segments s
WHERE s.segment_name = i.index_name
AND   s.owner = i.owner
AND   s.segment_type in ('INDEX','INDEX PARTITION')
UNION ALL
SELECT l.table_name, l.owner, s.bytes
FROM dba_lobs l, dba_segments s
WHERE s.segment_name = l.segment_name
AND   s.owner = l.owner
AND   s.segment_type IN ('LOBSEGMENT','LOB PARTITION')
UNION ALL
SELECT l.table_name, l.owner, s.bytes
FROM dba_lobs l, dba_segments s
WHERE s.segment_name = l.index_name
AND   s.owner = l.owner
AND   s.segment_type = 'LOBINDEX')
---WHERE owner in UPPER('&owner')
GROUP BY table_name, owner
HAVING SUM(bytes)/1024/1024 > 10  /* Ignore really small tables */
ORDER BY SUM(bytes) desc
share|improve this answer
5  
Looks somewhat like my answer? –  WW. Jun 19 '12 at 4:57

Heres a variant on WWs answer, it includes partitions and sub-partitions as others above have suggested, plus a column to show the TYPE: Table/Index/LOB etc

SELECT
   owner, "Type", table_name "Name", TRUNC(sum(bytes)/1024/1024) Meg
FROM
(  SELECT segment_name table_name, owner, bytes, 'Table' as "Type"
   FROM dba_segments
   WHERE segment_type in  ('TABLE','TABLE PARTITION', 'TABLE SUBPARTITION')
 UNION ALL
   SELECT i.table_name, i.owner, s.bytes, 'Index' as "Type"
   FROM dba_indexes i, dba_segments s
   WHERE s.segment_name = i.index_name
   AND   s.owner = i.owner
   AND   s.segment_type in ('INDEX','INDEX PARTITION', 'INDEX SUBPARTITION')
 UNION ALL
   SELECT l.table_name, l.owner, s.bytes, 'LOB' as "Type"
   FROM dba_lobs l, dba_segments s
   WHERE s.segment_name = l.segment_name
   AND   s.owner = l.owner
   AND   s.segment_type IN ('LOBSEGMENT','LOB PARTITION')
 UNION ALL
   SELECT l.table_name, l.owner, s.bytes, 'LOB Index' as "Type"
   FROM dba_lobs l, dba_segments s
   WHERE s.segment_name = l.index_name
   AND   s.owner = l.owner
   AND   s.segment_type = 'LOBINDEX')
   WHERE owner in UPPER('&owner')
GROUP BY table_name, owner, "Type"
HAVING SUM(bytes)/1024/1024 > 10  /* Ignore really small tables */
ORDER BY SUM(bytes) desc;
share|improve this answer

I modified the WW's query to provide more detailed information:

SELECT * FROM (
  SELECT
    owner, object_name, object_type, table_name, ROUND(bytes)/1024/1024 AS meg,
    tablespace_name, extents, initial_extent,
    ROUND(Sum(bytes/1024/1024) OVER (PARTITION BY table_name)) AS total_table_meg
  FROM (
    -- Tables
    SELECT owner, segment_name AS object_name, 'TABLE' AS object_type,
          segment_name AS table_name, bytes,
          tablespace_name, extents, initial_extent
    FROM   dba_segments
    WHERE  segment_type IN ('TABLE', 'TABLE PARTITION', 'TABLE SUBPARTITION')
    UNION ALL
    -- Indexes
    SELECT i.owner, i.index_name AS object_name, 'INDEX' AS object_type,
          i.table_name, s.bytes,
          s.tablespace_name, s.extents, s.initial_extent
    FROM   dba_indexes i, dba_segments s
    WHERE  s.segment_name = i.index_name
    AND    s.owner = i.owner
    AND    s.segment_type IN ('INDEX', 'INDEX PARTITION', 'INDEX SUBPARTITION')
    -- LOB Segments
    UNION ALL
    SELECT l.owner, l.column_name AS object_name, 'LOB_COLUMN' AS object_type,
          l.table_name, s.bytes,
          s.tablespace_name, s.extents, s.initial_extent
    FROM   dba_lobs l, dba_segments s
    WHERE  s.segment_name = l.segment_name
    AND    s.owner = l.owner
    AND    s.segment_type = 'LOBSEGMENT'
    -- LOB Indexes
    UNION ALL
    SELECT l.owner, l.column_name AS object_name, 'LOB_INDEX' AS object_type,
          l.table_name, s.bytes,
          s.tablespace_name, s.extents, s.initial_extent
    FROM   dba_lobs l, dba_segments s
    WHERE  s.segment_name = l.index_name
    AND    s.owner = l.owner
    AND    s.segment_type = 'LOBINDEX'
  )
  WHERE owner = UPPER('&owner')
)
AND total_table_meg > 10
ORDER BY total_table_meg DESC, meg DESC
/
share|improve this answer

there one more option that allows to get "select" size with joins, and table size as option too

-- 1
EXPLAIN PLAN
   FOR
      SELECT
            Scheme.Table_name.table_column1 AS "column1",
            Scheme.Table_name.table_column2 AS "column2",
            Scheme.Table_name.table_column3 AS "column3",
            FROM Scheme.Table_name
       WHERE ;

SELECT * FROM TABLE (DBMS_XPLAN.display);
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select segment_name,segment_type,bytes/1024/1024 MB from dba_segments where segment_type='TABLENAME' and owner ='OWNERNAME' order by mb desc;

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Simple select that returns the raw sizes of the tables, based on the block size, also includes size with index

select table_name,(nvl (( select sum( blocks) from dba_indexes a,dba_segments b where a.index_name=b.segment_name and a.table_name=dba_tables.table_name ),0)+blocks)8192/1024 TotalSize,blocks8 tableSize from dba_tables order by 3

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select segment_name as tablename, sum(bytes/ (1024 * 1024 * 1024)) as tablesize_in_GB
From dba_segments /* if looking at tables not owned by you else use user_segments */
where segment_name = 'TABLE_WHOSE_SIZE_I_WANT_TO_KNOW'
and   OWNER = 'WHO OWNS THAT TABLE' /* if user_segments is used delete this line */ 
group by segment_name ;
share|improve this answer

I have the same variant as the last ones which calculates segments of table data, table indexes and blob-fields:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION
  SYS.RAZMER_TABLICY_RAW(pNazvanie in varchar, pOwner in varchar2)
return number
is
  val number(16);
  sz number(16);
begin
  sz := 0;

  --Calculate size of table data segments
  select
    sum(t.bytes) into val
  from
    sys.dba_segments t
  where
    t.segment_name = upper(pNazvanie)
  and
    t.owner = upper(pOwner);
  sz := sz + nvl(val,0);

  --Calculate size of table indexes segments
  select
    sum(s.bytes) into val
  from
    all_indexes t
  inner join
    dba_segments s
  on
    t.index_name = s.segment_name
  where
    t.table_name = upper(pNazvanie)
  and
    t.owner = upper(pOwner);
  sz := sz + nvl(val,0);

  --Calculate size of table blob segments
  select
    sum(s.bytes) into val
  from
    all_lobs t
  inner join
    dba_segments s on t.segment_name = s.segment_name
  where
    t.table_name = upper(pNazvanie)
  and
    t.owner = upper(pOwner);
  sz := sz + nvl(val,0);

  return sz;

end razmer_tablicy_raw;

Source.

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