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I have a question about DDD. I'm building a application to learn DDD and I have a question about layering. I have an application that works like this:

UI layer calls => Application Layer -> Domain Layer -> Database

Here is a small example of how the code looks:

//****************UI LAYER************************
//Uses Ioc to get the service from the factory.
//This factory would be in the MyApp.Infrastructure.dll
IImplementationFactory factory = new ImplementationFactory();

//Interface and implementation for Shopping Cart service would be in MyApp.ApplicationLayer.dll
    IShoppingCartService service = factory.GetImplementationFactory<IShoppingCartService>();

    //This is the UI layer,
    //Calling into Application Layer
    //to get the shopping cart for a user.

    //Interface for IShoppingCart would be in MyApp.ApplicationLayer.dll
    //and implementation for IShoppingCart would be in MyApp.Model.
    IShoppingCart shoppingCart = service.GetShoppingCartByUserName(userName);

    //Show shopping cart information.
    //For example, items bought, price, taxes..etc
    ...

    //Pressed Purchase button, so even for when
    //button is pressed.
    //Uses Ioc to get the service from the factory again.
    IImplementationFactory factory = new ImplementationFactory();
    IShoppingCartService service = factory.GetImplementationFactory<IShoppingCartService>();
    service.Purchase(shoppingCart);


    //**********************Application Layer**********************
    public class ShoppingCartService : IShoppingCartService
    {
       public IShoppingCart GetShoppingCartByUserName(string userName)
       {
           //Uses Ioc to get the service from the factory.
           //This factory would be in the MyApp.Infrastructure.dll
           IImplementationFactory factory = new ImplementationFactory();

           //Interface for repository would be in MyApp.Infrastructure.dll
           //but implementation would by in MyApp.Model.dll
           IShoppingCartRepository repository = factory.GetImplementationFactory<IShoppingCartRepository>();

           IShoppingCart shoppingCart = repository.GetShoppingCartByUserName(username);
           //Do shopping cart logic like calculating taxes and stuff
           //I would put these in services but not sure?
           ...

           return shoppingCart;
       }

       public void Purchase(IShoppingCart shoppingCart)
       {
            //Do Purchase logic and calling out to repository
            ...
       }
    }

I've seem to put most of my business rules in services rather than the models and I'm not sure if this is correct? Also, i'm not completely sure if I have the laying correct? Do I have the right pieces in the correct place? Also should my models leave my domain model? In general I'm I doing this correct according DDD?

Thanks!

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looks good to me !!! –  Romain Hippeau Apr 16 '10 at 3:50

3 Answers 3

When you ask

Should my models leave my domain model?

I would say that if at all possible you should work to avoid shuffling data back and forth between different sets of objects in one program. Doing that would result in you going through a lot of tedium writing a lot of boring and error-prone code, you will have a redundant set of DTO objects that have to mirror your domain objects, also you get less mileage out of the methods you write because they only operate on either the DTOs or domain objects. All in all it is very painful and doesn't accomplish much. I try to have one set of domain objects that is passed around throughout the application.

(That doesn't mean there aren't cases where you really have a need to move data between different sets of objects, like when building an anti-corruption layer. Just don't go looking for trouble if it's not absolutely necessary.)

As for

IShoppingCart shoppingCart = repository.GetShoppingCartByUserName(username);
//Do shopping cart logic like calculating taxes and stuff
//I would put these in services but not sure?

one of the goals of Domain-Driven Design is to try to separate business logic from infrastructure code. Whatever you can figure out how to calculate using only the domain objects is better off going into the domain model, where you can write tests for it that do not involve the database. I would want to have the service pull an aggregate of domain objects, then have the business logic calculations happen in the domain objects, then have the service save the state changes that the calculations brought about in the domain objects.

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DDD works best when services (application layer) expose only commands on domain objects, not the objects themselves.

In you example I would create a service method like Purchase(strng productName, int quantity) which internally would get a ShoppingCart from Repository (don't have to use interface here) get a Product (by its name) from Repository and call cart.AddProduct(product, quantity)

not, the business logic of adding products to cart, calculating total amount, total weight or other business stuff is encapsulated in the mode.

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Thanks for your response. So the services should be static than and live in the Application Layer? I figured the services should implement an interface because it makes it easier to test. Also who is responsible for calling the business logic like calculating total amount? Does the repository do that? –  Michael Apr 16 '10 at 12:23
1  
If you call AddProduct on a cart, this cart is responsible for maintaining its own consistency so it should update any information that needs to be update (like total amount). Yes, it is good to implement interface in services, but since DDD says you should not place business logic in services, they are poor candidates for testing. But interfaces are useful when doing aspect oriented programming. I used to intercept invocation on my services and, in an AOP advice, begin/commit the transaction on database, log any exception and so on. –  Szymon Pobiega Apr 17 '10 at 10:26

You should have one thin layer between domain objects and services to manipulate with domain objects (recommended by Eric Evans). This object name is usually ending on “Manager”. For example PurchaseManager or similar. All logic that connect different domain objects (user, purchase, address …) is in this object.

  • Service call Manager.GetSomething()
  • Manager get data from different repositories, do business logic and return result
  • Manger Return Result but never return domain objects itself ! If you have domain object called User you should stick with naming convention you invent and map User to UserDataContract or similar. Don’t expose domain objects. It is extra work but you should not couple your domain model with UI.
  • Many times domain object has methods to do some business logic
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2  
Could you be specific about where the Eric Evans recommendation you reference came from? I don't remember anything like this in his book (I may have missed something, obviously). –  Nathan Hughes Apr 16 '10 at 18:15
    
I found this as a reference in one of my documents (don’t have book with me right now): There are important domain operations that can’t find a natural home in an Entity or Value object. Since our modeling paradigm is objects, we should try to fit them into objects. Sometimes we force those operations into an appropriate object, gradually slipping towards procedural programming. We end up with objects heaving names ending with “Manager”. They have no state of their own nor any meaning in the domain beyond the operation they host. –  Vladimir Kojic Apr 16 '10 at 20:08
2  
if I'm not mistaken, Evans is describing an anti-pattern in that section, not recommending it. He acknowledges that there are occasionally operations that don't fit into domain objects in which case it's appropriate to put those operations in a service - but strongly recommends that we try to avoid that and strive to put the logic into our domain model. –  Jeff Sternal Apr 19 '10 at 21:11
    
@Jeff - I agree that word “recommend” is probably misleading (thanks for comment). But for majority of serious applications you don’t return just collections of objects. If you have object A, object B and object C and some service requires mix of them plus some serious logic and calculations I use “Manager” object to open repository of A,B,C and get result. Way cleaner than trying to push everything to A,B or C. And "Manager" is a part of Domain Model. –  Vladimir Kojic Apr 20 '10 at 13:33

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