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  • Does vector::operator= change vector capacity? If so, how?
  • Does vector's copy constructor copy capacity?

I looked through documentation but could not find a specific answer. Is it implementation dependent?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

All you're guaranteed is that:

  1. The vector has enough capacity to store its elements. (Obviously.)
  2. The vector won't get a new capacity until it's current capacity is full.*

So how much extra or little an implementation wants to put is up to the implementation. I think most will make capacity match size, when copying, but it cannot lower capacity. (Because of number 2 above; reallocating while there's enough room is not allowed.)

* Mostly. See Charles' comments below.

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1  
Actually, you're not quite guaranteed (2). In current C++ you are guaranteed that no reallocation occurs after a call to reserve until an insertion would take the size beyond the value of the previous call to reserve. Before a call to reserve, or after a call to reserve when the size is between the value of the previous call to reserve and the capacity the implementation is allowed to reallocate early if it so chooses. Whether this is desirable, I don't know. –  Charles Bailey Apr 18 '10 at 18:08
1  
In C++0x the requirement has changed and after a call to reserve no reallocation will happen until an insertion moves the size of the container beyond the capacity (note, not the size previously passed to reserve any more). This means that you can reserve, query the capacity and know with certainty exactly when the next reallocation will happen. –  Charles Bailey Apr 18 '10 at 18:10
2  
"...without requiring reallocation..." but that's my point. The standard doesn't mandate that a vector shall not reallocate even if it has spare capacity and doesn't strictly need to. It wouldn't break the interface contract to do this unless the client had actually called reserve. –  Charles Bailey Apr 18 '10 at 18:35
1  
Someone was confused by what I was pointing out, so explicitly: 23.2.4.3/1 specifies when reallocation occurs, if reallocation does not occur under that (or another) requirement, then it must not occur, per 23.1/11. –  Roger Pate Apr 18 '10 at 19:32
1  
@Charles: You were right that DR329 itself was off the mark (which is why I've deleted that comment), but I respectfully say I believe it's the reverse and you're reading more into it. 23.1/11 says invalidation (which reallocation requires) must not occur unless specified, so where is it specified that op= reallocates if the new size is not more than the old capacity? –  Roger Pate Apr 18 '10 at 20:01

Does vector::operator= change vector capacity? If so, how?

It might change capacity. This happens only if the previous capacity was too small to hold the new size. If so, the new capacity is at least equal to the new size, but could be a larger value.

Does copy constructor copy capacity?

Per Table 65 Container requirements in C++03, X u (a); and X u = a; are both equivalent to X u; u = a;. This makes the copy ctor identical to the op= case, after default constructing the vector.

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As i wrote before, the copy need not - and usually DOES NOT - retain the capacity of the original vector.

gcc version 4.1.1

$ cat vt.cpp
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
int main() {
   std::vector<int> v1;
   v1.reserve(50000);
   std::vector<int> v2 = v1;
   std::cout << v1.capacity() << std::endl;
   std::cout << v2.capacity() << std::endl;
   return 0;
}

$ g++ vt.cpp -o vt && ./vt
50000
0

$ cat v2.cpp
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
int main() {
   std::vector<int> v1;
   v1.reserve(50000);
   std::vector<int> v2;
   v2 = v1;
   std::cout << v1.capacity() << std::endl;
   std::cout << v2.capacity() << std::endl;
   return 0;
}

$ g++ v2.cpp -o v2 && ./v2
50000
0
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That's not using operator=. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 18 '10 at 18:01
1  
@vectros: If you had std::vector<int> v2; v2.reserve(v1.size()*2); v2 = v1;, then it is not allowed to shrink it's capacity while copying the contents of v1. –  GManNickG Apr 18 '10 at 18:05
    
You're both wrong. –  vectros Apr 18 '10 at 18:09
    
as for not using operator=() - i realize it was using the copy ctor. it's not relevant. it behaves the same with the copy ctor as it does with operator=(). –  vectros Apr 18 '10 at 18:11
1  
they wrote v2.reserve(size_t) , rather than v1.reserve –  Anycorn Apr 18 '10 at 18:13

It is implementation dependent. Most in practice shrink the vectors to the minimum size.

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that seems wrong, because it would invalidate previous reserve () –  Anycorn Apr 18 '10 at 17:33
1  
@aaa the standard just says "It is guaranteed that no reallocation takes place during insertions that happen after a call to reserve() until the time when an insertion would make the size of the vector greater than the size specified in the most recent call to reserve()" . Assignment of another vector isn't an insertion, so a reallocation may happen during an assignment, which however must rellocate to the same, or to a higher capacity than what you specified previously (which makes sense, since the vector assigned from may contain more elements). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 18 '10 at 17:36
    
the capacity of the vector being copied remains the same. the vector capacity of the copy is implementation dependent, and its capacity is usually shrunk to the minimum capacity. –  vectros Apr 18 '10 at 17:36
2  
However, it's not allowed to shrink. In fact, that's why the vector<int>().swap(v); idiom exists. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 18 '10 at 17:37
    
to clarify, is your comment regarding assignment or copy constructor? @litb I meant invalidate in sense make smaller. I get what you saying –  Anycorn Apr 18 '10 at 17:40

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