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Go to the Starcraft II website at http://us.starcraft2.com/ and scroll down to the bottom of the page. Notice how it appears like you are looking out of a cockpit.

As you scroll up and down the stars move independently from the cockpit windows creating a layered effect.

How do they get two images to move independently of each other?

Edit: Thanks for the replies below. I did notice they were using a transparent .png image, but I was interested in how they got the "sliding" effect, where the planet comes into view as you scroll down.

I didn't have my dev environment available last night to work through it, but I figured it out now.

It is achieved by having a pair of nested div tags. The background of the parent one is 'fixed' and the background of the child one is set to 'scroll.' The relevant css is below:

<style type="text/css">
    .parent 
    {
        background: url("/Images/Fixed Image.png") no-repeat fixed 50% 100% transparent;
        position: relative;
        height: 800px;
    }
    .parent div
    {
        background: url("/Images/Scrolling Image.png") no-repeat scroll 50% 190px transparent;
        height: 100%;
    }
</style>

And the html:

<div class="parent" >
    <div>
        &nbsp;
    </div>
</div>
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4  
You must construct additional pylons! –  Arnis L. Apr 25 '10 at 19:22

5 Answers 5

The starfield doesn't move, only the cockpit does. What you are seeing on the rest of the page isn't the actual background of the site; the starfield is the background, but it's masked.

Edit: To be specific: The cockpit is a PNG with transparent windows; showing the true background of the page under it.

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this is the footer of the page: http://us.starcraft2.com/images/layout/bg-footer-bridge-t.png as you can see the windows are transparent, so you can see the background of the page.

and the planets are just in the bottom background of the body: http://us.starcraft2.com/images/layout/bg-planet-frontpage.jpg

you can test it your self

html:

<div id="cn">
<div id="hd">
Strarcraft II test header
</div>
<div id="bd">
long list of bllablablba
</div>
<div id="ft">
</div>
</div>

css:

body {
 background: url('http://us.starcraft2.com/images/layout/bg-planet-frontpage.jpg') center bottom no-repeat fixed;
}

div#cn{
 width: 1199px;
 margin: 0 auto;
}

div#ft{
 height: 190px;
background: url('http://us.starcraft2.com/images/layout/bg-footer-bridge-t.png')
}

see a live example here: http://jsfiddle.net/APpXn/

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david,

I gave you a vote because I appreciate how you linked in the image URLs so that we could see them conveniently. However, your code didn't work for me, and I spent a bunch of time trying to get it right. I'm not saying that the html/css below is optimal yet, but it works for me.

Note: this doesn't work in IE6 because of the cockpit.png transparency, but there are workarounds supposedly: http://24ways.org/2007/supersleight-transparent-png-in-ie6

(btw, that is an awesome blog theme!!)

<html>
    <head>
        <style type="text/css">
            html {
                color: White;
                background: #040404 url('http://us.starcraft2.com/images/layout/bg-planet-frontpage.jpg') fixed center 300px no-repeat;
                text-align: center; }
            div#cn {
                width: 1200px;
                height: 800px;
                margin: 0 auto; }
            div#bd {
                height: 320px;
                background-color: #040404; }
            div#cockpit {
                height: 190px;
                background: url('http://us.starcraft2.com/images/layout/bg-footer-bridge-t.png') center top no-repeat; }
            div#bottom {
                height: 240px;
                background-color: #040404;
                padding-top: 40px; }
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="cn">
            <h1 id="hd">
                Strarcraft II test header
            </h1>
            <div id="bd">
                long list of bllablablba<br />
                long list of bllablablba
            </div>
            <div id="ft">
                <div id="cockpit">
                </div>
                <div id="bottom">
                    Courtesy of JohnB
                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

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1  
it totllay works look: jsfiddle.net/APpXn i just made an error whit the URL's i have corrected my post –  meo Apr 25 '10 at 19:18
    
The code in the link you provided does work for me now, thanks. I wanted to post a complete solution that's easy for people to save to a .html file and test for themselves. But that jsFiddle.net is great for that! Thanks for letting me know about that powerful tool! –  JohnB Apr 27 '10 at 19:53

Try playing with the z-index css tag. what it does renders div's in different layers so they might have something like

<div id="layer0"></div>
<div id="everythingElse"><div>

and

#layer0
{
 width: 100%;
 height: 100%;
 background: {The Background};
 z-index: 0;
}

#everythingElse
{
 z-index: 1;
}
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up vote -1 down vote accepted

I figured out how they did it and put the answer in the original post after the "Edit:" mark.

share|improve this answer
    
your solution is not the right one: you wrote: background: url("/Images/Scrolling Image.png") no-repeat scroll 50% 190px transparent; in the parent div. this means your background image is 50% from the left border and 190px from the top. And its not fixed :P maybe it works on your screen. But its a very unproper solution –  meo Apr 25 '10 at 19:32
    
The positioning of the images (i.e. 50% 190px, etc.) were appropriate for the images used to test the solution. Most developers would realize, I hope, that they can't use the same positioning for their images. I provided a sample of how another developer could duplicate the results. –  Jason Apr 26 '10 at 6:02

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