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Is there a limit to the length of a GET request?

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see also maximum length of HTTP GET request? –  Bergi Feb 11 at 2:22
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6 Answers

Not in the RFC, no, but there are practical limits.

The HTTP protocol does not place any a priori limit on the length of a URI. Servers MUST be able to handle the URI of any resource they serve, and SHOULD be able to handle URIs of unbounded length if they provide GET-based forms that could generate such URIs. A server SHOULD return 414 (Request-URI Too Long) status if a URI is longer than the server can handle (see section 10.4.15).

Note: Servers should be cautious about depending on URI lengths above 255 bytes, because some older client or proxy implementations may not properly support these lengths.

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HTTPbis adds a bit to this: "Various ad-hoc limitations on request-target length are found in practice. It is RECOMMENDED that all HTTP senders and recipients support request-target lengths of 8000 or more octets." tools.ietf.org/html/… –  Mark Nottingham Nov 16 '11 at 2:04
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This article sums it up pretty well

Summary: It's implementation dependent, as there is no specified limit in the RFC. It'd be safe to use up to 2000 characters (IE's limit.) If you are anywhere near this length, you should make sure you really need URIs that long, maybe an alternative design could get around that.

URIs should be readable, even when used to send data.

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Good writeup, but URI readability has nothing to do with GET vs POST. The purpose is to define a RESTful API for the web that differentiates between the functional differences of request types. HTTP GET requests may tend to be user readable for hyperlinks, but that's not their purpose, just one use. w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec9.html#sec9.3 –  DougW Feb 10 '12 at 5:52
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The purpose of URIs are not to define a RESTful API for the web. At all. w3.org/Provider/Style/URI.html –  Vinko Vrsalovic Feb 10 '12 at 11:22
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Correct. The purpose of GET & POST however, is. The question is asking about HTTP GET requests. You're assuming he means hyperlinks found on a website, intended for human readability. That's one particular usage of GET HTTP, but far from the only one. –  DougW Feb 10 '12 at 19:19
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Sorry but you're simply misinformed here. REST was concieved to describe the HTTP protocol, so while the term itself may post-date GET & POST, it exists solely to describe what they're for and what they do. I've got to appeal to authority here, because you're not arguing with me on this, you're arguing with Roy Fielding who wrote the HTTP spec and invented "REST". Again, the article you linked is concerned with human-readable URIs, which represents a small fraction of HTTP usage: "Short (as possible). This makes them easy to write down or spell or remember.". –  DougW Feb 17 '12 at 0:02
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I'm not arguing with Roy Fielding, I'm arguing with your interpretation of what Fielding says. In fact, you are interpreting the quote backwards, he's saying that HTTP/1.1 allows people to do REST the best way, not that HTTP/1.1's purpose is to do REST. I really don't see where he says that reason for the methods' existence (this is, their purpose) is to fit within a RESTful architecture. He says that if your application matches the scenario where REST makes sense, you should use it to get an optimum behavior. [ics.uci.edu/~fielding/pubs/dissertation/evaluation.htm#sec_6_1] –  Vinko Vrsalovic Feb 17 '12 at 14:54
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The specification does not limit the length of an HTTP Get request but the different browsers implement their own limitations. For example Internet Explorer has a limitation implemented at 2083 characters.

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Thanks for your accurate value => +1. However what is the specific version of IE? My IE8 does not accept more than 2048 characters on the address bar (URL entry box). But my JavaScript code can send XMLHttpRequest GET using 3586 characters (I did not test more). Therefore, where have you found 2083? Cheers. –  olibre Mar 15 '12 at 8:59
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I have done some more testing with IE8, IE9, FF14, Opera11, Chrome20 and Tomcat 6.0.32 (fresh installation), Jersey 1.13 on the server side. I used the jQuery function $.getJson and JSONP. Results: All Browsers allowed up to around 5400 chars. FF and IE9 did up to around 6200 chars. Everything above returned "400 Bad request". I did not further investigate what was responsible for the 400. I was fine with the maximum I found, because I needed around 2000 chars in my case. –  OneWorld Jul 30 '12 at 18:58
    
This MS KB article states IE8's (and earlier) URL limit for GET and POST URLs is 2083 chars: support.microsoft.com/kb/208427 –  Kevin Hooke Oct 30 '12 at 23:49
    
@OneWorld Your comment should be an answer so people will see it and I can up vote it. Thanks for the testing. –  erickson Jul 11 '13 at 16:15
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W3C unequivocally disclaimed this as a myth here

http://www.w3.org/2001/tag/doc/get7#myths

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It’s about a myth of a specific limit of 256 characters, and there is a provable limit in IE. –  Jukka K. Korpela Nov 22 '12 at 9:31
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The link is superseded by w3.org/2001/tag/doc/whenToUseGet-20030922#ephemeral (which says the same thing) –  Jonas Kölker Sep 17 '13 at 10:24
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As Requested By User Erickson, I Post My comment As Answer:

I have done some more testing with IE8, IE9, FF14, Opera11, Chrome20 and Tomcat 6.0.32 (fresh installation), Jersey 1.13 on the server side. I used the jQuery function $.getJson and JSONP. Results: All Browsers allowed up to around 5400 chars. FF and IE9 did up to around 6200 chars. Everything above returned "400 Bad request". I did not further investigate what was responsible for the 400. I was fine with the maximum I found, because I needed around 2000 chars in my case.

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setFixedLengthStreamingMode(int) with contentLength parameters could set the fixed length of a HTTP request body.

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