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Please see the snippet below and tell me how can I achieve the same strike-out effect as in the main text. I am using the version of LaTeX from the latest Ubuntu repositories.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{ulem}
\begin{document}
The sout tag works perfect in the \sout{main text area} but not inside the equations.
$$
list = [1, \sout{2}, 3, \sout{4}, 5, \sout{6}, 7, \sout{8}, 9, \sout{10}]
$$
Any clue?
\end{document}

Here is LaTeX output

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You should not use $$ in Latex. It is a plain Tex command. –  Debilski Apr 18 '10 at 21:33
1  
Furthe to what @Debilski said: there was a little discussion of this in stackoverflow.com/questions/2251417/latex-dollar-sign-vs. I don't regard using $$ as a crime, and I don't think $$ support is going away, but you're better off avoiding it. –  Charles Stewart Apr 19 '10 at 11:06
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closed as off topic by Cole Johnson, Matteo, Jean-Bernard Pellerin, Roman C, Eelke May 10 '13 at 7:18

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4 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It looks like the \sout doesn't work inside a math env. You can try doing something like this, which works:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{ulem}
\begin{document}
The sout tag works perfect in the \sout{main text area} but not inside the equations.

$list = $[1, \sout{2}, 3, \sout{4}, 5, \sout{6}, 7, \sout{8}, 9, \sout{10}$]$

Any clue?
\end{document}
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That does it elegantly. Thanks! –  Aamir Apr 18 '10 at 21:26
1  
But package ulem changes \emph{} to underline. –  Jeff Aug 29 '13 at 19:36
3  
from Sara's answer: "... to use strike-out without having ulem redefine how \emph{} works, use \usepackage[normalem]{ulem}". Thanks Sara! –  ɲeuroburɳ Nov 4 '13 at 17:56
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If anyone's still interested, I just found out about the cancel package, which allows you to strike your text in math mode in a few different ways. It's not horizontal, though -- only diagonal, which in my case is much better.

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Thanks for mentioning this. The \cancelto command is exactly what I needed. –  David L Feb 16 '12 at 22:49
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Pretty much any non-math-mode command can be used inside mathmode by putting it within a \text{} environment, e.g.:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{ulem}
\begin{document}
The sout tag works perfect in the \sout{main text area} but not inside the equations.

\[ list = [1, \text{\sout{2}}, 3, \text{\sout{4}}, 5, \text{\sout{6}}, 7, \text{\sout{8}}, 9, \text{\sout{10}}] \]
Any clue?
\end{document}

And if you'd like to be able to use strike-out without having ulem redefine how \emph{} works, use \usepackage[normalem]{ulem}.

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If you need to keep the strikeout in Math mode (e.g., to keep Math fonts) try:

\newcommand{\msout}[1]{\text{\sout{\ensuremath{#1}}}}

then

$\msout{\mathsf{stuckout}}$

you need amsmath and ulem.

(Solution from here.)

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