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My Makefile is:

OBJS = b.o c.o a.o
FLAGS = -Wall -Werror
CC = gcc

test: $(OBJS)
    $(CC) $(FLAGS) $(OBJS) -o test
b.o: b.c b.h
    $(CC) $(FLAGS) -c b.c
a.o: a.c b.h c.h
    $(CC) $(FLAGS) -c a.c
c.o: c.c c.h
    $(CC) $(FLAGS) -c c.c
clean:
    rm a
    rm *.o
all: test

If I do make then make again, it always rebuilds 'test'. Why does it do this?

Even if i do: make a.o it rebuilds... Im on linux if that helps.

In windows if I change 'test' by 'test.exe' and '-o test' by '-o test.exe', it works fine. So I guess that for some reason 'make' in my linux cant check the datestamps of my files in the directory.

I FIXED IT! The .c were created in Windows. I opened all .c and .h in vi, and without doing nothing save changes, and all worked. I think that the datestamp thing was fixed doing this.

share|improve this question
    
Can you work up a simpler test case? (Such as fewer files, perhaps a hello-world-type program, so you can include everything in the question.) You've changed how the test rule works in a recent edit, and I suspect there are other significant differences from what's been posted. – Roger Pate Apr 18 '10 at 0:43
    
I think the problem its linux. If in that makefile I change 'test' by 'text.exe' and in its rule '-o text.exe', it works fine. – fsdfa Apr 18 '10 at 0:47
    
Just as an aside, you probably shouldn't call your executable 'test'. Most UNIXes have a real 'test' program. – paxdiablo Apr 18 '10 at 0:51
    
@pax But it won't matter if he never puts his executable somewhere in PATH. – Roger Pate Apr 18 '10 at 0:59
1  
@Roger, that's a good point. It's just that I've been bitten before when . isn't on my path (and it shouldn't be if you want to be secure). Then, when I run test instead of ./test, I get rather unexpected results. Nowadays I always call my test programs tst (or x if I'm feeling pathologically efficient). – paxdiablo Apr 18 '10 at 5:12

Your first rule is:

test: $(OBJS)

That means if a file named 'test' doesn't exist, the rule should run and create it. Since 'test' never exists (that rule doesn't actually create a file named 'test'), it runs every time. You should change 'test' to 'a', the actual output of that rule

For future reference, if a rule doesn't actually create the thing on the left-hand side, you should mark it with:

.PHONY: test
share|improve this answer
    
Im sorry, it was my typo.. its that way in the Makefile – fsdfa Apr 18 '10 at 0:31

As a last resort you can run Make in debug mode (make -d) and comb through the output. Before trying that, I suggest you add a line to the "test" rule to see if there are any prerequisites that Make thinks require the rebuilding of test (and use some automatic variables in the compile command, as a good practice).

test: $(OBJS)
    @echo prereqs that are newer than test: $?
    $(CC) $(FLAGS) $^ -o $@
share|improve this answer

You need to specify that test is a phony target:

OBJS = b.o c.o a.o
CFLAGS = -Wall -Werror
CC = gcc

.PHONY: all test clean
# 'all' and 'clean' are also phony

all: test
test: a

a: $(OBJS)
    $(CC) $(CFLAGS) $(OBJS) -o a

b.o: b.c b.h
a.o: a.c b.h c.h
c.o: c.c c.h

clean:
    rm a
    rm *.o

I've placed all first so it is the default target (which is common), removed the commands for compiling (make already has those built-in), and changed FLAGS to CFLAGS (which is the common name for C compiler flags and used by make's built-in rules).

share|improve this answer
    
It continues rebuilding all. – fsdfa Apr 18 '10 at 0:38

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