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Snippets:

 private double memberVal;   
 public double MemberVal   
 {   
  get { return memberVal; }   
  set { memberVal= value; }   
 }

and

public double MemberVal   
 {    
  get; set;  
 }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, but now they are the same

private double memberVal;
public double MemberVal
{
    get { return memberVal; }
    set { memberVal= value; }
} 

and

public double MemberVal
{
get; set;
}

Update Except - as pointed out by Johannes Rössel - that you can access the field from code in the first case but not in the latter :-) –

Meaning that in the first code sample, within your class you can directly set the backing member for the property (i.e. private double memberVal1 e.g. memberVal = 1.1;), where in the second, there is still a private backing member for the property, but it's now invisible.
You can only access it through the property.

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2  
Except that you can access the field from code in the first case but not in the latter :-) –  Joey Apr 19 '10 at 7:43
    
Except for the inaccessible, auto-generated private member in the second example. –  cjk Apr 19 '10 at 7:44
    
There was mistake. MemberVal is public. –  Samvel Siradeghyan Apr 19 '10 at 8:21
    
@Johannes Rössel: Yes, that's well worth pointing out, have updated to include same :) –  Binary Worrier Apr 19 '10 at 8:31

Almost. In the second example, MemberVal is not publicly accessible.

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1  
it was mistake. MemberVal is public. –  Samvel Siradeghyan Apr 19 '10 at 8:18
    
@Samvel - Based on your edit, they are now the same. The first snippet will use one more variable than the second snippet, but the behavior is the same. –  Matt Apr 19 '10 at 8:22
    
"The first snippet will use one more variable than the second snippet" . . . ish . . . The class still have a private storage member for the property, it's autogenerated and invisible but can be seen through refelection and/or in IL. –  Binary Worrier Apr 19 '10 at 8:34

Yes, that code is equivalent, apart from MemberVal not being public in the second example (did you mean that). In the latter case, the compiler generates a field for you. It will have another, auto-generated name.

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private double memberVal;
public double MemberVal
{
    get { return memberVal; }
    set { memberVal= value; }
} 

public double MemberVal
{
    get; set;
}

second of the code-snippets is not supposed work on .net 2.0, coz it was introduced in .net 3.0.

The second is the short-hand notation for the first one but works only on .net 3.0 or higher.

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