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I was trying to use tis depencency property in my code but it gives me error says that Default value type does not match type of property 'MyProperty'. But short should accept 0 as default value.

If I try to give it a null as default value it works, even if its a non nullabel type. How come this happens..

public short MyProperty
{
   get { return (short)GetValue(MyPropertyProperty); }
   set { SetValue(MyPropertyProperty, value); }
}

Using a DependencyProperty as the backing store for MyProperty. This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...

public static readonly DependencyProperty MyPropertyProperty =
    DependencyProperty.Register(
        "MyProperty",
        typeof(short),
        typeof(Window2),
        new UIPropertyMetadata(0)
    );
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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The problem is that the C# compiler interprets literal values as integers. You can tell it to parse them as longs or ulongs (40L is a long, 40UL is ulong), but there isn't an easy way to declare a short.

Simply casting the literal will work:

public short MyProperty
{
    get { return (short)GetValue(MyPropertyProperty); }
    set { SetValue(MyPropertyProperty, value); }
}

public static readonly DependencyProperty MyPropertyProperty = 
   DependencyProperty.Register(
      "MyProperty", 
      typeof(short),
      typeof(Window2),
      new UIPropertyMetadata((short)0)
   );
share|improve this answer
public short MyProperty
{
    get { return (short)GetValue(MyPropertyProperty); }
    set { SetValue(MyPropertyProperty, value); }
}


// Using a DependencyProperty as the backing store for MyProperty.  This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...
        public static readonly DependencyProperty MyPropertyProperty =
            DependencyProperty.Register("MyProperty", typeof(short), typeof(Window2), new UIPropertyMetadata((short)0));
     }

This seems to work...looks like 0 will be interpreted as int..but why..?

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2  
UIPropertyMetadata constructor gets object parameter, so there is no conversion. C# spec says that integer literals are used to write values of types int, uint, long, and ulong. When you write 0 without cast you get an int. –  majocha Apr 16 '10 at 13:04
2  
Don't answer your own question. Update it. –  Will Apr 16 '10 at 13:14
    
@Will If i update my question then it will no longer be a question..then how will it benifit other people with same probs... –  biju Apr 16 '10 at 13:26
1  
You are allowed to answer your own questions, see FAQ. –  Wallstreet Programmer Apr 16 '10 at 13:49
    
@biju you didn't answer it, you updated your question. "looks like 0 will be interpreted as int, but why?" That implies you're updating your question with more information, not giving everybody an answer. Also, could you please edit this answer and fix your formatting? FFS its all screwed up... –  Will Apr 16 '10 at 14:19

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