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1 = 0b1 -> 1
5 = 0b101 -> 3
10 = 0b1010 -> 4
100 = 0b1100100 -> 7
1000 = 0b1111101000 -> 10
…

How can I get the bit size of an integer, i.e. count the number of bits that are necessary to represent an integer in Python?

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int.bit_length(): Return the number of bits necessary to represent an integer in binary, excluding the sign and leading zeros. docs.python.org/2/library/… –  wap26 Sep 24 '13 at 8:15
    
possible duplicate of fast way of counting bits in python –  endolith Apr 20 at 17:50

6 Answers 6

up vote -3 down vote accepted
import math
def number_of_bits(n):
    return int(math.log(n, 2)) + 1
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4  
Bear in mind that a floating-point based solution will become inaccurate for large n. Depending on how good the system's log function is, the above solution may also fail for powers of 2. 2**48-1 is the smallest integer for which this fails on my system (it gives 49). –  Mark Dickinson Apr 16 '10 at 17:03
10  
To put it simply: this answer is wrong. It just happens to return the right result for some arguments, mostly small ones. –  Gilles Feb 3 '12 at 19:16

In python 2.7+ there is a int.bit_length() method:

>>> a = 100
>>> a.bit_length()
7
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>>> len(bin(1000))-2
10
>>> len(bin(100))-2
7
>>> len(bin(10))-2
4

Note: will not work for negative numbers, may be need to substract 3 instead of 2

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+1: Very clever –  S.Lott Apr 16 '10 at 15:37
1  
This will not work with negative numbers though (while it also won't fail on it, opposed to the log-versions) –  KillianDS Apr 16 '10 at 15:40
    
You are right @KillianDS, I added a note –  YOU Apr 16 '10 at 15:43
1  
If you care about negative numbers, do len(bin(abs(n)))-2 –  endolith Dec 11 '13 at 20:59

If your Python version has it (≥2.7 for Python 2, ≥3.1 for Python 3), use the bit_length method from the standard library.

Otherwise, len(bin(n))-2 as suggested by YOU is fast (because it's implemented in Python). Note that this returns 1 for 0.

Otherwise, a simple method is to repeatedly divide by 2 (which is a straightforward bit shifting), and count how long it takes to reach 0.

defs bit_length(n): # return the bit size of a nonnegative integer
    bits = 0
    while n >> bits: bits += 1
    return bits

It is significantly faster (at least for large numbers — a quick benchmarks says more than 10 times faster for 1000 digits) to shift by whole words at a time, then go back and work on the bits of the last word.

defs bit_length(n): # return the bit size of a nonnegative integer
    if n == 0: return 0
    bits = -32
    m = 0
    while n:
        m = n
        n >>= 32; bits += 32
    while m: m >>= 1; bits += 1
    return bits

In my quick benchmark, len(bin(n)) came significantly faster than even the word-sized chunk version. Although bin(n) builds a string that's discarded immediately, it comes out on top due to having an inner loop that's compiled to machine code. (math.log is even faster, but that's not important since it's wrong.)

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This solution takes advantage of .bit_length() if available, and falls back to len(hex(a)) for older versions of Python. It has the advantage over bin that it creates a smaller temporary string, so it uses less memory.

Please note that it returns 1 for 0, but that's easy to change.

_HEX_BIT_COUNT_MAP = {
    '0': 0, '1': 1, '2': 2, '3': 2, '4': 3, '5': 3, '6': 3, '7': 3}

def bit_count(a):
  """Returns the number of bits needed to represent abs(a). Returns 1 for 0."""
  if not isinstance(a, (int, long)):
    raise TypeError
  if not a:
    return 1
  # Example: hex(-0xabc) == '-0xabc'. 'L' is appended for longs.
  s = hex(a)
  d = len(s)
  if s[-1] == 'L':
    d -= 1
  if s[0] == '-':
    d -= 4
    c = s[3]
  else:
    d -= 3
    c = s[2]
  return _HEX_BIT_COUNT_MAP.get(c, 4) + (d << 2)


# Use int.bit_length and long.bit_length introduced in Python 2.7 and 3.x.
if getattr(0, 'bit_length', None):
  __doc = bit_count.__doc__
  def bit_count(a):
    return a.bit_length() or 1
  bit_count.__doc__ = __doc

assert bit_count(0) == 1
assert bit_count(1) == 1
assert bit_count(2) == 2
assert bit_count(3) == 2
assert bit_count(63) == 6
assert bit_count(64) == 7
assert bit_count(75) == 7
assert bit_count(2047) == 11
assert bit_count(2048) == 12
assert bit_count(-4007) == 12
assert bit_count(4095) == 12
assert bit_count(4096) == 13
assert bit_count(1 << 1203) == 1204
assert bit_count(-(1 << 1203)) == 1204
assert bit_count(1 << 1204) == 1205
assert bit_count(1 << 1205) == 1206
assert bit_count(1 << 1206) == 1207
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instead of checking if it has bit_length, you should just try to use it and then except AttributeError? –  endolith Dec 11 '13 at 21:20
    
@endolith: Would it be a significant improvement of this code? In what way? –  pts Dec 11 '13 at 21:22
    
well it's more efficient if you're expecting bit_length to be available –  endolith Dec 11 '13 at 21:32
    
@endolith: Are you sure it's more efficient? (Have you benchmarked it?) Is the difference significant in this case? –  pts Dec 11 '13 at 21:46
def bitcounter(n):
    return math.floor(math.log(n,2)) + 1

EDIT fixed so that it works with 1

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2  
This is off by one for powers of two. –  Ants Aasma Apr 16 '10 at 15:29
1  
@Ants Aasma: Are you sure about that? It looks fine to me, assuming that math.log(n, 2) gives a perfectly correct result. –  Mark Dickinson Apr 16 '10 at 18:11
1  
@MarkDickinson: math.log(n, 2) does not give a perfectly correct result. math.log(2**29, 2) = 29.000000000000004, for instance. –  endolith Dec 9 '13 at 18:15
1  
@endolith: Yep; I'm scratching my head trying to figure out what on earth I was thinking when I wrote that comment. FWIW, there's math.log2 for Python 3, which does give exact results for floats that are exact powers of 2. –  Mark Dickinson Dec 9 '13 at 18:47
1  
@endolith: Though interestingly, on my machine, I get log(2**n, 2) >= n for all non-negative n, so that math.floor(math.log(n, 2)) + 1 still gives the correct result for powers of 2. Though not, of course, for all n; n = 2**48 - 1 seems to be the smallest value for which it fails. –  Mark Dickinson Dec 9 '13 at 18:53

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