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I'm still working with this huge list of URLs, all the help I have received has been great.

At the moment I have the list looking like this (17000 URLs though):

http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=1
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=3
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=2
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=1
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=2
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=3
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=3

I can filter out the duplicates no problem with a couple of methods, awk etc. What I am really looking to do it take out the duplicate URLs but at the same time taking a count of how many times the URL exists in the list and printing the count next to the URL with a pipe separator. After processing the list it should look like this:

url | count
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=1 | 2
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=2 | 2
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=3 | 3

What method would be the fastest way to achieve this?

Cheers

share|improve this question
    
All previous questions from this user were Python -- I assumed this one was Python also. I put [python] on the question for that reason. –  S.Lott Nov 5 '08 at 12:07
    
And I deleted it because it's not in the question and I didn't know this user has only asked about Python. –  Vinko Vrsalovic Nov 5 '08 at 12:09
    
I was asking in general, any method would be fine, I am interested in seeing different approaches, all are very good :) –  RailsSon Nov 5 '08 at 14:11
    
I've added language-agnostic tag and deleted unix. –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 18 '08 at 2:00
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Are you're going to do this over and over again? If not, then "fastest" as in fastest to implement is probably

sort </file/of/urls | uniq --count | awk '{ print $2, " | ", $1}'

(not tested, I'm not near a UNIX command line)

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This is probably as fast as you can get without writing code.

    $ cat foo.txt
    http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=1
    http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=3
    http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=2
    http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=1
    http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=2
    http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=3
    http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=3
    $ sort foo.txt | uniq -c
          2 http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=1
          2 http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=2
          3 http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=3

Did a bit of testing, and it's not particularly fast, although for 17k it'll take little more than 1 second (on a loaded P4 2.8Ghz machine)

$ wc -l foo.txt
174955 foo.txt
vinko@mithril:~/i3media/2008/product/Pending$ time sort foo.txt | uniq -c
  54482 http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=1
  48212 http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=2
  72261 http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=3

real    0m23.534s
user    0m16.817s
sys     0m0.084s

$ wc -l foo.txt
14955 foo.txt
$ time sort foo.txt | uniq -c
   4233 http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=1
   4290 http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=2
   6432 http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=3

real    0m1.349s
user    0m1.216s
sys     0m0.012s

Although O() wins the game hands down, as usual. Tested S.Lott's solution and


$ cat pythoncount.py
from collections import defaultdict
myFile = open( "foo.txt", "ru" )
fq= defaultdict( int )
for n in myFile:
    fq[n] += 1
for n in fq.items():
    print "%s|%s" % (n[0].strip(),n[1])

$ wc -l foo.txt
14955 foo.txt

$ time python pythoncount.py
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=2|4290
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=1|4233
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=3|6432

real    0m0.072s
user    0m0.028s
sys     0m0.012s

$ wc -l foo.txt
1778955 foo.txt

$ time python pythoncount.py
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=2|504762
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=1|517557
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=3|756636

real    0m2.718s
user    0m2.440s
sys     0m0.072s
share|improve this answer
    
Could you test my solution too? stackoverflow.com/questions/264930/#297512 –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 18 '08 at 1:31
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In perl

[disclaimer: not able to test this code at the moment]

while (<>) {
    chomp;
    $occurences{$_}++;
}
foreach $url (sort keys %occurences) {
    printf "%s|%d\n", $url, $occurences{$url};
}
share|improve this answer
    
works. cat foo.txt | perlcount.pl . It's a tiny bit faster than the equivalent python's solution according to my testing –  Vinko Vrsalovic Nov 5 '08 at 12:20
    
It is the fastest (as in "time it takes") so far. It is 3 times faster then the nearest competitor. stackoverflow.com/questions/264930/#297512 –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 21 '08 at 15:19
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See Converting a list of tuples into a dict in python.

Essentially, you're doing the same thing with an int instead of a list.

This may be faster than the system sort because it's O(n). However, it's also Python, not C.

from collections import defaultdict
myFile = open( "urlFile", "ru" )
fq= defaultdict( int )
for n in myFile:
    fq[n] += 1

for url, count in fq.iteritems():
    print url.rstrip(), "|", count

On my little Dell D830, this processes 17000 URL's in 0.015 seconds.

share|improve this answer
    
Your little Dell D830 is faster than my workstation :-( –  Vinko Vrsalovic Nov 5 '08 at 12:25
    
Dual core. No background load. Also, I ran it a few times to get an average over 10 runs: 0.015 is worst-case, first time. After that, I guess cache is loaded and it gets faster. Average is 0.0125. –  S.Lott Nov 5 '08 at 12:30
    
Added printing part of the script. –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 18 '08 at 2:01
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Here is another version in Python:

import fileinput, itertools

urls = sorted(fileinput.input())
for url, sameurls in itertools.groupby(urls):
    print url.rstrip(), "|", sum(1 for _ in sameurls)

Example:

$ cat foo.txt
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=1
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=3
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=2
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=1
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=2
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=3
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=3

$ python countuniq.py foo.txt
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=1 | 2
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=2 | 2
http://www.domain.com/page?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=3 | 3

Performance:

C:\> timethis "sort urls17000.txt|uniq -c"
...
TimeThis :  Elapsed Time :  00:00:00.688

C:\> timethis python countuniq.py urls17000.txt
...
TimeThis :  Elapsed Time :  00:00:00.625

C:\> timethis python slott.py urls17000.txt
...
TimeThis :  Elapsed Time :  00:00:00.562

C:\> timethis perl toolkit.pl urls17000.txt
...
TimeThis :  Elapsed Time :  00:00:00.187

Conclusion: All solutions are under 1 second. The pipe is the slowest, S.Lott's solution is faster then the above python's version and toolkit's perl solution is the fastest.


C:\> timethis perl toolkit.pl urls1778955.txt
...
TimeThis :  Elapsed Time :  00:00:17.656

C:\> timethis "sort urls1778955.txt|uniq -c"
...
TimeThis :  Elapsed Time :  00:01:54.234

$ wc urls1778955.txt
1778955  1778955 81831930 urls1778955.txt

Hashing beats sorting for a large number of urls.

share|improve this answer
    
The relative distance is huge, Perl takes a third of the time, of the next fastest competitor. –  Brad Gilbert Nov 18 '08 at 4:46
    
@Brad: You're right. I've removed the remark. –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 21 '08 at 15:14
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