Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

What would be recommended as an authentication solution for a Software-as-a-service product?

Specifically, my product would have clients that would typically have low information technology skills, potentially not even having an IT department within their organization. I would still like to have my application authenticate against their internal directory service (eDirectory, Active Directory, etc.). I don't want them, however, to have to open/forward ports (for instance, opening up port 636 so I can do LDAPS binds directly to their directory service).

One idea I had was to have an application installed on a server within their organization's network that would backconnect to my service. This would be a persistant socket. When I need to authenticate a user, I send the credentials via the socket (encrypted) - the application then performs a bind/whatever to authenticate against the directory service and replies with OK/FAIL.

What would you suggest? My goal here is to essentially have the client install an application within their network, with very little configuration or intervention.

share|improve this question
    
Interesting. I always thought of installed applications as one-time payment products, whereas SaaS was handled remotely to the point where there was no client install. –  Matchu Apr 17 '10 at 13:15
    
The application is web-based and hosted remotely. However, I have a requirement that authentication be integrated with whatever directory service they may have. –  josh Apr 17 '10 at 21:41

2 Answers 2

This vendor, Stormpath, offers a service providing exactly what you are asking for: user authentication, user account management, with hookups to your customers’ on-premise directories (if need be, as is your case).

share|improve this answer

I think in your case, it'd be necessary to drop an agent on to their network which performs the authentication locally, then creates a signed token which "proves" to your SaaS app that it has done so; this can be passed on by the browser in a query string or form post (for example).

The agent might be an IIS-installable web app which can just authenticate the user and then direct them on to your servers in the cloud. This should not be a major hassle to install, but will create tech support issues. In particular, you need to get this component right first time, as users are not going to update it on a regular basis.

Making it work securely may be interesting.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.