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ill have an if statement

if (int1 < int2)
{}
else
{}

I want the else statement to run if both int1 and int2 are 0..

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11  
Did you even try 0 < 0? – Strilanc Apr 19 '10 at 1:21
5  
Please explain the downvote. SO is meant to be for all levels of programmers so, if it's just because you think the question is too easy, you may not understand the intent of the site. What may seem stupid to some is not for others. Example: I've been programming since the late '70s yet my questions on F# are likely to be very beginner-level. – paxdiablo Apr 19 '10 at 1:21
6  
I thought it was an emoticon. – John K Apr 19 '10 at 1:22
4  
When I have a "what does this do" question in .NET, I often fire up LINQPad and try it. Fast, easy, free. linqpad.net – TrueWill Apr 19 '10 at 1:22
7  
The answer to "Does ( 0 < 0 ) return true?": (0<0)? "Yes": "No" But really, if your question is that basic, just insert some code to output "Yes" in the if statement and "No" in the else. Debugging is an important skill to learn. – Wallacoloo Apr 19 '10 at 1:33
up vote 11 down vote accepted

No. 0 is not less than 0.

How about using an else if statement?

if (int1 < int2)
{
}
else if (int1 == 0 && int2 == 0)
{
}
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There are several answer to your immediate question, and plenty of other answers on this page. But there's a larger question that hasn't been addressed yet: why are you asking this question to a web forum, no matter how many expert programmers populate it?

There is an excellent tool at your disposal for automatically answering such questions, and you use it all the time: your C compiler! You just have to phrase the question correctly.

If there's something you don't understand, try putting together a small program to test out some logic and see what happens. Just keep around a simple template (I like ~/tmp/hello_world.c). When you have a question, just make a copy (say, ~/tmp/zerotest.c), add some feature you want to try out (like printf("Answer: %d\n", 0 < 0);), and run it until you understand what's going on.

I do this all the time. Even when I'm working on another project, sometimes I pull chunks of logic out into a little file and play around with it there until I understand. That's what this is about: finding an efficient way to teach yourself a language. Don't be afraid to experiment. It's extremely unlikely you will slap something together that will destroy your system. And even if that happens, I'm sure you can learn something from that experience too.

Get in the habit of experimenting. It's a skill you'll use for the rest of your programming career.

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(0 < 0) should logically return false, as between two equal numbers, one can not be less than the other. (0 <= 0) would return true.

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Currently your else clause will run when both ints are 0.

if you want 0s to be treated the same as int1 < int2 then

if( (int1 < int2) || (int1 == 0 && int2 ==0) )

but if you just want 0 < 0 to go to the else, it will...

or perhaps you have some code that you think should be going to your "else", but is entering your "if", but can't work out why so are wondering if 0 < 0? In which case, something else is likely going on in your code.

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No, (0<0) returns false.

It's difficult to understand the logic you propose in the context of the presented code.

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Of-course, 0==0 and NOT 0<0 or 0>0

In compiled languages such a c# you need to use comparison operator for each variable as stated in the above answers

if (int1 < int2)
{
}
else if (int1 == 0 && int2 == 0)
{
}

But, if your case is of some interpreted language such as python, you can use a simple inline comparison

if int1<int2:
     print "Less"
elif int1==int2==0:
     print "Equals to 0"
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