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<hyperbole>Whoever answers this question can claim credit for solving the world's most challenging SQL query, according to yours truly.</hyperbole>

Working with 3 tables: users, badges, awards.

Relationships: user has many awards; award belongs to user; badge has many awards; award belongs to badge. So badge_id and user_id are foreign keys in the awards table.

The business logic at work here is that every time a user wins a badge, he/she receives it as an award. A user can be awarded the same badge multiple times. Each badge is assigned a designated point value (point_value is a field in the badges table). For example, BadgeA can be worth 500 Points, BadgeB 1000 Points, and so on. As further example, let's say UserX won BadgeA 10 times and BadgeB 5 times. BadgeA being worth 500 Points, and BadgeB being worth 1000 Points, UserX has accumulated a total of 10,000 Points ((10 x 500) + (5 x 1000)).

The end game here is to return a list of top 50 users who have accumulated the most badge points.

Can you do it?

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2  
should go for a bounty? –  Sarfraz Apr 17 '10 at 11:55
    
lol...yes, if stackoverflow allows me to transfer the bounty to you –  keruilin Apr 17 '10 at 11:56
    
why do you want to do this as a SQL Query? –  Marek Apr 17 '10 at 11:58
2  
Is this homework? If so, please tag as such. –  Bob Jarvis Apr 17 '10 at 12:24
1  
@keruilin: I know that it's supposed to be funny to self-assess your current problem as the "hardest in the world". But actually it isn't, neither the hardest problem in the world nor funny. ;) Please give it an appropriate title that at least Google can find this thread more easily. –  Tomalak Apr 17 '10 at 12:34
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

My sample tables are:

user:

+-------+--------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| Field | Type         | Null | Key | Default | Extra |
+-------+--------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| id    | int(11)      | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
| name  | varchar(200) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
+-------+--------------+------+-----+---------+-------+

badge:

+-------+---------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| Field | Type    | Null | Key | Default | Extra |
+-------+---------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| id    | int(11) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
| score | int(11) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
+-------+---------+------+-----+---------+-------+

award:

+----------+---------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| Field    | Type    | Null | Key | Default | Extra |
+----------+---------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| id       | int(11) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
| user_id  | int(11) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
| badge_id | int(11) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
+----------+---------+------+-----+---------+-------+

Thus the query is:

SELECT user.name, SUM(score)
  FROM badge JOIN award ON badge.id = award.badge_id
       JOIN user ON user.id = award.user_id
 GROUP BY user.name
 ORDER BY 2
 LIMIT 50
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1  
I think the asker is interested in both users and the score. –  Hamish Grubijan Apr 17 '10 at 12:16
    
Right. fixed :) –  MoshiBin Apr 17 '10 at 12:16
    
what does the order by 2 do? –  keruilin Apr 17 '10 at 14:01
1  
'ORDER BY 2' means order by the 2nd field we've selected. It's especially helpful when one of your SELECT items is a long series of actions on one or more fields. Oh, and don't forget to ORDER BY 2 DESC, because I'm guessing the default is ASCending. –  MoshiBin Apr 17 '10 at 14:59
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No, that's not the worlds most challenging query. Something simple like this should do it:

select u.id, u.name, sum(b.points) as Points
from users u
inner join awards a on a.user_id = u.id
inner join badges b on b.id = a.badge_id
group by u.id, u.name
order by 2 desc
limit 50
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