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I'm calling the static ctor of a class using this code:

Type type;
System.Runtime.CompilerServices.RuntimeHelpers.RunClassConstructor(type.TypeHandle);

Can this cause the cctor to be run twice?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

No, it runs the static constructor only once, even if you call RunClassConstructor twice. Just try ;)

using System.Runtime.CompilerServices;
...

void Main()
{
    RuntimeHelpers.RunClassConstructor(typeof(Foo).TypeHandle);
    RuntimeHelpers.RunClassConstructor(typeof(Foo).TypeHandle);
    Foo.Bar();
}

class Foo
{
    static Foo()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Foo");
    }

    public static void Bar()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Bar");
    }
}

This code prints :

Foo
Bar

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Is that true even if I call RunClassConstructor, then use the class for the first time (which would usually cause the cctor to run)? And is that guaranteed? The MSDN does not provide any information. –  mafu Apr 17 '10 at 14:09
1  
Ah, ok, so it works in practice. Now if only some official paper would state that this is not going to be changed in the future... –  mafu Apr 17 '10 at 14:14
    
BTW, I tested the code above with .NET 4.0, and there has been a few changes to the way types are initialized in .NET 4.0 (see Jon Skeet's blog post : msmvps.com/blogs/jon_skeet/archive/2010/01/26/…). So you might want to try it in 3.5 –  Thomas Levesque Apr 17 '10 at 14:23
1  
Yes, but I'd really like an official paper to make sure it's not going to be changed randomly. That's the only concern left. –  mafu Apr 22 '10 at 12:57
    
IMHO, it's unlikely that they will ever make such a breaking change... –  Thomas Levesque Apr 22 '10 at 21:27

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