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In my iPhone app, I take a picture with the camera, then I want to resize it to 290*390 pixels. I was using this method to resize the image :

UIImage *newImage = [image _imageScaledToSize:CGSizeMake(290, 390)
                         interpolationQuality:1];    

It works perfectly, but it's an undocumented function, so I can't use it anymore with iPhone OS4.

So... what is the simplest way to resize an UIImage ?

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10 Answers 10

up vote 395 down vote accepted

The simplest way is to set the frame of your UIImageView and set the contentMode to one of the resizing options.

Or you can use this utility method, if you actually need to resize an image:

+ (UIImage *)imageWithImage:(UIImage *)image scaledToSize:(CGSize)newSize {
    //UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(newSize);
    // In next line, pass 0.0 to use the current device's pixel scaling factor (and thus account for Retina resolution).
    // Pass 1.0 to force exact pixel size.
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(newSize, NO, 0.0);
    [image drawInRect:CGRectMake(0, 0, newSize.width, newSize.height)];
    UIImage *newImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();    
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
    return newImage;
}

Example usage:

#import "MYUtil.h"
…
UIImage *myIcon = [MYUtil imageWithImage:myUIImageInstance scaledToSize:CGSizeMake(20, 20)];
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11  
I would NOT retain the result here. newImage will be autoreleased already, and it should up to the method that called this to retain it or not. This approach is just begging for a memory bug since init is not part of the method name. I would expect a method named like this to return an autoreleased object. –  Alex Wayne May 23 '10 at 0:01
18  
As of iOS 4.0, the UIGraphics* functions are all thread-safe. –  BJ Homer Feb 18 '11 at 21:00
4  
Ah, yes, replace the first line with: UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(newSize, NO, 0.0); This tells the function to us the current device's pixel scaling factor (and thus accounts for Retina). –  elsurudo Apr 3 '12 at 10:30
1  
@Paul Lynch: Keep in mind that this change breaks the original post's mission: How to resize an image to some exact pixel size (as opposed to point size). –  Nikolai Ruhe Apr 4 '12 at 19:08
3  
For those struggling due to the limitation @NikolaiRuhe pointed out, you can force it to an exact pixel size by passing 1.0 instead of 0.0 in the call to UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions –  Danny Jan 8 '13 at 0:35

Trevor Howard has some UIImage categories that handle resize quite nicely. If nothing else you can use the code as examples.

Note: As of iOS 5.1, this answer maybe invalid. See comment below.

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+1 for the link. This blog post by Trevor Howard should be bookmarked by everybody. –  bddckr Apr 17 '10 at 15:54
2  
I needed to resize some images too, and I first tried out Trevor's additions to UIImage, but got some weird bugs on PNG's (something about the alpha channel). The accepted answer to this question worked out nicely though. –  Sorig Nov 2 '10 at 22:11
    
That is by far the easiest way... +1 –  jbat100 Nov 24 '11 at 15:43
1  
This is no longer valid (at least with iOS5.1 –  Jann Mar 22 '12 at 17:54
1  
@sanmai using any of these resizing methods the images loosing its sharp ness. is there any way to achieve the sharpness –  vamsi575kg Oct 1 '13 at 5:43

I've also seen this done as well (which I use on UIButtons for Normal and Selected state since buttons don't resize to fit). Credit goes to whoever the original author was.

First make an empty .h and .m file called UIImageResizing.h and UIImageResizing.m

// Put this in UIImageResizing.h
@interface UIImage (Resize)
- (UIImage*)scaleToSize:(CGSize)size;
@end

// Put this in UIImageResizing.m
@implementation UIImage (Resize)

- (UIImage*)scaleToSize:(CGSize)size {
UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(size);

CGContextRef context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();
CGContextTranslateCTM(context, 0.0, size.height);
CGContextScaleCTM(context, 1.0, -1.0);

CGContextDrawImage(context, CGRectMake(0.0f, 0.0f, size.width, size.height), self.CGImage);

UIImage* scaledImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();

UIGraphicsEndImageContext();

return scaledImage;
}

@end

Include that .h file in whatever .m file you're going to use the function in and then call it like this:

UIImage* image = [UIImage imageName:@"largeImage.png"];
UIImage* smallImage = [image scaleToSize:CGSizeMake(100.0f,100.0f)];
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1  
Shouldn't the Category name be the same in both .h and .m files? Currently one is (Resize) and the other is (Resizing) –  George Sealy Nov 15 '10 at 22:52
    
good catch, thanks –  iWasRobbed Nov 16 '10 at 3:15

This improvement to Paul's code will give you a sharp high res image on an iPhone with a retina display. Otherwise when scaling down it's blurry.

+ (UIImage *)imageWithImage:(UIImage *)image scaledToSize:(CGSize)newSize {
if ([[UIScreen mainScreen] respondsToSelector:@selector(scale)]) {
    if ([[UIScreen mainScreen] scale] == 2.0) {
        UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(newSize, YES, 2.0);
    } else {
        UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(newSize);
    }
} else {
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(newSize);
}
[image drawInRect:CGRectMake(0, 0, newSize.width, newSize.height)];
UIImage *newImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();    
UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
return newImage;
}
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5  
Just FYI, the changes you have made are unnecessary, since supplying a value of 0.0 for the scale in UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions will automatically use the main screen's scale (as of iOS 3.2). –  Andrew R. Apr 23 '12 at 3:36
1  
Even though the commenter is right, this helped me track down why the third party category I was using was blurring the image. Thanks. –  P1X3L5 Apr 6 '13 at 2:14

If you just want an image smaller and don't care about exact size:

+ (UIImage *)imageWithImage:(UIImage *)image scaledToScale:(CGFloat)scale
{
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(self.size, YES, scale);
    CGContextRef context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();
    CGContextSetInterpolationQuality(context, kCGInterpolationHigh);
    [self drawInRect:CGRectMake(0, 0, self.size.width, self.size.height)];
    UIImage *newImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
    return newImage;
}

Setting scale to 0.25f will give you a 816 by 612 image from a 8MP camera.

Here's a category UIImage+Scale for those who needs one.

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1  
this is the right answer. there is no need to fiddle around with image dimensions when you can easily scale it –  Sam Budda Feb 17 at 13:25

Here is a simple way:

    UIImage * image = [UIImage imageNamed:@"image"];
    CGSize sacleSize = CGSizeMake(10, 10);
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(sacleSize, NO, 0.0);
    [image drawInRect:CGRectMake(0, 0, sacleSize.width, sacleSize.height)];
    UIImage * resizedImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();

resizedImage is a new image.

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You probably meant scaleSize and not sacleSize :) –  sdsykes Sep 5 at 7:05

If you want to make a thumbnail of a UIImage (with proportional resizing or maybe some cropping involved), check out UIImage+Resize category that allows you to use concise, ImageMagick-like syntax:

UIImage* squareImage       = [image resizedImageByMagick: @"320x320#"];
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This is a nice API –  n13 Mar 19 at 11:31

Here's the Swift version of Paul Lynch's answer

func imageWithImage(image:UIImage, scaledToSize newSize:CGSize) -> UIImage{
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(newSize, false, 0.0);
    image.drawInRect(CGRectMake(0, 0, newSize.width, newSize.height))
    var newImage:UIImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext()
    return newImage
}
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Here's a modification of the category written by iWasRobbed above. It keeps the aspect ratio of the original image instead of distorting it.

- (UIImage*)scaleToSizeKeepAspect:(CGSize)size {
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(size);

    CGFloat ws = size.width/self.size.width;
    CGFloat hs = size.height/self.size.height;

    if (ws > hs) {
        ws = hs/ws;
        hs = 1.0;
    } else {
        hs = ws/hs;
        ws = 1.0;
    }

    CGContextRef context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();
    CGContextTranslateCTM(context, 0.0, size.height);
    CGContextScaleCTM(context, 1.0, -1.0);

    CGContextDrawImage(context, CGRectMake(size.width/2-(size.width*ws)/2,
        size.height/2-(size.height*hs)/2, size.width*ws,
        size.height*hs), self.CGImage);

    UIImage* scaledImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();

    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();

    return scaledImage;
}
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I found a category for UIImage in Apple's own examples which does the same trick. Here's the link: https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/samplecode/sc2273/Listings/AirDropSample_UIImage_Resize_m.html.

You'll just have to change the call:

UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(newSize, YES, 2.0);

in imageWithImage:scaledToSize:inRect: with:

UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(newSize, NO, 2.0);

In order to consider the alpha channel in the image.

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