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I am trying to get my head round some basic erlang functionality and I could do with some comments on the following.

I have the following erlang code that takes a list of tuples and returns a list minus an element if a key is found:

delete(Key, Database) ->
    remove(Database, Key, []).

remove([], Key, Acc) ->
    Acc;
remove([H|T], Key, Acc) ->
    if
        element(1, H) /= Key ->             
            [H| remove(T, Key, Acc)];
        true  -> 
            remove(T, Key, Acc)
    end.

Is this a good way of doing this?

The if statement seems incorrect.

Also is my use of the accumulator Acc making this tail recursive?

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If you want to know if something is tail recursive, think about whether anything needs the return value of the call before the function can return. In this case, the cons is waiting for the result, so no, it's not tail recursive. –  Dustin Apr 17 '10 at 22:14
    
This is a rephrasing of the question I answered for you here: stackoverflow.com/questions/2658631/tail-recursion-in-erlang/… –  Jeremy Wall Apr 18 '10 at 6:15
    
@Jeremy It is not a complete rephrasing as I am looking for guidance on the if statement but I take the point and will not post on the subject again. –  dagda1 Apr 18 '10 at 10:03
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, your usage of Acc doesn't make it tail recursive. Your branch of if returns [H| remove(T, Key, Acc)] which is not tail call and this branch would be used most of time. To be more precise your usage of Acc is useless because it would be [] whole time, you don't change its value at all. Correct code should look like.

delete(Key, Database) ->
    remove(Database, Key, []).

remove([], Key, Acc) ->
    lists:reverse(Acc);
remove([H|T], Key, Acc) ->
    if
        element(1, H) /= Key ->             
            remove(T, Key, [H|Acc]);
        true  -> 
            remove(T, Key, Acc)
    end.

But if your list members are always pairs I would prefer direct pattern match:

delete(Key, Database) ->
    remove(Database, Key, []).

remove([], Key, Acc) ->
    lists:reverse(Acc);
remove([{Key, _}|T], Key, Acc) ->
    remove(T, Key, Acc);
% if it should delete only first occurrence then lists:reverse(Acc, T);
remove([H|T], Key, Acc) ->
    remove(T, Key, [H|Acc]).

But I think this is example where can apply Myth: Tail-recursive functions are MUCH faster than recursive functions so I would use much simpler recursive version:

delete(Key, []) -> [];
delete(Key, [{Key, _}|T]) -> delete(Key, T);
% if it should delete only first occurrence then just T;
delete(Key, [H|T]) -> [H | delete(Key, T)].
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As mentioned, there is a standard module function that already does this (proplists:delete). Shouldn't need to say more, but...

I'd tend to keep the original method name (delete), but have a local version including the accumulator as parameter. The context makes me think the order of the tuples in the "database" doesn't matter, so that a lists:reverse isn't necessary.

-module(foo).
-export([delete/2]).

delete(Key, Database) ->
    delete(Key, Database, []).

delete(_Key, [], Acc) ->
    Acc;
delete(Key, [{Key, _} | T], Acc) ->
    delete(Key, T, Acc);
delete(Key, [Entry={_, _} | T], Acc) ->
    delete(Key, T, [Entry | Acc]).

A couple things here:

  • tail-recursive; in general I think it is safer to stick with tail-recursion -- while there are optimizations for body recursive calls, you'd really need to do some performance measurement with realistic (for your application) data to make a comparison
  • note that we're not accepting any old list here; the Entry pattern match in delete/3 helps ensure this (depending on what this is for, you may or may not want this)
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1  
Interesting point that there is not important order in "database" so tail recursive version without lists:reverse should be fastest solution. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Apr 19 '10 at 19:18
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