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I'm trying to reverse the order of bits in C (homework question, subject: bitwise operators). I found this solution, but I'm a little confused by the hex values (?) used -- 0x01 and 0x80.

  unsigned char reverse(unsigned char c) {
     int shift;
     unsigned char result = 0;

     for (shift = 0; shift < CHAR_BITS; shift++) {
        if (c & (0x01 << shift))
            result |= (0x80 >> shift);
     }
     return result;
  }

The book I'm working out of hasn't discussed these kinds of values, so I'm not really sure what to make of them. Can somebody shed some light on this solution? Thank you!

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One oddity in the code...CHAR_BITS is not the standard define - it is CHAR_BIT, defined in <limits.h>. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 17 '10 at 23:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

0x01 is the least significant bit set, hence the decimal value is 1.

0x80 is the most significant bit of an 8-bit byte set. If it is stored in a signed char (on a machine that uses 2's-complement notation - as most machines you are likely to come across will), it is the most negative value (decimal -128); in an unsigned char, is is decimal +128.

The other pattern that becomes second nature is 0xFF with all bits set; this is decimal -1 for signed characters and 255 for unsigned characters. And, of course, there's 0x00 or zero with no bits set.

What the loop does on the first cycle is check if the LSB (least significant bit) is set, and if it is, sets the MSB (most significant bit) in the result. On the next cycle, it checks the next to LSB and sets the next to MSB, etc.

| MSB |     |     |     |     |     |     | LSB |
|  1  |  0  |  1  |  1  |  0  |  0  |  1  |  1  |   Input
|  1  |  1  |  0  |  0  |  1  |  1  |  0  |  1  |   Output
|  1  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  0  |   0x80
|  0  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  1  |   0x01
|  0  |  1  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  0  |   (0x80 >> 1)
|  0  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  1  |  0  |   (0x01 << 1)
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Careful. The negative values are only valid for for twos-complement representation of integers. In ones-complement or sign-magnitude the bit-patterns have different meanings. C doesn't mandate the use of twos-complement. –  Steve Emmerson Apr 17 '10 at 23:52
    
@Steve: true enough...I've adjusted the answer accordingly. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 17 '10 at 23:54
    
Wow. Thank you for the explanation -- the illustration really locked it in for me. –  ajax81 Apr 18 '10 at 2:18

Each hex digit represents 4bits, so

  • 0x01 is just a long way of writing 1.
  • 0x80 is a short way of writing in binary [1000][0000], or 128.

The solution is using bitwise operators to test and set values.

The expression:

if (a & b) { ... }

executes '...' if the same bit is 1 in both 'a' and 'b'.

The expression

c |= b

sets the bits in 'c' to 1, if they are 1 in 'b'.

The loop moves the test & set bit down the line.

Good luck!

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0x01 means 1—a one in the ones place—and 0x80 means 128—an 8 in the sixteens place. Those numbers refer to the lowest bit and highest bit in an eight-bit number, respectively. Shifting them gives masks for the individual bits in the byte.

Edit: In a hexadecimal number, the digits go in powers of sixteen, not powers of ten. So the first digit from the right is the ones place (0x1 = 1), the second digit is the sixteens place (0x10 = 16), the third digit is the two-hundred-fifty-sixes place (0x100 = 256), and so on.

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Sixteens place? Do you want to fix that or explain that? –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 17 '10 at 23:38
2  
If you look at each nybble as a digit in the base-16 representation of the number, then 8 is in the sixteens place. But I doubt this will relieve the OPs confusion. –  GregS Apr 17 '10 at 23:41

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