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It seems most of the work is in business applications like inventory, sales, banks, medical, human resources, government, insurance, document processing, file archiving etc. Would you agree?

From my point of view business applications seem to occupy over 90% of the job offerings(because no one wants to work on those?).

Furthermore, each big app I have worked on, the application itself sucked, like being paid in compensation for putting up with a bad code base and product.

Seeing how those business apps seem to occupy most of the market, should one accept that this is just the sad reality of this business?

Do you get to develop on projects that are more dynamic than those?

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closed as not constructive by Oded, Aaronaught, George Stocker, bernie, ChrisF Apr 17 '10 at 19:22

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They occupy more than 90% of the job offerings because those companies make up more than 90% of the industry. If the applications suck, then make them better, that's your job. –  Aaronaught Apr 17 '10 at 19:15
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As noted SF writer Theodore Sturgeon observed "Ninety percent of everything is c**p." –  APC Apr 17 '10 at 19:26
    
@ Aaronaught:You get to choose what features you develop on? I don't. Maybe I see my job as providing a set of skills to create thing rather than just being given some cash to compensate for working on a product no one likes. –  GenEric35 Apr 17 '10 at 19:27
    
closed? I thought I've put this for wiki, no? –  GenEric35 Apr 17 '10 at 19:29

2 Answers 2

From my point of view business applications seem to occupy over 90% of the job offerings(because no one wants to work on those?).

This is merely because the "business" world has a need for custom applications. Developing these applications is a very necessary task.

Furthermore, each big app I have worked on, the application itself sucked, like being paid in compensation for putting up with a bad code base and product.

This is more a statement about where you have worked, not the industry in general. There are very well written business applications, and very poorly written ones.

It seems most of the work is in business is applications like inventory, sales, banks, medical, human resources, government, insurance, document processing, file archiving etc.

This list covers most of the economy... You can't expect to make money writing software that nobody needs or uses, unless you find a useful niche market...

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A statement based from where I worked, and the goal was to see if this was how other developers felt about it. If those cover most of the economy, how is it that millions of users use their computers for entertainment(not just gaming, but also media of all kinds, social networking etc), those don't only revolve around personal computers but also servers. –  GenEric35 Apr 17 '10 at 19:34

Software development is as interesting, fun, exciting and fulfilling as you make it. This has almost no relationship to the problem domain.

The problem domains you mention are highly profitable, they demand huge quantities of programming skill but demand outstrips supply, and hence they get a poor quality of programming skill. They have to make do with whoever they can attract, just because there is so much work to do.

This is why most code is messy. This is an opportunity for you, not a problem.

And if you think you'll find it more exciting to write code for the music industry, the aerospace industry, etc. then this means you probably find those things more interesting than software itself; me, I find software problems interesting in abstract, regardless of the problem domain.

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just because I like pizza doesn't mean I have to work at pizza, but if one has his product installed at work, and finds it pathetic to use, something is wrong there, and fixing it sucks, cleaning up is usually for janitors and maids –  GenEric35 Apr 17 '10 at 19:39

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