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I was just poking around into some new stuff in C++0x, when I hit a stumbling block:

#include <list>
#include <cstdio>
using namespace std;

template <typename T,typename F>
void ForEach (list<T> l, F f) {
    for (typename list<T>::iterator it=l.begin();it!=l.end();++it)
        f(*it);
}

int main() {
    int arr[] = {1,2,3,4,5,6};
    list<int> l (arr,arr+6);
    ForEach(l,[](int x){printf("%d\n",x);});
}

does not compile. I get a load of undefined symbol errors. Here's make's output:

 i386-apple-darwin9-gcc-4.5.0 -std=c++0x -I/usr/local/include -o func main.cpp
Undefined symbols:
  "___cxa_rethrow", referenced from:
      std::_List_node<int>* std::list<int, std::allocator<int> >::_M_create_node<int const&>(int const&&&) in ccPxxPwU.o
  "operator new(unsigned long)", referenced from:
      __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<std::_List_node<int> >::allocate(unsigned long, void const*) in ccPxxPwU.o
  "___gxx_personality_v0", referenced from:
      ___gxx_personality_v0$non_lazy_ptr in ccPxxPwU.o
  "___cxa_begin_catch", referenced from:
      std::_List_node<int>* std::list<int, std::allocator<int> >::_M_create_node<int const&>(int const&&&) in ccPxxPwU.o
  "operator delete(void*)", referenced from:
      __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<std::_List_node<int> >::deallocate(std::_List_node<int>*, unsigned long) in ccPxxPwU.o
  "___cxa_end_catch", referenced from:
      std::_List_node<int>* std::list<int, std::allocator<int> >::_M_create_node<int const&>(int const&&&) in ccPxxPwU.o
  "std::__throw_bad_alloc()", referenced from:
      __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<std::_List_node<int> >::allocate(unsigned long, void const*) in ccPxxPwU.o
  "std::_List_node_base::_M_hook(std::_List_node_base*)", referenced from:
      void std::list<int, std::allocator<int> >::_M_insert<int const&>(std::_List_iterator<int>, int const&&&) in ccPxxPwU.o
ld: symbol(s) not found
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status
make: *** [func] Error 1

Why is this not working?

share|improve this question
    
Not the problem you're having, but I think it would be better to accept the functor by reference instead of by value. –  Ben Voigt Apr 19 '10 at 4:15
1  
@Ben: Usually you want to take it by value, because if the functor is mutable it will still work. In the case you really don't want a copy being made, std::ref fixes that. @Austin: std::for_each works just as well. :P –  GManNickG Apr 19 '10 at 4:25
    
@GMan, well, yes, but the point was to play with new stuff... :D –  Austin Hyde Apr 19 '10 at 4:28
    
@GMan: If you had captured variables in your lambda, wouldn't pass-by-value break the connection? –  Ben Voigt Apr 19 '10 at 4:34
    
@Ben: Nope. Lambda's are not copy-assignable, but they have an implicitly generated copy-constructor (and move-constructor). It will be copy-constructed when the function is called, which will also bind the references of the copy as they were in the original lambda. –  GManNickG Apr 19 '10 at 4:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Those are link errors. Are you missing a C++ library? What if you used i386-apple-darwin9-g++-4.5.0?

P.S. I can't test this, as I have gcc 4.2.1 (i686-apple-darwin10-gcc-4.2.1) on my Mac and get:

cc1plus: error: unrecognized command line option "-std=c++0x"
share|improve this answer
3  
C++0x support requires a VERY new version of g++. But your suggestion of g++ instead of gcc probably hits the nail on the head. –  Ben Voigt Apr 19 '10 at 4:14
    
How would it get to the linker stage if gcc weren't recognizing it as a C++ source file? –  Dennis Zickefoose Apr 19 '10 at 4:20
    
Well, however it gets to the link stage, that is probably the problem. I get the exact same errors when compiling my c++0x code with gcc instead of g++ with 4.5. –  Dennis Zickefoose Apr 19 '10 at 4:27
5  
Any time you see Undefined symbols: ... "operator new(unsigned long)", you need to immediately think, "My C++ standard library is not being linked in. It thinks I'm building a C program." –  Mike DeSimone Apr 19 '10 at 4:44
    
@Dennis: For most programs, the compile and link steps are separate commands. You run a compile process for each source file, and when you're done, you take all the objects and link them. While gcc is fully capable of telling when it is fed C++ source at compile time by looking at the suffix, this information is discarded as soon as compilation completes, prior to linking, because all compiled files get the same suffix: .o. –  Mike DeSimone Sep 28 '10 at 21:56

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