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I have the following code:

Using cmd As SqlCommand = Connection.CreateCommand
    cmd.CommandText = "UPDATE someTable SET Value = @Value"
    cmd.CommandText &= " WHERE Id = @Id"
    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Id", 1234)
    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Value", "myValue")
    cmd.ExecuteNonQuery
End Using

I wonder if there is any way to get the final SQL-Statment as a String, which should look like this:

UPDATE someTable SET Value = "myValue" WHERE Id = 1234

If anyone wonders why I would do this:

  • for logging (failed) statements
  • for having the possibility to copy & paste it to the Enterprise Manager for testing purposes
share|improve this question

10 Answers 10

up vote 30 down vote accepted

For logging purposes, I'm afraid there's no nicer way of doing this but to construct the string yourself:

string query = cmd.CommandText;

foreach (SqlParameter p in cmd.Parameters)
{
    query = query.Replace(p.ParameterName, p.Value.ToString());
}

Sorry, I forgot.. p.Value.ToString() should do the job.

share|improve this answer
    
If I do that, I'll have to distinguish between different datatypes. Then I could skip the parameterized query all together and execute that. –  dummy Nov 5 '08 at 14:37
    
Sorry, I forgot.. p.Value.ToString() should do the job. –  Kon Nov 5 '08 at 14:57
    
dummy: not really. if you execute a prepared statement, you are at risk for sql injection attack. +1 for the answer. –  Sunny Milenov Nov 5 '08 at 15:05
4  
Theres a gotcha Here. If I have "Param", and "differentParam" as parameters, it renders the differentParam useless as it replaces it to "ValueParam". assuming Param=Value. –  Alok Aug 30 '12 at 4:47
3  
The question doesn't deal with defensive coding techniques, therefore null reference checks are not part of the answer. The fact that it should be implemented is implied, therefore I don't see this as a constructive comment. –  Kon Mar 11 '13 at 14:49

If you're using SQL Server, you could use SQL Server Profiler (if you have it) to view the command string that is actually executed. That would be useful for copy/paste testing purpuses but not for logging I'm afraid.

share|improve this answer

You can't, because it does not generate any SQL.

The parameterized query (the one in CommandText) is sent to the SQL Server as the equivalent of a prepared statement. When you execute the command, the parameters and the query text are treated separately. At no point in time a complete SQL string is generated.

You can use SQL Profiler to take a look behind the scenes.

share|improve this answer

Profiler is hands-down your best option.

You might need to copy a set of statements from profiler due to the prepare + execute steps involved.

share|improve this answer
    
How exactly does that help with logging? –  Dan Mar 18 at 15:29

Whilst not perfect, here's something I knocked up something for TSQL - could be easily tweaked for other flavours... If nothing else it will give you a start point for your own improvements :)

This does an OK job on data types and output parameters etc similar to using "execute stored procedure" in SSMS. We mostly used SPs so the "text" command doesn't account for parameters etc

    public static String ParameterValueForSQL(this SqlParameter sp)
    {
        String retval = "";

        switch (sp.SqlDbType)
        {
            case SqlDbType.Char:
            case SqlDbType.NChar:
            case SqlDbType.NText:
            case SqlDbType.NVarChar:
            case SqlDbType.Text:
            case SqlDbType.Time:
            case SqlDbType.VarChar:
            case SqlDbType.Xml:
            case SqlDbType.Date:
            case SqlDbType.DateTime:
            case SqlDbType.DateTime2:
            case SqlDbType.DateTimeOffset:
                retval = "'" + sp.Value.ToString().Replace("'", "''") + "'";
                break;

            case SqlDbType.Bit:
                retval = (sp.Value.ToBooleanOrDefault(false)) ? "1" : "0";
                break;

            default:
                retval = sp.Value.ToString().Replace("'", "''");
                break;
        }

        return retval;
    }

    public static String CommandAsSql(this SqlCommand sc)
    {
        StringBuilder sql = new StringBuilder();
        Boolean FirstParam = true;

        sql.AppendLine("use " + sc.Connection.Database + ";");
        switch (sc.CommandType)
        {
            case CommandType.StoredProcedure:
                sql.AppendLine("declare @return_value int;");

                foreach (SqlParameter sp in sc.Parameters)
                {
                    if ((sp.Direction == ParameterDirection.InputOutput) || (sp.Direction == ParameterDirection.Output))
                    {
                        sql.Append("declare " + sp.ParameterName + "\t" + sp.SqlDbType.ToString() + "\t= ");

                        sql.AppendLine(((sp.Direction == ParameterDirection.Output) ? "null" : sp.ParameterValueForSQL()) + ";");

                    }
                }

                sql.AppendLine("exec [" + sc.CommandText + "]");

                foreach (SqlParameter sp in sc.Parameters)
                {
                    if (sp.Direction != ParameterDirection.ReturnValue)
                    {
                        sql.Append((FirstParam) ? "\t" : "\t, ");

                        if (FirstParam) FirstParam = false;

                        if (sp.Direction == ParameterDirection.Input)
                            sql.AppendLine(sp.ParameterName + " = " + sp.ParameterValueForSQL());
                        else

                            sql.AppendLine(sp.ParameterName + " = " + sp.ParameterName + " output");
                    }
                }
                sql.AppendLine(";");

                sql.AppendLine("select 'Return Value' = convert(varchar, @return_value);");

                foreach (SqlParameter sp in sc.Parameters)
                {
                    if ((sp.Direction == ParameterDirection.InputOutput) || (sp.Direction == ParameterDirection.Output))
                    {
                        sql.AppendLine("select '" + sp.ParameterName + "' = convert(varchar, " + sp.ParameterName + ");");
                    }
                }
                break;
            case CommandType.Text:
                sql.AppendLine(sc.CommandText);
                break;
        }

        return sql.ToString();
    }

this generates output along these lines...

use dbMyDatabase;
declare @return_value int;
declare @OutTotalRows   BigInt  = null;
exec [spMyStoredProc]
    @InEmployeeID = 1000686
    , @InPageSize = 20
    , @InPage = 1
    , @OutTotalRows = @OutTotalRows output
;
select 'Return Value' = convert(varchar, @return_value);
select '@OutTotalRows' = convert(varchar, @OutTotalRows);
share|improve this answer
2  
Nice job actually trying to tackle the problem here, up-voted for effort alone. –  Adam Tolley Apr 5 '11 at 15:36
    
This is quite helpful - thanks for sharing the code. –  Reed Rector Nov 4 '11 at 8:23
1  
What would be your "ToBooleanOrDefault(false)" method? –  Benoittr Oct 23 '13 at 16:41
2  
@Benoittr, you can see an implementation of ToBooleanOrDefault here: Question #3244850 –  Alexandre Marcondes Nov 4 '13 at 13:33

This solution works for me right now. Maybe it is usefull to someone. Please excuse all the redundancy.

    Public Shared Function SqlString(ByVal cmd As SqlCommand) As String
    Dim sbRetVal As New System.Text.StringBuilder()
    For Each item As SqlParameter In cmd.Parameters
        Select Case item.DbType
            Case DbType.String
                sbRetVal.AppendFormat("DECLARE {0} AS VARCHAR(255)", item.ParameterName)
                sbRetVal.AppendLine()
                sbRetVal.AppendFormat("SET {0} = '{1}'", item.ParameterName, item.Value)
                sbRetVal.AppendLine()

            Case DbType.DateTime
                sbRetVal.AppendFormat("DECLARE {0} AS DATETIME", item.ParameterName)
                sbRetVal.AppendLine()
                sbRetVal.AppendFormat("SET {0} = '{1}'", item.ParameterName, item.Value)
                sbRetVal.AppendLine()

            Case DbType.Guid
                sbRetVal.AppendFormat("DECLARE {0} AS UNIQUEIDENTIFIER", item.ParameterName)
                sbRetVal.AppendLine()
                sbRetVal.AppendFormat("SET {0} = '{1}'", item.ParameterName, item.Value)
                sbRetVal.AppendLine()

            Case DbType.Int32
                sbRetVal.AppendFormat("DECLARE {0} AS int", item.ParameterName)
                sbRetVal.AppendLine()
                sbRetVal.AppendFormat("SET {0} = {1}", item.ParameterName, item.Value)
                sbRetVal.AppendLine()

            Case Else
                Stop

        End Select
    Next

    sbRetVal.AppendLine("")
    sbRetVal.AppendLine(cmd.CommandText)

    Return sbRetVal.ToString()
End Function
share|improve this answer

I needed a similar command to string transformer to allow for more verbose logging, so I wrote this one. It will produce the text needed to re-execute the command in a new session including output parameters and structured parameters. It is lightly tested, but caveat emptor.

Example:

SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("GetEntity", con);
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@foobar", 1);
cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter(){
    ParameterName = "@outParam",
    Direction = ParameterDirection.Output,
    SqlDbType = System.Data.SqlDbType.Int
});
cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter(){
    Direction = ParameterDirection.ReturnValue
});
cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

will produce:

-- BEGIN COMMAND
DECLARE @foobar INT = 1;
DECLARE @outParam INT = NULL;
DECLARE @returnValue INT;
-- END PARAMS
EXEC @returnValue = GetEntity @foobar = @foobar, @outParam = @outParam OUTPUT
-- RESULTS
SELECT 1 as Executed, @returnValue as ReturnValue, @outParam as [@outParam];
-- END COMMAND

Implementation:

public class SqlCommandDumper
{
    public static string GetCommandText(SqlCommand sqc)
    {
        StringBuilder sbCommandText = new StringBuilder();

        sbCommandText.AppendLine("-- BEGIN COMMAND");

        // params
        for (int i = 0; i < sqc.Parameters.Count; i++)
            logParameterToSqlBatch(sqc.Parameters[i], sbCommandText);
        sbCommandText.AppendLine("-- END PARAMS");

        // command
        if (sqc.CommandType == CommandType.StoredProcedure)
        {
            sbCommandText.Append("EXEC ");

            bool hasReturnValue = false;
            for (int i = 0; i < sqc.Parameters.Count; i++)
            {
                if (sqc.Parameters[i].Direction == ParameterDirection.ReturnValue)
                    hasReturnValue = true;
            }
            if (hasReturnValue)
            {
                sbCommandText.Append("@returnValue = ");
            }

            sbCommandText.Append(sqc.CommandText);

            bool hasPrev = false;
            for (int i = 0; i < sqc.Parameters.Count; i++)
            {
                var cParam = sqc.Parameters[i];
                if (cParam.Direction != ParameterDirection.ReturnValue)
                {
                    if (hasPrev)
                        sbCommandText.Append(", ");

                    sbCommandText.Append(cParam.ParameterName);
                    sbCommandText.Append(" = ");
                    sbCommandText.Append(cParam.ParameterName);

                    if (cParam.Direction.HasFlag(ParameterDirection.Output))
                        sbCommandText.Append(" OUTPUT");

                    hasPrev = true;
                }
            }
        }
        else
        {
            sbCommandText.AppendLine(sqc.CommandText);
        }

        sbCommandText.AppendLine("-- RESULTS");
        sbCommandText.Append("SELECT 1 as Executed");
        for (int i = 0; i < sqc.Parameters.Count; i++)
        {
            var cParam = sqc.Parameters[i];

            if (cParam.Direction == ParameterDirection.ReturnValue)
            {
                sbCommandText.Append(", @returnValue as ReturnValue");
            }
            else if (cParam.Direction.HasFlag(ParameterDirection.Output))
            {
                sbCommandText.Append(", ");
                sbCommandText.Append(cParam.ParameterName);
                sbCommandText.Append(" as [");
                sbCommandText.Append(cParam.ParameterName);
                sbCommandText.Append(']');
            }
        }
        sbCommandText.AppendLine(";");

        sbCommandText.AppendLine("-- END COMMAND");
        return sbCommandText.ToString();
    }

    private static void logParameterToSqlBatch(SqlParameter param, StringBuilder sbCommandText)
    {
        sbCommandText.Append("DECLARE ");
        if (param.Direction == ParameterDirection.ReturnValue)
        {
            sbCommandText.AppendLine("@returnValue INT;");
        }
        else
        {
            sbCommandText.Append(param.ParameterName);

            sbCommandText.Append(' ');
            if (param.SqlDbType != SqlDbType.Structured)
            {
                logParameterType(param, sbCommandText);
                sbCommandText.Append(" = ");
                logQuotedParameterValue(param.Value, sbCommandText);

                sbCommandText.AppendLine(";");
            }
            else
            {
                logStructuredParameter(param, sbCommandText);
            }
        }
    }

    private static void logStructuredParameter(SqlParameter param, StringBuilder sbCommandText)
    {
        sbCommandText.AppendLine(" {List Type};");
        var dataTable = (DataTable)param.Value;

        for (int rowNo = 0; rowNo < dataTable.Rows.Count; rowNo++)
        {
            sbCommandText.Append("INSERT INTO ");
            sbCommandText.Append(param.ParameterName);
            sbCommandText.Append(" VALUES (");

            bool hasPrev = true;
            for (int colNo = 0; colNo < dataTable.Columns.Count; colNo++)
            {
                if (hasPrev)
                {
                    sbCommandText.Append(", ");
                }
                logQuotedParameterValue(dataTable.Rows[rowNo].ItemArray[colNo], sbCommandText);
                hasPrev = true;
            }
            sbCommandText.AppendLine(");");
        }
    }

    const string DATETIME_FORMAT_ROUNDTRIP = "o";
    private static void logQuotedParameterValue(object value, StringBuilder sbCommandText)
    {
        try
        {
            if (value == null)
            {
                sbCommandText.Append("NULL");
            }
            else
            {
                value = unboxNullable(value);

                if (value is string
                    || value is char
                    || value is char[]
                    || value is System.Xml.Linq.XElement
                    || value is System.Xml.Linq.XDocument)
                {
                    sbCommandText.Append('\'');
                    sbCommandText.Append(value.ToString().Replace("'", "''"));
                    sbCommandText.Append('\'');
                }
                else if (value is bool)
                {
                    // True -> 1, False -> 0
                    sbCommandText.Append(Convert.ToInt32(value));
                }
                else if (value is sbyte
                    || value is byte
                    || value is short
                    || value is ushort
                    || value is int
                    || value is uint
                    || value is long
                    || value is ulong
                    || value is float
                    || value is double
                    || value is decimal)
                {
                    sbCommandText.Append(value.ToString());
                }
                else if (value is DateTime)
                {
                    // SQL Server only supports ISO8601 with 3 digit precision on datetime,
                    // datetime2 (>= SQL Server 2008) parses the .net format, and will 
                    // implicitly cast down to datetime.
                    // Alternatively, use the format string "yyyy'-'MM'-'dd'T'HH':'mm':'ss'.'fffK"
                    // to match SQL server parsing
                    sbCommandText.Append("CAST('");
                    sbCommandText.Append(((DateTime)value).ToString(DATETIME_FORMAT_ROUNDTRIP));
                    sbCommandText.Append("' as datetime2)");
                }
                else if (value is DateTimeOffset)
                {
                    sbCommandText.Append('\'');
                    sbCommandText.Append(((DateTimeOffset)value).ToString(DATETIME_FORMAT_ROUNDTRIP));
                    sbCommandText.Append('\'');
                }
                else if (value is Guid)
                {
                    sbCommandText.Append('\'');
                    sbCommandText.Append(((Guid)value).ToString());
                    sbCommandText.Append('\'');
                }
                else if (value is byte[])
                {
                    var data = (byte[])value;
                    if (data.Length == 0)
                    {
                        sbCommandText.Append("NULL");
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        sbCommandText.Append("0x");
                        for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++)
                        {
                            sbCommandText.Append(data[i].ToString("h2"));
                        }
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    sbCommandText.Append("/* UNKNOWN DATATYPE: ");
                    sbCommandText.Append(value.GetType().ToString());
                    sbCommandText.Append(" *" + "/ '");
                    sbCommandText.Append(value.ToString());
                    sbCommandText.Append('\'');
                }
            }
        }

        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            sbCommandText.AppendLine("/* Exception occurred while converting parameter: ");
            sbCommandText.AppendLine(ex.ToString());
            sbCommandText.AppendLine("*/");
        }
    }

    private static object unboxNullable(object value)
    {
        var typeOriginal = value.GetType();
        if (typeOriginal.IsGenericType
            && typeOriginal.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>))
        {
            // generic value, unboxing needed
            return typeOriginal.InvokeMember("GetValueOrDefault",
                System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Public |
                System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Instance |
                System.Reflection.BindingFlags.InvokeMethod,
                null, value, null);
        }
        else
        {
            return value;
        }
    }

    private static void logParameterType(SqlParameter param, StringBuilder sbCommandText)
    {
        switch (param.SqlDbType)
        {
            // variable length
            case SqlDbType.Char:
            case SqlDbType.NChar:
            case SqlDbType.Binary:
                {
                    sbCommandText.Append(param.SqlDbType.ToString().ToUpper());
                    sbCommandText.Append('(');
                    sbCommandText.Append(param.Size);
                    sbCommandText.Append(')');
                }
                break;
            case SqlDbType.VarChar:
            case SqlDbType.NVarChar:
            case SqlDbType.VarBinary:
                {
                    sbCommandText.Append(param.SqlDbType.ToString().ToUpper());
                    sbCommandText.Append("(MAX /* Specified as ");
                    sbCommandText.Append(param.Size);
                    sbCommandText.Append(" */)");
                }
                break;
            // fixed length
            case SqlDbType.Text:
            case SqlDbType.NText:
            case SqlDbType.Bit:
            case SqlDbType.TinyInt:
            case SqlDbType.SmallInt:
            case SqlDbType.Int:
            case SqlDbType.BigInt:
            case SqlDbType.SmallMoney:
            case SqlDbType.Money:
            case SqlDbType.Decimal:
            case SqlDbType.Real:
            case SqlDbType.Float:
            case SqlDbType.Date:
            case SqlDbType.DateTime:
            case SqlDbType.DateTime2:
            case SqlDbType.DateTimeOffset:
            case SqlDbType.UniqueIdentifier:
            case SqlDbType.Image:
                {
                    sbCommandText.Append(param.SqlDbType.ToString().ToUpper());
                }
                break;
            // Unknown
            case SqlDbType.Timestamp:
            default:
                {
                    sbCommandText.Append("/* UNKNOWN DATATYPE: ");
                    sbCommandText.Append(param.SqlDbType.ToString().ToUpper());
                    sbCommandText.Append(" *" + "/ ");
                    sbCommandText.Append(param.SqlDbType.ToString().ToUpper());
                }
                break;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Worked for what I needed it for, thanks –  Fiona Taylor Gorringe Aug 23 '13 at 19:27
    
Thanks for this, it's pretty comprehensive! :-) –  Alastair Maw May 30 at 11:21

If it's only to check how a parameter is formatted in the result query, most DBMS's will allow querying literals from nothing. Thus:

Using cmd As SqlCommand = Connection.CreateCommand
    cmd.CommandText = "SELECT @Value"
    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Value", "myValue")
    Return cmd.ExecuteScalar
End Using

That way you can see if quotes are doubled, etc.

share|improve this answer

I had the same exact question and after reading these responses mistakenly decided it wasn't possible to get the exact resulting query. I was wrong.

Solution: Open Activity Monitor in SQL Server Management Studio, narrow the processes section to the login username, database or application name that your application is using in the connection string. When the call is made to the db refresh Activity Monitor. When you see the process, right click on it and View Details.

Note, this may not be a viable option for a busy db. But you should be able to narrow the result considerably using these steps.

share|improve this answer

This is what I use to output parameter lists for a stored procedure into the debug console:

string query = (from SqlParameter p in sqlCmd.Parameters where p != null where p.Value != null select string.Format("Param: {0} = {1},  ", p.ParameterName, p.Value.ToString())).Aggregate(sqlCmd.CommandText, (current, parameter) => current + parameter);
Debug.WriteLine(query);

This will generate a console outputt simlar to this:

Customer.prGetCustomerDetails: @Offset = 1,  Param: @Fetch = 10,  Param: @CategoryLevel1ID = 3,  Param: @VehicleLineID = 9,  Param: @SalesCode1 = bce,  

I place this code directly below any procedure I wish to debug and is similar to a sql profiler session but in C#.

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