Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for a good sorted list for java. Googling around give me some hints about using TreeSet/TreeMap. But these components is lack of one thing: random access to an element in the set. For example, I want to access nth element in the sorted set, but with TreeSet, I must iterate over other n-1 elements before I can get there. It would be a waste since I would have upto several thousands elements in my Set.

Basically, I'm looking for some thing similar to a sorted list in .NET, with ability to add element fast, remove element fast, and have random access to any element in the list.

Has this kind of sorted list implemented somewhere? Thanks.

Edited

My interest in SortedList grows out of this problems: I need to maintains a list of many thousands object (and can grow up to many hundred of thousands). These objects will be persisted to database. I want to randomly select few dozens of element from the whole list. So, I tried to maintain a separated on-memory list that contains the primary keys (Long numbers) of all objects. I need to add/remove keys from the list when object is added / removed from database. I'm using an ArrayList right now but I'm afraid ArrayList would not suit it when the number of records grows. (Imagine you have to iterate over several hundred thousands of elements every time an object is removed from database). Back to the time when I did .NET programming, then I would use a sorted List (List is a .NET class that once Sorted property set to true, will maintain order of its element, and provide binary search that help remove/insert element very quick). I'm hoping that I can find some thing similar from java BCL but unluckily, I didn't find a good match.

share|improve this question
5  
TreeSet gives you log(n) lookup, not linear. –  Stefan Kendall Apr 18 '10 at 4:13
    
Do you have any performance metrics which dictate that log(n) is too slow? You're almost certainly pre-optimizing. "Several thousands of elements" sorts in nanoseconds, and maintaining a treeset takes little to no time. log_10(thousands) = 5. –  Stefan Kendall Apr 18 '10 at 4:17
4  
-1 for pre-optimizing. –  Stefan Kendall Apr 18 '10 at 4:20
2  
@Stefan: TreeSet gives you a log(n) contains test (where n is the size), but no way to access the i-th element easily (where i is an arbitrary index). –  Christian Semrau Apr 18 '10 at 11:02
1  
No, it wouldn't! That's the point, if you cared to read what I said. It would take 20 * log_2(4000) = 20*~12 = 240 iterations. This is NEGLIGIBLE on modern hardware! –  Stefan Kendall Apr 18 '10 at 14:33

8 Answers 8

up vote 28 down vote accepted

It seems that you want a list structure with very fast removal and random access by index (not by key) times. An ArrayList gives you the latter and a HashMap or TreeMap give you the former.

There is one structure in Apache Commons Collections that may be what you are looking for, the TreeList. The JavaDoc specifies that it is optimized for quick insertion and removal at any index in the list. If you also need generics though, this will not help you.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for an implementation that should actually outperform a collection in the Java API. –  Stefan Kendall Apr 18 '10 at 17:12
    
Thanks. This is exactly what's I'm looking for. –  Phương Nguyễn Apr 19 '10 at 8:59
    
I think LinkedList wont suits here since it has to iterate to reach an element with particular index. But add/remove is faster. –  Kanagavelu Sugumar Oct 15 '13 at 17:45
    
@Sugumar TreeList is not a LinkedList nor does it have behavior like a linked list (see the link which provides performance comparison between the two) so I don't understand your comment. You are correct though, LinkedList is not appropriate for what the question was asking for. –  Kevin Brock Oct 15 '13 at 20:40

This is the SortedList implementation I am using. Maybe this helps with your problem:

import java.util.Collection;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.Comparator;
import java.util.LinkedList;
/**
 * This class is a List implementation which sorts the elements using the
 * comparator specified when constructing a new instance.
 * 
 * @param <T>
 */
public class SortedList<T> extends LinkedList<T> {
    /**
     * Needed for serialization.
     */
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
    /**
     * Comparator used to sort the list.
     */
    private Comparator<? super T> comparator = null;
    /**
     * Construct a new instance with the list elements sorted in their
     * {@link java.lang.Comparable} natural ordering.
     */
    public SortedList() {
    }
    /**
     * Construct a new instance using the given comparator.
     * 
     * @param comparator
     */
    public SortedList(Comparator<? super T> comparator) {
        this.comparator = comparator;
    }
    /**
     * Add a new entry to the list. The insertion point is calculated using the
     * comparator.
     * 
     * @param paramT
     */
    @Override
    public boolean add(T paramT) {
        int insertionPoint = Collections.binarySearch(this, paramT, comparator);
        super.add((insertionPoint > -1) ? insertionPoint : (-insertionPoint) - 1, paramT);
        return true;
    }
    /**
     * Adds all elements in the specified collection to the list. Each element
     * will be inserted at the correct position to keep the list sorted.
     * 
     * @param paramCollection
     */
    @Override
    public boolean addAll(Collection<? extends T> paramCollection) {
        boolean result = false;
        if (paramCollection.size() > 4) {
            result = super.addAll(paramCollection);
            Collections.sort(this, comparator);
        }
        else {
            for (T paramT:paramCollection) {
                result |= add(paramT);
            }
        }
        return result;
    }
    /**
     * Check, if this list contains the given Element. This is faster than the
     * {@link #contains(Object)} method, since it is based on binary search.
     * 
     * @param paramT
     * @return <code>true</code>, if the element is contained in this list;
     * <code>false</code>, otherwise.
     */
    public boolean containsElement(T paramT) {
        return (Collections.binarySearch(this, paramT, comparator) > -1);
    }
}

This solution is very flexible and uses existing Java functions:

  • Completely based on generics
  • Uses java.util.Collections for finding and inserting list elements
  • Option to use a custom Comparator for list sorting

Note that this sorted list is not synchronized since it inherits from java.util.LinkedList. Use Collections.synchronizedList if you need this (refer to the Java documentation for java.util.LinkedList for details).

share|improve this answer
    
What makes this a good implementation, and superior to the other answers offered? Please add this explanation to your answer, rather than just pasting in code. –  Erick Robertson Sep 28 '12 at 14:29
1  
Why are you extending LinkedList? Binary search will have O(n) as this is not random access collection. –  Anatoliy Apr 24 '13 at 15:39
    
I guess addAll method can be improved a bit - now it has O(N^2) complexity, but if you could insert all the elements in bulk unsorted and then sort it again -> via Collectoins.sort() you could have a better complexity, like -> O(N logN + 2N). BTW - I guess LinkedList is a better alternative over ArrayList as it grows will less cost. –  Anatoliy Apr 25 '13 at 8:27
    
@Anatoliy Took a while to get back to you - I like your comment. I modified the addAll method to use super.addAll like you suggested. I added an if statement for being able to choose which ever method is faster - addAll or multiple add calls. The value 4 is just a guess, though - no tests performed. –  Konrad Holl Jul 5 '13 at 12:24

Phuong:

Sorting 40,000 random numbers:

0.022 seconds

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Random;


public class test
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        List<Integer> nums = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        Random rand = new Random();
        for( int i = 0; i < 40000; i++ )
        {
            nums.add( rand.nextInt(Integer.MAX_VALUE) );
        }

        long start = System.nanoTime();
        Collections.sort(nums);
        long end = System.nanoTime();

        System.out.println((end-start)/1e9);
    }
}   

Since you rarely need sorting, as per your problem statement, this is probably more efficient than it needs to be.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hi Stefan: Thanks for the bench mark. But, actually, what I really want at a sorted list is fast remove. I don't even mind sorting my list because I'm randomly selecting elements from it anyway. I'm interested in sorted list because sorted list would give great performance on removing/inserting elements. Now I'm working with several thousands, but I'd expect my data to grow to several hundred thousands. Without a true sorted list, then I don't think I can get along well with that. –  Phương Nguyễn Apr 18 '10 at 15:13
    
@PhươngNguyễn I think LinkedList will give great performance on removing/inserting than a SortedList. –  Kanagavelu Sugumar Oct 15 '13 at 17:44

Depending on how you're using the list, it may be worth it to use a TreeSet and then use the toArray() method at the end. I had a case where I needed a sorted list, and I found that the TreeSet + toArray() was much faster than adding to an array and merge sorting at the end.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Long: Thanks. Your solution is pretty good. Except that with a high change set, then toArray() will be called many times. For example, if my set grows from 4000-4100 then I need to call toArray 100 times, each time is an iteration over 4000+ items, result in 400000 extra iterations. I'm looking for a solution that could eliminate that extra iterations as well. But well, like Stefan Kendall tried to communicate, it would be pre-optimization. –  Phương Nguyễn Apr 18 '10 at 14:33
    
You're definitely right, you don't want to do this every time you add something. What I meant is that if you know you'll always be adding in batches, the TreeSet + toArray() might work. –  Brendan Long Apr 18 '10 at 20:37

Generally you can't have constant time look up and log time deletions/insertions, but if you're happy with log time look ups then you can use a SortedList.

Not sure if you'll trust my coding but I recently wrote a SortedList implementation in Java, which you can download from http://www.scottlogic.co.uk/2010/12/sorted_lists_in_java/. This implementation allows you to look up the i-th element of the list in log time.

share|improve this answer
    
This implementation is now stable and improved. –  Mark Rhodes Jul 7 '11 at 8:45

GlazedLists has a very, very good sorted list implementation

share|improve this answer
    
SortedList is log(n) lookup, much like TreeSet. –  Stefan Kendall Apr 18 '10 at 4:14
    
Unlike TreeSet, SortedList allows random access to any given index, and seems therefore better suited. I don't know about any sorted list structure that allows O(log(n)) insertion and O(1) index access. –  Christian Semrau Apr 18 '10 at 10:57
    
Hmm, it looks like a Desktop GUI component to me. Is there any condensed library on that stuff? –  Phương Nguyễn Apr 18 '10 at 14:41
    
GlazedLists is most certainly not a GUI component. Give it a try. As for a condensed library (presumably something that has only the sorting functionality?) no. There's a lot of work that goes into this sort of thing, and it wouldn't make sense to do it for just one type of list. The whole GL approach is insanely elegant. –  Kevin Day Apr 20 '10 at 3:48
    
Hah - and now I look at the javadocs of TreeList (from Commons), and it looks like they have done the work and kept it in a single class. GL is still a fantastic option for live and declaritive lists - I highly recommend it. –  Kevin Day Apr 20 '10 at 3:56

What about using a HashMap? Insertion, deletion, and retrieval are all O(1) operations. If you wanted to sort everything, you could grab a List of the values in the Map and run them through an O(n log n) sorting algorithm.

edit

A quick search has found LinkedHashMap, which maintains insertion order of your keys. It's not an exact solution, but it's pretty close.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, I didn't see how to have random access with LinkedHashMap. –  Phương Nguyễn Apr 18 '10 at 16:11

SortedList decorator from Java Happy Libraries can be used to decorate TreeList from Apache Collections. That would produce a new list which performance is compareable to TreeSet. https://sourceforge.net/p/happy-guys/wiki/Sorted%20List/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.