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I don't really understand how modulus division works. I was calculating 27 % 16 and wound up with 11 and I don't understand why.

I can't seem to find an explanation in layman's terms online. Can someone elaborate on a very high level as to what's going on here?

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15 Answers 15

up vote 42 down vote accepted

The result of a modulo division is the remainder of an integer division of the given numbers.

That means:

27 / 16 = 1, remainder 11
=> 27 mod 16 = 11

Other examples:

30 / 3 = 10, remainder 0
=> 30 mod 3 = 0

35 / 3 = 11, remainder 2
=> 35 mod 3 = 2
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Most explanations leave one important step.
Let's fill the gap using another example:
16 % 6 = 4
And 16 / 6 = 2
Then you multiply the result of your division with 6:
2 * 6 = 12
Now you will subtract 16 - 12 = 4
The answer - number 4 is the reminder, the same number as the result of modulus division.
You get the same with: 16 % 6 = 4.

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Maybe the example with an clock could help you understand the modulo.

A familiar use of modular arithmetic is its use in the 12-hour clock, in which the day is divided into two 12 hour periods.

Lets say we have currently this time: 15:00
But you could also say it is 3 pm

This is exactly what modulo does:

15 / 12 = 1, remainder 3

You find this example better explained on wikipedia: Wikipedia Modulo Article

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The simple formula for calculating modulus is :-

[Dividend-{(Dividend/Divisor)*Divisor}]

So, 27 % 16 :-

27- {(27/16)*16}

27-{1*16}

Answer= 11

Note:

All calculations are with integers. In case of a decimal quotient, the part after the decimal is to be ignored/truncated.

eg: 27/16= 1.6875 is to be taken as just 1 in the above mentioned formula. 0.6875 is ignored.

Compilers of computer languages treat an integer with decimal part the same way (by truncating after the decimal) as well

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modulus division is simply this : divide two numbers and return the remainder only

27 / 16 = 1 with 11 left over, therefore 27 % 16 = 11

ditto 43 / 16 = 2 with 11 left over so 43 % 16 = 11 too

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Very simple: a % b is defined as the remainder of the division of a by b.

See the wikipedia article for more examples.

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the modulus operator takes a division statement and returns whatever is left over from that calculation, the "remaining" data, so to speak. Such as 13 / 5 = 2. Which means, there is 3 left over, or remaining from that calculation. Why? because 2 * 5 = 10. Thus, 13 - 10 = 3.

The modulus operator does all that calculation for you, 12 % 5 = 3.

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Modulus division gives you the remainder of a division, rather than the quotient.

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It's simple, Modulus operator(%) returns remainder after integer division. Let's take the example of your question. How 27 % 16 = 11? When you simply divide 27 by 16 i.e (27/16) then you get remainder as 11, and that is why your answer is 11.

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I am wondering why this 3 % 5 = 3 is missed , in general x % y= x ,when x < y

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Yeah, this works with the remainder, too. 1 % 12 = 12 goes into 1, 0 times, 12*0 = 0, 1 - 0 = 1. 1/12 = 0R1, ergo 1 % 12 = 1. I think it helps to think of modulus as a "cyclic operator", i.e. n % 12 will ALWAYS be < 12, and the sequence for n = 0..100 is {0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,0...} –  B1KMusic Aug 21 at 18:29

Lets say you have 17 mod 6.

what total of 6 will get you the closest to 17, it will be 12 because if you go over 12 you will have 18 which is more that the question of 17 mod 6. You will then take 12 and minus from 17 which will give you your answer, in this case 5.

17 mod 6=5

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Easyer when your number after the dot (0.xxx) is short and then all you need to do is multiply that number with the number after the division.

Ex: 32 % 12 = 8

You do 32/12=2.666666667 Then you leave the full 2 away and focus on the 0.666666667 0.666666667*12=8 <-- That's your answer.

(again, only easy when the number after the dot is short)

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I was a bit confused by this too and this video was pretty helpful!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5cb_nfDyyM

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its so easy, i hope this simple steps will help 20 % 3=2

step1; 20/3=6do not include the .6667just ignored step2; 3*6=18 step3; 20-18=2 which is the reminder

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Could you please format this answer a little better? –  Code Maverick Apr 8 at 16:53

Modulus division is pretty simple. It uses the remainder instead of the quotient.

    1.0833... <-- Quotient
   __
12|13
   12
    1 <-- Remainder
    1.00 <-- Remainder can be used to find decimal values
     .96
     .040
     .036
     .0040 <-- remainder of 4 starts repeating here, so the quotient is 1.083333...

13/12 = 1R1, ergo 13%12 = 1.


It helps to think of modulus as a "cycle".

In other words, for the expression n % 12, the result will always be < 12.

That means the sequence for the set 0..100 for n % 12 is:

{0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,0,[...],4}

In that light, the modulus, as well as its uses, becomes much clearer.

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