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Say you have a linked list structure in Java. It's made up of Nodes:

class Node {
    Node next;
    // some user data
}

and each Node points to the next node, except for the last Node, which has null for next. Say there is a possibility that the list can contain a loop - i.e. the final Node, instead of having a null, has a reference to one of the nodes in the list which came before it.

What's the best way of writing

boolean hasLoop(Node first)

which would return true if the given Node is the first of a list with a loop, and false otherwise? How could you write so that it takes a constant amount of space and a reasonable amount of time?

Here's a picture of what a list with a loop looks like:

alt text

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28  
Wow..I would love to work for this employer finite amount of space and a reasonable amount of time? :) –  codaddict Apr 18 '10 at 17:10
7  
@SLaks - the loop doesn't necessary loop back to the first node. It can loop back to halfway. –  jjujuma Apr 18 '10 at 17:12
41  
The answers below are worth reading, but interview questions like this are terrible. You either know the answer (i.e. you've seen a variant on Floyd's algorithm) or you don't, and it doesn't do anything to test your reasoning or design ability. –  GaryF Apr 18 '10 at 17:30
3  
To be fair, most of "knowing algorithms" is like this -- unless you're doing research-level things! –  Larry Apr 18 '10 at 17:37
6  
@GaryF And yet it would be revealing to know what they would do when they did not know the answer. E.g. what steps would they take, who would they work with, what would they do to overcome a lack of algorithmec knowledge? –  Chris Knight Apr 18 '10 at 21:04

18 Answers 18

up vote 250 down vote accepted

You can make use of Floyd's cycle-finding algorithm, also know as tortoise and hare algorithm.

The idea is to have two references to the list and move them at different speeds. Move one forward by 1 node and the other by 2 nodes.

  • If the linked list has a loop they will definitely meet.
  • Else either of the two references(or their next) will become null.

Java function implementing the algorithm:

boolean hasLoop(Node first) {

    if(first == null) // list does not exist..so no loop either.
        return false;

    Node slow, fast; // create two references.

    slow = fast = first; // make both refer to the start of the list.

    while(true) {

        slow = slow.next;          // 1 hop.

        if(fast.next != null)
            fast = fast.next.next; // 2 hops.
        else
            return false;          // next node null => no loop.

        if(slow == null || fast == null) // if either hits null..no loop.
            return false;

        if(slow == fast) // if the two ever meet...we must have a loop.
            return true;
    }
}
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10  
Also need to do a null-check on fast.next before calling next again: if(fast.next!=null)fast=fast.next.next; –  cmptrgeekken Apr 18 '10 at 17:27
12  
you should check not only (slow==fast) but: (slow==fast || slow.next==fast) to prevent jumping the fast over the slow –  Oleg Razgulyaev Apr 18 '10 at 17:55
7  
i was wrong: fast can't jump over slow, because to jump over slow on next step fast should has the same pos as slow :) –  Oleg Razgulyaev Apr 19 '10 at 7:21
11  
You should really cite your references. This algorithm was invented by Robert Floyd in the '60s, It's known as Floyd's cycle-finding algorithm, aka. The Tortoise and Hare Algorithm. –  joshperry May 18 '10 at 16:30
2  
This code won't work for odd length lists. If fast.next == null then the element fast refers to is never advanced. After some time, the slow reference will catch up and falsely report a loop. –  Tim Bender Jul 20 '10 at 4:34

An alternative solution to the Turtle and Rabbit, not quite as nice, as I temporarily change the list:

The idea is to walk the list, and reverse it as you go. Then, when you first reach a node that has already been visited, its next pointer will point "backwards", causing the iteration to proceed towards first again, where it terminates.

Node prev = null;
Node cur = first;
while (cur != null) {
    Node next = cur.next;
    cur.next = prev;
    prev = cur;
    cur = next;
}
boolean hasCycle = prev == first && first != null && first.next != null;

// reconstruct the list
cur = prev;
prev = null;
while (cur != null) {
    Node next = cur.next;
    cur.next = prev;
    prev = cur;
    cur = next;
}

return hasCycle;

Test code:

static void assertSameOrder(Node[] nodes) {
    for (int i = 0; i < nodes.length - 1; i++) {
        assert nodes[i].next == nodes[i + 1];
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Node[] nodes = new Node[100];
    for (int i = 0; i < nodes.length; i++) {
        nodes[i] = new Node();
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < nodes.length - 1; i++) {
        nodes[i].next = nodes[i + 1];
    }
    Node first = nodes[0];
    Node max = nodes[nodes.length - 1];

    max.next = null;
    assert !hasCycle(first);
    assertSameOrder(nodes);
    max.next = first;
    assert hasCycle(first);
    assertSameOrder(nodes);
    max.next = max;
    assert hasCycle(first);
    assertSameOrder(nodes);
    max.next = nodes[50];
    assert hasCycle(first);
    assertSameOrder(nodes);
}
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2  
+1 great idea.. –  Oleg Razgulyaev Apr 20 '10 at 21:15
1  
+1 faster than turtle and rabbit and more cache friendly –  Peter G. Jul 21 '10 at 17:01

Here's a refinement of the Fast/Slow solution, which correctly handles odd length lists and improves clarity.

boolean hasLoop(Node first) {
    Node slow = first;
    Node fast = first;

    while(fast != null && fast.next != null) {
        slow = slow.next;          // 1 hop
        fast = fast.next.next;     // 2 hops 

        if(slow == fast)  // fast caught up to slow, so there is a loop
            return true;
    }
    return false;  // fast reached null, so the list terminates
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice and succinct. This code can be optimized by checking if slow == fast || (fast.next != null && slow = fast.next); :) –  arachnode.net Feb 26 '13 at 3:16
    
Good one! Short and sweet! –  Vikram Nov 15 '13 at 21:42
    
@arachnode.net That's not an optimization. If slow == fast.next then slow will equal fast on the very next iteration; it only saves one iteration at most at the expense of an additional test for every iteration. –  Jason C Mar 5 at 23:59
    
@ana01 slow cannot become null before fast as it is following the same path of references (unless you have concurrent modification of the list in which case all bets are off). –  Dave L. Oct 15 at 14:57

Tortoise and hare

Take a look at Pollard's rho algorithm. It's not quite the same problem, but maybe you'll understand the logic from it, and apply it for linked lists.

(if you're lazy, you can just check out cycle detection -- check the part about the tortoise and hare.)

This only requires linear time, and 2 extra pointers.

In Java:

boolean hasLoop( Node first ) {
    if ( first == null ) return false;

    Node turtle = first;
    Node hare = first;

    while ( hare.next != null && hare.next.next != null ) {
         turtle = turtle.next;
         hare = hare.next.next;

         if ( turtle == hare ) return true;
    }

    return false;
}

(Most of the solution do not check for both next and next.next for nulls. Also, since the turtle is always behind, you don't have to check it for null -- the hare did that already.)

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Better than Floyd's algorithm

Richard Brent described an alternative cycle detection algorithm, which is pretty much like the hare and the tortoise [Floyd's cycle] except that, the slow node here doesn't move, but is later "teleported" to the position of the fast node at fixed intervals.

The description is available here : http://www.siafoo.net/algorithm/11 Brent claims that his algorithm is 24 to 36 % faster than the Floyd's cycle algorithm. O(n) time complexity, O(1) space complexity.

public static boolean hasLoop(Node root){
    if(root == null) return false;

    Node slow = root, fast = root;
    int taken = 0, limit = 2;

    while(slow.next != null && fast.next != null){
        fast = fast.next;
        taken++;
        if(slow == fast) return true;

        if(taken == limit){
            taken = 0;
            limit <<= 1;    // equivalent to limit *= 2;
            slow = fast;    // teleporting the turtle (to the hare's position) 
        }
    }
    return false;
}
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This answer is awesome! –  valin077 Jun 10 at 19:00
1  
Really liked your answer, included it on my blog - k2code.blogspot.in/2010/04/…. –  kinshuk4 Oct 16 at 18:48

The user unicornaddict has a nice algorithm above, but unfortunately it contains a bug for non-loopy lists of odd length >= 3. The problem is that fast can get "stuck" just before the end of the list, slow catches up to it, and a loop is (wrongly) detected.

Here's the corrected algorithm.

static boolean hasLoop(Node first) {

    if(first == null) // list does not exist..so no loop either.
        return false;

    Node slow, fast; // create two references.

    slow = fast = first; // make both refer to the start of the list.

    while(true) {
        slow = slow.next;          // 1 hop.
        if(fast.next == null)
            fast = null;
        else
            fast = fast.next.next; // 2 hops.

        if(fast == null) // if fast hits null..no loop.
            return false;

        if(slow == fast) // if the two ever meet...we must have a loop.
            return true;
    }
}
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The following may not be the best method--it is O(n^2). However, it should serve to get the job done (eventually).

count_of_elements_so_far = 0;
for (each element in linked list)
{
    search for current element in first <count_of_elements_so_far>
    if found, then you have a loop
    else,count_of_elements_so_far++;
}
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Algorithm

public static boolean hasCycle (LinkedList<Node> list)
{
    ArrayList<Node> visited = new ArrayList<Node>();

    for (Node n : list)
    {
        visited.add(n);

        if (visited.contains(n.next))
        {
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}

Complexity

Time ~ O(n)
Space ~ O(2n)
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public boolean hasLoop(Node start){   
   TreeSet<Node> set = new TreeSet<Node>();
   Node lookingAt = start;

   while (lookingAt.peek() != null){
       lookingAt = lookingAt.next;

       if (set.contains(lookingAt){
           return false;
        } else {
        set.put(lookingAt);
        }

        return true;
}   
// Inside our Node class:        
public Node peek(){
   return this.next;
}

Forgive me my ignorance (I'm still fairly new to Java and programming), but why wouldn't the above work?

I guess this doesn't solve the constant space issue... but it does at least get there in a reasonable time, correct? It will only take the space of the linked list plus the space of a set with n elements (where n is the number of elements in the linked list, or the number of elements until it reaches a loop). And for time, worst-case analysis, I think, would suggest O(nlog(n)). SortedSet look-ups for contains() are log(n) (check the javadoc, but I'm pretty sure TreeSet's underlying structure is TreeMap, whose in turn is a red-black tree), and in the worst case (no loops, or loop at very end), it will have to do n look-ups.

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Yes a solution with some kind of Set works fine, but requires space proportional to the size of the list. –  jjujuma Apr 21 '10 at 11:51

If we're allowed to embed the class Node, I would solve the problem as I've implemented it below. hasLoop() runs in O(n) time, and takes only the space of counter. Does this seem like an appropriate solution? Or is there a way to do it without embedding Node? (Obviously, in a real implementation there would be more methods, like RemoveNode(Node n), etc.)

public class LinkedNodeList {
    Node first;
    Int count;

    LinkedNodeList(){
        first = null;
        count = 0;
    }

    LinkedNodeList(Node n){
        if (n.next != null){
            throw new error("must start with single node!");
        } else {
            first = n;
            count = 1;
        }
    }

    public void addNode(Node n){
        Node lookingAt = first;

        while(lookingAt.next != null){
            lookingAt = lookingAt.next;
        }

        lookingAt.next = n;
        count++;
    }

    public boolean hasLoop(){

        int counter = 0;
        Node lookingAt = first;

        while(lookingAt.next != null){
            counter++;
            if (count < counter){
                return false;
            } else {
               lookingAt = lookingAt.next;
            }
        }

        return true;

    }



    private class Node{
        Node next;
        ....
    }

}
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You can also look the Nivasch's algorithm here: Nivasch's algorithm.

Or you can check Gabriel Nivasch's personal homepage at The stack algorithm for cycle detection which also contains a C implementation of the algorithm.

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+1 for mentioning other, non-standard algorithms. Although the link of the first does not work… –  Paul Wagland Nov 2 '10 at 14:08

You could even do it in constant O(1) time (although it would not be very fast or efficient): There is a limited amount of nodes your computer's memory can hold, say N records. If you traverse more than N records, then you have a loop.

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I cannot see any way of making this take a fixed amount of time or space, both will increase with the size of the list.

I would make use of an IdentityHashMap (given that there is not yet an IdentityHashSet) and store each Node into the map. Before a node is stored you would call containsKey on it. If the Node already exists you have a cycle.

ItentityHashMap uses == instead of .equals so that you are checking where the object is in memory rather than if it has the same contents.

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1  
It's certainly impossible for it to take a fixed amount of time, as there could be a loop at the very end of the list, so the entire list must be visited. However, the Fast/Slow algorithm demonstrates a solution using a fixed amount of memory. –  Dave L. Jul 21 '10 at 16:32

i think it can be done in one of the simplest way by O(n) complexity.

as you traverse the list starting from head, create a sorted list of adresses. when you insert a new adress, just check it is already there in the sorted list. the sorting is of O(logN) complexity only :-)

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public boolean isCircular() {

    if (head == null)
        return false;

    Node temp1 = head;
    Node temp2 = head;

    try {
        while (temp2.next != null) {

            temp2 = temp2.next.next.next;
            temp1 = temp1.next;

            if (temp1 == temp2 || temp1 == temp2.next) 
                return true;    

        }
    } catch (NullPointerException ex) {
        return false;

    }

    return false;

}
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I might be terribly late and new to handle this thread. But still..

Why cant the address of the node and the "next" node pointed be stored in a table

If we could tabulate this way

node present: (present node addr) (next node address)

node 1: addr1: 0x100 addr2: 0x200 ( no present node address till this point had 0x200)
node 2: addr2: 0x200 addr3: 0x300 ( no present node address till this point had 0x300)
node 3: addr3: 0x300 addr4: 0x400 ( no present node address till this point had 0x400)
node 4: addr4: 0x400 addr5: 0x500 ( no present node address till this point had 0x500)
node 5: addr5: 0x500 addr6: 0x600 ( no present node address till this point had 0x600)
node 6: addr6: 0x600 addr4: 0x400 ( ONE present node address till this point had 0x400)

Hence there is a cycle formed.

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Loop can be identified by storing nodes in a Map. And before putting the node; check if node already exists. If node already exists in the map then it means that Linked List has loop.

I have given a working Java code on my blog.

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This does not meet the constant amount of space restriction given in the question! –  dedek Jun 26 at 11:36
    
agree it has space overhead; it's another approach to solve this problem. The obvious approach is tortoise and harse algorithm. –  rai.skumar Jun 26 at 11:50

Ok i understand having two pointers and moving one slow and one fast... and if they meet there is a cycle... But what is wrong with this solution? I don't to move two pointers... i can just assume if i come back to where i started then there is a cycle...

detectCycle(Node start) {
    val current = start.next
    while (current != null) {
        if (current.equals(start)) return true
        else
            current = current.next
    }
}

Perhaps the tortoise and hair can detect explicitly which nodes are causing the cycle where as my algorithm just says if there is a cycle but does not detect the nodes causing it.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with this solution (and sorry this is way after the fact that you posted), is that you only check if it hits the same starting point. This would never check a loop that occurs outside of your start node. Think a list like this A -> B -> C -> D -> E, then E points back to C. If you started at A, current would never equal start (it would never loop back to A). It would just loop between C -> D -> E -> back to C -> D -> E, etc. Also you never return false outside of your while loop :P –  MrHappyAsthma Sep 28 at 19:58

protected by Travis J Jul 20 '13 at 23:28

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