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I have the following code:

foreach (var control in this.Controls)
{

}

I want to do something like control.Hide() in there. But the items in the this.Controls collection are not of type Control (they are Object).

I can't seem to remember the safe way to cast this to call hide if it is really of type Control and do nothing otherwise. (I am a transplanted delphi programmer and I keep thinking something like control is Control.)

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's a case where you don't want to use var.

foreach (Control control in this.Controls)
{
    control.Hide();
}

does exactly what you want.

Test it if you do not believe.

For other scenarios where you could potentially have a mixed collection, you could do something like

foreach (var foo in listOfObjects.OfType<Foo>())
{

}
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I did not do this because resharper thought that the only other option for that collection was Object. I assumed (as I indicated in my question) that the values returned by the collection were of type Object and could be of different type of classes. –  Vaccano Apr 16 '10 at 4:14
1  
In this case R# is wrong and Anthong Pegram is right. All objects in the Controls collection will be of type Control, so it's safe to declare the iteration variable as Control. The other solutions are just over-complicating something that's really simple. –  EMP Apr 16 '10 at 4:18
1  
The ControlCollection is pre-Generics in C# and is thusly not strongly typed, which is why type inference on var pulls object instead of Control. However, you should be safe to say Control control rather than var control since the collection really only holds controls. Much like if you had an ArrayList containing only ints, you could say (int i in arrayList) even though it technically stores items as objects. –  Anthony Pegram Apr 16 '10 at 4:19

That's exactly it.

foreach (var control in this.Controls)
{
    if(control is Control) 
    {
        ((Control)control).Hide(); 
    }
}
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1  
-1: For C# 3, it's so much cleaner to use var control in this.Controls.OfType<Control>() –  280Z28 Apr 16 '10 at 4:49
    
Good to know, thanks. –  Anna Lear Apr 16 '10 at 12:12

All the other answers (confirming your hunch) are probably right.

I have encountered a situation where Type.IsAssignableFrom matched what I needed when is didn't. (Unfortunately, I don't remember now what the situation was.)

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Or as an Alternative you could also do

foreach(var control in this.Controls.OfType<Control>())
{
  control.Hide();
}
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(it is unclear if the OP knows that all the items are Controls - if not, OfType would be better than Cast) –  Marc Gravell Apr 16 '10 at 4:15
    
Yeah good point, Amended. –  Tim Jarvis Apr 16 '10 at 4:43
Control c = control as Control;
if (c != null)
    c.Hide();

or

if (control is Control)
    ((Control)control).Hide();
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You have them in the wrong order - as is preferable to is. –  280Z28 Apr 16 '10 at 4:50
    
Edited the order, to reflect the fact that 'as' is preferable to 'is'. –  MatthewKing Apr 16 '10 at 5:36

There are several ways to do this:

if (control is Control)
    ((Control)control).Hide();

or

if (control is Control)
    (control as Control).Hide();

or if you just want to iterate over the Controls,

foreach(var control in this.Controls.Cast<Control>())
    control.Hide();
share|improve this answer
    
-1: For each of your three examples, there is a better way to do it. The first two should be an as followed by a null check. The last should either use OfType instead of Cast, or use foreach(Control control in this.Controls), depending on the intended behavior. –  280Z28 Apr 16 '10 at 4:53

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