Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for a fast, clean, pythonic way to divide a list into exactly n nearly-equal partitions.

partition([1,2,3,4,5],5)->[[1],[2],[3],[4],[5]]
partition([1,2,3,4,5],2)->[[1,2],[3,4,5]] (or [[1,2,3],[4,5]])
partition([1,2,3,4,5],3)->[[1,2],[3,4],[5]] (there are other ways to slice this one too)

There are several answers in here http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1335392/iteration-over-list-slices that run very close to what I want, except they are focused on the size of the list, and I care about the number of the lists (some of them also pad with None). These are trivially converted, obviously, but I'm looking for a best practice.

Similarly, people have pointed out great solutions here http://stackoverflow.com/questions/312443/how-do-you-split-a-list-into-evenly-sized-chunks-in-python for a very similar problem, but I'm more interested in the number of partitions than the specific size, as long as it's within 1. Again, this is trivially convertible, but I'm looking for a best practice.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
def partition(lst, n):
    division = len(lst) / float(n)
    return [ lst[int(round(division * i)): int(round(division * (i + 1)))] for i in xrange(n) ]

>>> partition([1,2,3,4,5],5)
[[1], [2], [3], [4], [5]]
>>> partition([1,2,3,4,5],2)
[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5]]
>>> partition([1,2,3,4,5],3)
[[1, 2], [3, 4], [5]]
>>> partition(range(105), 10)
[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10], [11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20], [21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31], [32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41], [42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52], [53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62], [63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73], [74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83], [84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94], [95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104]]
share|improve this answer
2  
That doesn't work for non-trivial examples. For partition(range(105), 10), the last sublist will have only 6 elements. –  Daniel Stutzbach Apr 17 '10 at 20:57
1  
How would you split that list? –  João Silva Apr 17 '10 at 21:00
2  
@JG: 5 sublists of 10 items and 5 sublists of 11 items. –  Daniel Stutzbach Apr 17 '10 at 21:07
1  
@Daniel: Fair enough, although that isn't very clear in the original question. It is "fixed" now. –  João Silva Apr 17 '10 at 21:12
1  
@JG: I believe the “exactly n nearly equal” was meant to be “exactly n of nearly equal length”; the “as long as it's within 1” also is a strong hint, even if vague and unclear. –  tzot Apr 18 '10 at 0:54

Below is one way.

def partition(lst, n):
    increment = len(lst) / float(n)
    last = 0
    i = 1
    results = []
    while last < len(lst):
        idx = int(round(increment * i))
        results.append(lst[last:idx])
        last = idx
        i += 1
    return results

If len(lst) cannot be evenly divided by n, this version will distribute the extra items at roughly equal intervals. For example:

>>> print [len(x) for x in partition(range(105), 10)]
[11, 10, 11, 10, 11, 10, 11, 10, 11, 10]

The code could be simpler if you don't mind all of the 11s being at the beginning or the end.

share|improve this answer
1  
The use of floating-point could result in machine-dependent results: when increment*i is (mathematically) exactly halfway between two integers, the rounding could go either way depending on what numerical errors have been introduced. How about using something like idx = len(lst)*i//n instead? Or perhaps idx = (len(lst)*i + n//2)//n to get results similar to the current code. –  Mark Dickinson Apr 17 '10 at 21:40
    
FYI this is the well-known Bresenham algorithm. –  smci Jul 3 '11 at 8:16

Here's a version that's similar to Daniel's: it divides as evenly as possible, but puts all the larger partitions at the start:

def partition(lst, n):
    q, r = divmod(len(lst), n)
    indices = [q*i + min(i, r) for i in xrange(n+1)]
    return [lst[indices[i]:indices[i+1]] for i in xrange(n)]

It also avoids the use of float arithmetic, since that always makes me uncomfortable. :)

Edit: an example, just to show the contrast with Daniel Stutzbach's solution

>>> print [len(x) for x in partition(range(105), 10)]
[11, 11, 11, 11, 11, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10]
share|improve this answer

Just a different take, that only works if [[1,3,5],[2,4]] is an acceptable partition, in your example.

def partition ( lst, n ):
    return [ lst[i::n] for i in xrange(n) ]

This satisfies the example mentioned in @Daniel Stutzbach's example:

partition(range(105),10)
# [[0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100],
# [1, 11, 21, 31, 41, 51, 61, 71, 81, 91, 101],
# [2, 12, 22, 32, 42, 52, 62, 72, 82, 92, 102],
# [3, 13, 23, 33, 43, 53, 63, 73, 83, 93, 103],
# [4, 14, 24, 34, 44, 54, 64, 74, 84, 94, 104],
# [5, 15, 25, 35, 45, 55, 65, 75, 85, 95],
# [6, 16, 26, 36, 46, 56, 66, 76, 86, 96],
# [7, 17, 27, 37, 47, 57, 67, 77, 87, 97],
# [8, 18, 28, 38, 48, 58, 68, 78, 88, 98],
# [9, 19, 29, 39, 49, 59, 69, 79, 89, 99]]
share|improve this answer
2  
This is a wonderfully pythonic solution –  flatline May 3 '13 at 18:48
    
I feel like there must be some clever way to get the original, desired input, but zip( *partition(range(105),10) ) doesn't work because zip truncates... Still, very nice. –  Walter Nissen Nov 15 '13 at 3:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.