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Which is better and what is the difference?

SELECT * FROM TABLE_A A WHERE A.ID IN (SELECT B.ID FROM TABLE_B B)

or

SELECT * FROM TABLE_A A, TABLE_B B WHERE A.ID = B.ID
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will the second query work ? –  Mahesh Velaga Apr 18 '10 at 0:51
1  
@Mahesh Velaga: Yeah, from a, b is old style for from a cross join b. For each row in a, select all rows in b. So from a, b where a.id = b.id is the equivalent of from a inner join b on a.id = b.id –  Andomar Apr 18 '10 at 1:02
    
@Andomar: Thanks! till what point is this older one compatible ? –  Mahesh Velaga Apr 18 '10 at 1:11
    
@Mahesh Velaga: As far as I know all databases support it and there are no plans to phase it out –  Andomar Apr 18 '10 at 21:17

5 Answers 5

I upvoted @Aaronaught's answer, but I have some comments:

  • Both the comma-style join syntax and the JOIN syntax are ANSI. The first is SQL-89, and the second is SQL-92. The SQL-89 syntax is still part of the standard, to support backward compatibility.

  • Can you give an example of an RDBMS that supports the SQL-92 syntax but not the SQL-89? I don't think there are any, so "not as consistently supported" may not be accurate.

  • You can also omit the join condition using JOIN syntax, and create a Cartesian product. Example: SELECT ... FROM A JOIN B is valid (correction: this is true only in some brands that implement the standard syntax loosely, such as MySQL).

    But in any case I agree this is easier to spot when you use SQL-92 syntax. If you use SQL-89 syntax you may end up with a long WHERE clause and it's too easy to miss one of your join conditions.

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SELECT ... FROM A JOIN B is not valid. JOIN, without a qualify defaults to an inner join, and requires an ON clause. To get a Cartesian product you must say, SELECT ... FROM A CROSS JOIN B (There may be some platforms that do allow JOIN without ON, but not standard.) –  Shannon Severance Apr 18 '10 at 3:36
    
@Shannon: Yes, you're right. JOIN must have an ON or USING clause -- unless you use the NATURAL or UNION join modifier. –  Bill Karwin Apr 18 '10 at 4:04
    
Bill: I seem to remember back in SQL Server 2000, you would get an error ("Joined tables cannot be specified in a query containing outer join operators") if you tried to outer-join views using the SQL-89 syntax. It was a bizarre and cryptic error that was fixed by switching to the SQL-92 join. Even though SQL-89 is still a standard, we all know how consistently some standards tend to be implemented across platforms. :) Good points regardless. –  Aaronaught Apr 18 '10 at 7:37

There are at least three differences between query X:

SELECT * FROM TABLE_A A WHERE A.ID IN (SELECT B.ID FROM TABLE_B B)

and Y:

SELECT * FROM TABLE_A A, TABLE_B B WHERE A.ID = B.ID

1) As Michas said, the set of columns will be different, where query Y will return the columns from tables A & B, but query X only returns the columns from table A. If you explicitly name which columns you want back, query X can only include columns from table A, but query Y would include columns from table B.

2) The number of rows may be different. If table B has more than on ID matching an ID from table A, then more rows will be returned with Query Y than X.

create table TABLE_A (ID int, st VARCHAR(10))
create table TABLE_B (ID int, st VARCHAR(10))

insert into TABLE_A values (1, 'A-a')

insert into TABLE_B values (1, 'B-a')
insert into TABLE_B values (1, 'B-b')

SELECT * FROM  TABLE_A A WHERE A.ID IN (SELECT B.ID FROM TABLE_B B)

ID          st
----------- ----------
1           A-a
(1 row(s) affected) 

SELECT * FROM TABLE_A A, TABLE_B B WHERE A.ID = B.ID  

ID          st         ID          st
----------- ---------- ----------- ----------
1           A-a        1           B-a
1           A-a        1           B-b
(2 row(s) affected)

3) The execution plans will probably be different, since the queries are asking the database for different results. Inner joins used to run faster than in or exists and may still run faster in some cases. But since the results can be different you need to make sure that the data supports the transformation from a in or exists to a join.

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+1, but re 3) depending on the relationship between a.id and b.id you might be right or might not be; in case of one-to-zero-or-one or in case of many-to-zero-or-one relationships the query will most probably produce the same plans (queries are asking for the same result) in case of one-to-many or many-to-many it will not. So it depends. –  Unreason Apr 19 '10 at 8:20

These two queries return different results. You select only columns from TABLE_A in the first.

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The difference is that the first does a subquery which can be slower in some databases. And the second does a join, combining both tables in the same query.

Generally, the second would be faster if the database won't optimize it since with a subquery the database would have to keep the results of the subquery in memory.

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The "best" way is to use the standard ANSI JOIN syntax:

SELECT (columns)
FROM TABLE_A a
INNER JOIN TABLE_B b
    ON b.ID = a.ID

The first WHERE IN version will often result in the same execution plan, but on certain platforms it can be slower - it's not always consistent. The IN query (which is equivalent to EXISTS) is also going to become progressively more cumbersome to write and maintain as you start to add more tables or create more complex join conditions - it's not as flexible as an actual JOIN.

The second, comma-separated syntax is not as consistently supported as JOIN. It does work on most SQL DBMSes, but it's not the "preferred" version because if you leave out the WHERE clause then you end up with a cross-product. Whereas if you forget to write in the JOIN condition, you'll just end up with a syntax error. JOIN tends to be preferred because of this safety net.

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+1 for specifying columns rather than '*' (better performance), and I wish I could give you another +1 for explicitly specifying JOINs... –  CJM Apr 18 '10 at 1:07
    
+1 but see my comments in a separate answer. –  Bill Karwin Apr 18 '10 at 1:38
    
It is a good answer, but the statement that comma-separated syntax (which is a core part of standard SQL and such features will probably never be removed from SQL standard) is not widely supported is simply untrue. I would even say that it is more widely supported then CROSS JOIN syntax. Just edit the answer. Also considering the question it might be good to emphasize that the queries do not necessarily return the same result (as stated in stackoverflow.com/questions/2660666/sql-select-queries/…) –  Unreason Apr 19 '10 at 8:25

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